Ambassadors on the move | TSLN.com

Ambassadors on the move

Amanda Nolz

Courtesy photoA National Beef Ambassador speaks to consumers at the Boston Marathon.

Despite the recent cut of the National Beef Ambassador Program (NBAP) from the beef checkoff program, the American National Cattlewomen, Inc. (ANCW) is determined to keep the ambassadors traveling on behalf of the nation’s cattlemen. In a time when money is tight, meat products are the first things to get cut from the grocery list. Now is more important than ever before for beef ambassadors to speak in urban areas about the nutritional benefits and versatility of meat products.

Certainly, you have spotted the ambassadors on the move. Their infamous red shirts stamped with the notorious BEEF symbol can be seen from coast-to-coast, anywhere consumers are found. They work at the Boston Marathon serving beef stew samples to running enthusiasts. They work at the Pennsylvania Farm Show teaching millions of people about beef and veal production. Ambassadors are found in college campuses, elementary schools and state fairs. They lobby for cattlemen in Washington D.C, blog online to consumers and travel to cattle conventions to work with producers.

Despite the recent cut of the National Beef Ambassador Program (NBAP) from the beef checkoff program, the American National Cattlewomen, Inc. (ANCW) is determined to keep the ambassadors traveling on behalf of the nation’s cattlemen. In a time when money is tight, meat products are the first things to get cut from the grocery list. Now is more important than ever before for beef ambassadors to speak in urban areas about the nutritional benefits and versatility of meat products.

Certainly, you have spotted the ambassadors on the move. Their infamous red shirts stamped with the notorious BEEF symbol can be seen from coast-to-coast, anywhere consumers are found. They work at the Boston Marathon serving beef stew samples to running enthusiasts. They work at the Pennsylvania Farm Show teaching millions of people about beef and veal production. Ambassadors are found in college campuses, elementary schools and state fairs. They lobby for cattlemen in Washington D.C, blog online to consumers and travel to cattle conventions to work with producers.

Despite the recent cut of the National Beef Ambassador Program (NBAP) from the beef checkoff program, the American National Cattlewomen, Inc. (ANCW) is determined to keep the ambassadors traveling on behalf of the nation’s cattlemen. In a time when money is tight, meat products are the first things to get cut from the grocery list. Now is more important than ever before for beef ambassadors to speak in urban areas about the nutritional benefits and versatility of meat products.

Certainly, you have spotted the ambassadors on the move. Their infamous red shirts stamped with the notorious BEEF symbol can be seen from coast-to-coast, anywhere consumers are found. They work at the Boston Marathon serving beef stew samples to running enthusiasts. They work at the Pennsylvania Farm Show teaching millions of people about beef and veal production. Ambassadors are found in college campuses, elementary schools and state fairs. They lobby for cattlemen in Washington D.C, blog online to consumers and travel to cattle conventions to work with producers.

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Despite the recent cut of the National Beef Ambassador Program (NBAP) from the beef checkoff program, the American National Cattlewomen, Inc. (ANCW) is determined to keep the ambassadors traveling on behalf of the nation’s cattlemen. In a time when money is tight, meat products are the first things to get cut from the grocery list. Now is more important than ever before for beef ambassadors to speak in urban areas about the nutritional benefits and versatility of meat products.

Certainly, you have spotted the ambassadors on the move. Their infamous red shirts stamped with the notorious BEEF symbol can be seen from coast-to-coast, anywhere consumers are found. They work at the Boston Marathon serving beef stew samples to running enthusiasts. They work at the Pennsylvania Farm Show teaching millions of people about beef and veal production. Ambassadors are found in college campuses, elementary schools and state fairs. They lobby for cattlemen in Washington D.C, blog online to consumers and travel to cattle conventions to work with producers.