Agriculture in endless war with HSUS, Martosko says | TSLN.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Agriculture in endless war with HSUS, Martosko says

Agriculture – and particularly animal agriculture – is engaged “in an endless war” with the Humane Society of the United States, (HSUS) David Martosko, with the Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF) said last Thursday. He was speaking to the Agricultural Business Council of Kansas City.

He painted a “sobering picture” of HSUS. First, they are a “seriously wealthy organization,” with assets of $191 million. And they’re winning the battle for public opinion: a survey, commissioned by the CCF, found that 83 percent had an overall favorable impression of the group.

As for their leadership, CEO Wayne Pacelle “is the smoothest politician I’ve ever met,” Martosko said. “His goal is to cripple” animal agriculture and put it out of business. HSUS has a 30-40 year plan to eliminate animal protein from the diet, he said. That may sound unthinkable, but Martosko said it takes about 30 years for an idea to move from unthinkable, to a matter of public policy.

An idea moves from unthinkable, to radical, to sensible, to public policy. For example, he said, consider today’s ban on smoking in public places. Thirty years ago, the idea was unthinkable.

Noting that “It’s impossible to fully pacify an animal rights group…what does animal agriculture do? Tell your story, or push back?” The answer is, “You have to do both.” Martosko said. HSUS is always playing offense, “while most people in agriculture are playing defense.”

Agriculture must “change the conventional wisdom about HSUS” and “tarnish their moral authority…using facts and figures.” There is plenty of information to do just that on CCF’s “watchdog Web site” about HSUS activities, http://www.humanewatch.org.

Two interesting figures Martosko offered his Kansas City audience: less than one percent of the HSUS annual budget goes to assist local pet shelters, and HSUS this year projects spending more on salaries than the White House.

“You have to get up and do something” to battle the HSUS master plan, he said, concluding with “Either you believe in farming, or you don’t. Either you are willing to defend it, or you’re not.”

Martosko holds degrees from Dartmouth College and Johns Hopkins University. He has been a guest on most of the major broadcast and cable news magazine shows, and has testified before both houses of Congress about the unique threats posed by the modern animal rights movement.

Agriculture – and particularly animal agriculture – is engaged “in an endless war” with the Humane Society of the United States, (HSUS) David Martosko, with the Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF) said last Thursday. He was speaking to the Agricultural Business Council of Kansas City.

He painted a “sobering picture” of HSUS. First, they are a “seriously wealthy organization,” with assets of $191 million. And they’re winning the battle for public opinion: a survey, commissioned by the CCF, found that 83 percent had an overall favorable impression of the group.

As for their leadership, CEO Wayne Pacelle “is the smoothest politician I’ve ever met,” Martosko said. “His goal is to cripple” animal agriculture and put it out of business. HSUS has a 30-40 year plan to eliminate animal protein from the diet, he said. That may sound unthinkable, but Martosko said it takes about 30 years for an idea to move from unthinkable, to a matter of public policy.

An idea moves from unthinkable, to radical, to sensible, to public policy. For example, he said, consider today’s ban on smoking in public places. Thirty years ago, the idea was unthinkable.

Noting that “It’s impossible to fully pacify an animal rights group…what does animal agriculture do? Tell your story, or push back?” The answer is, “You have to do both.” Martosko said. HSUS is always playing offense, “while most people in agriculture are playing defense.”

Agriculture must “change the conventional wisdom about HSUS” and “tarnish their moral authority…using facts and figures.” There is plenty of information to do just that on CCF’s “watchdog Web site” about HSUS activities, http://www.humanewatch.org.

Two interesting figures Martosko offered his Kansas City audience: less than one percent of the HSUS annual budget goes to assist local pet shelters, and HSUS this year projects spending more on salaries than the White House.

“You have to get up and do something” to battle the HSUS master plan, he said, concluding with “Either you believe in farming, or you don’t. Either you are willing to defend it, or you’re not.”

Martosko holds degrees from Dartmouth College and Johns Hopkins University. He has been a guest on most of the major broadcast and cable news magazine shows, and has testified before both houses of Congress about the unique threats posed by the modern animal rights movement.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User