A new generation at Foos Angus | TSLN.com

A new generation at Foos Angus

Photo courtesy Foos AngusBryce Foos puts their brand on a calf at their 2009 branding.

Time marches on in the ranching business and changes are a part of that. Foos Angus of Nisland, SD underwent a dramatic change late in the summer of 2008 when well-known Angus breeder, Norm Foos, passed away after a battle with cancer. The ranch was left in good hands though, as son Bryce was there to take over the reins.

He had worked with his dad for over a year, after returning from training horses in California at the time of his dad’s cancer diagnosis, so was “up to speed” on what the current program was at the ranch. Growing up, Bryce was always an integral part of the daily work, so it was very familiar to him.

Having the full responsibility and decision making thrust upon him, though, might have been too much for many a young man, and understandably so. Bryce, however, is conscientious and hard working, so was well equipped for the role of manager. His mother, Renee’, is the solid, supportive type who trusted him to be able to do the job as well.

When asked how it was going so far, Bryce grinned and said, “Well, it’s still under control. There’s another crop of calves that will be weaned soon, so life goes on.” He continued, “I got the A.I.ing done, clean up bulls pulled and the calves branded, so now I’m just waiting for it to dry up enough to start haying.”

This was the first year that Bryce had to decide which bull would be used on each cow.

“Dad had such good ideas about how they crossed on the different lines. I’ve had to go on cow production records and what I know about our bulls, and what’s worked in the past.” Bryce paused, “It would sure be good to be able to just ask him. EPD’s and stuff are good tools to use, but they’re not the same as what dad knew.”

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The 2009 calf crop was already in the works when Bryce took over. They are the fruits of Norm’s experience and intuition. This year, Bryce did the research and decided to stay pretty close to what’s worked already.

“I didn’t try anything too new. Not much point in changing something that’s already working for us,” said Bryce. “I A.I.ed to two outside bulls, but A.I.ed most of them to our own bulls. We retained semen interest in two bulls in last year’s sale and we used them too.”

Unlike some breeders who pursue fads and A.I. everything to outside bulls, Foos Angus has always believed that what they raise themselves is closer to what their goals are and more predictable. The proof is in consistently good doing cattle that prosper on forage and high roughage diets.

Norm’s goal was to have cattle that did it all on strictly forage and roughage, and Bryce’s is no different.

“I fed this year’s bulls out on a completely dry ration, no silage. Just ground hay, corn and oats. Corn was too high priced to feed much of it!” he added with a chuckle. “I didn’t plant corn this year, but did put in a lot of oats for hay. I’ll grind that with our other hay and add a little corn.”

Time marches on in the ranching business and changes are a part of that. Foos Angus of Nisland, SD underwent a dramatic change late in the summer of 2008 when well-known Angus breeder, Norm Foos, passed away after a battle with cancer. The ranch was left in good hands though, as son Bryce was there to take over the reins.

He had worked with his dad for over a year, after returning from training horses in California at the time of his dad’s cancer diagnosis, so was “up to speed” on what the current program was at the ranch. Growing up, Bryce was always an integral part of the daily work, so it was very familiar to him.

Having the full responsibility and decision making thrust upon him, though, might have been too much for many a young man, and understandably so. Bryce, however, is conscientious and hard working, so was well equipped for the role of manager. His mother, Renee’, is the solid, supportive type who trusted him to be able to do the job as well.

When asked how it was going so far, Bryce grinned and said, “Well, it’s still under control. There’s another crop of calves that will be weaned soon, so life goes on.” He continued, “I got the A.I.ing done, clean up bulls pulled and the calves branded, so now I’m just waiting for it to dry up enough to start haying.”

This was the first year that Bryce had to decide which bull would be used on each cow.

“Dad had such good ideas about how they crossed on the different lines. I’ve had to go on cow production records and what I know about our bulls, and what’s worked in the past.” Bryce paused, “It would sure be good to be able to just ask him. EPD’s and stuff are good tools to use, but they’re not the same as what dad knew.”

The 2009 calf crop was already in the works when Bryce took over. They are the fruits of Norm’s experience and intuition. This year, Bryce did the research and decided to stay pretty close to what’s worked already.

“I didn’t try anything too new. Not much point in changing something that’s already working for us,” said Bryce. “I A.I.ed to two outside bulls, but A.I.ed most of them to our own bulls. We retained semen interest in two bulls in last year’s sale and we used them too.”

Unlike some breeders who pursue fads and A.I. everything to outside bulls, Foos Angus has always believed that what they raise themselves is closer to what their goals are and more predictable. The proof is in consistently good doing cattle that prosper on forage and high roughage diets.

Norm’s goal was to have cattle that did it all on strictly forage and roughage, and Bryce’s is no different.

“I fed this year’s bulls out on a completely dry ration, no silage. Just ground hay, corn and oats. Corn was too high priced to feed much of it!” he added with a chuckle. “I didn’t plant corn this year, but did put in a lot of oats for hay. I’ll grind that with our other hay and add a little corn.”

Time marches on in the ranching business and changes are a part of that. Foos Angus of Nisland, SD underwent a dramatic change late in the summer of 2008 when well-known Angus breeder, Norm Foos, passed away after a battle with cancer. The ranch was left in good hands though, as son Bryce was there to take over the reins.

He had worked with his dad for over a year, after returning from training horses in California at the time of his dad’s cancer diagnosis, so was “up to speed” on what the current program was at the ranch. Growing up, Bryce was always an integral part of the daily work, so it was very familiar to him.

Having the full responsibility and decision making thrust upon him, though, might have been too much for many a young man, and understandably so. Bryce, however, is conscientious and hard working, so was well equipped for the role of manager. His mother, Renee’, is the solid, supportive type who trusted him to be able to do the job as well.

When asked how it was going so far, Bryce grinned and said, “Well, it’s still under control. There’s another crop of calves that will be weaned soon, so life goes on.” He continued, “I got the A.I.ing done, clean up bulls pulled and the calves branded, so now I’m just waiting for it to dry up enough to start haying.”

This was the first year that Bryce had to decide which bull would be used on each cow.

“Dad had such good ideas about how they crossed on the different lines. I’ve had to go on cow production records and what I know about our bulls, and what’s worked in the past.” Bryce paused, “It would sure be good to be able to just ask him. EPD’s and stuff are good tools to use, but they’re not the same as what dad knew.”

The 2009 calf crop was already in the works when Bryce took over. They are the fruits of Norm’s experience and intuition. This year, Bryce did the research and decided to stay pretty close to what’s worked already.

“I didn’t try anything too new. Not much point in changing something that’s already working for us,” said Bryce. “I A.I.ed to two outside bulls, but A.I.ed most of them to our own bulls. We retained semen interest in two bulls in last year’s sale and we used them too.”

Unlike some breeders who pursue fads and A.I. everything to outside bulls, Foos Angus has always believed that what they raise themselves is closer to what their goals are and more predictable. The proof is in consistently good doing cattle that prosper on forage and high roughage diets.

Norm’s goal was to have cattle that did it all on strictly forage and roughage, and Bryce’s is no different.

“I fed this year’s bulls out on a completely dry ration, no silage. Just ground hay, corn and oats. Corn was too high priced to feed much of it!” he added with a chuckle. “I didn’t plant corn this year, but did put in a lot of oats for hay. I’ll grind that with our other hay and add a little corn.”