An online gallop | TSLN.com

An online gallop

For the Oct. 17, 2009 edition of Tri-State Livestock News.

October seems to bring Hall of Fame events to the calendar forefront. This outfit is about to head for Fort Worth, TX and the National Cowgirl Museum & Hall of Fame’s annual reunion and Honoree Induction Luncheon and Ceremony. All that happens Oct. 15th and 16th; highlighted by the Induction Luncheon where Laura W. Bush receives the Gloria Lupton Tennison Pioneer Award, and four women – Deborah Copenhaver Fellows, Kay Whittaker Young, Mary Jane Colter and Cornelia “Ninia” Wadsworth Ritchie – are inducted into the Hall of Fame. Some 900 people attended the Champagne Reception, Induction Luncheon and special Christmas Shopping event last year and even more will be there this year. I’m privileged to again give the luncheon invocation – and my cowboy and I are looking forward to seeing a lot of old friends and meeting new ones.

The National Cowboy Museum & Western Heritage Center will follow up a week later as their Rodeo Hall of Fame inducts the Class of 2009 in festivities Oct. 23 through 25. Walter Alsbaugh and Harry Vold of Colorado; Joe Chase and Tom Tescher of North Dakota; Chuck Henson of Arizona; Reg Kesler of Montana and Canada; John J. Miller and Cotton Rosser of California and Florence Price Youree of Oklahoma make up the 2009 list of Honorees being inducted. Liz Kesler joins her late husband in receiving accolades as she’s honored with the prestigious and coveted Tad Lucas Memorial Award; while Neal Gay will pick up the Ben Johnson Memorial award. California team roping icon Bob Feist will serve as master of ceremonies.

The Rodeo Historical Society (RHS) will hold a silent and live auction Oct. 23rd and 24th, with all proceeds to benefit the RHS. Those monies will assist in acquisitions of rodeo-related material for the Museum’s artifact, photographic and research collections; the Museum’s Oral History Project; publication of The Ketchpen, the Society’s bi-annual magazine; and events like the Rodeo Hall of Fame induction ceremonies. Donations for the auction are sought, and will be accepted until Oct. 22. To donate, contact the RHS assistant at (405) 478-2250, Ext. 269. The invitation for all these events is available online, and reservations can be made at http://www.nationalcowboymuseum.org/rhs.

Having mentioned the late great Tom Tescher, I want to share the address of a site you’ll really enjoy viewing – http://wildhorsesoftrnp.blogspot.com/2009/07/tom-teschers-story.html. You will see the beautiful North Dakota Badlands, some of the horses that run there, and get personal insight into one great love of Tom Tescher’s.

As long as we’re talking wonderful things you can see online, I just have to share a couple others. Horses are our first love, and they are the most amazing of natural creations. Their ability to learn and be trained is phenomenal and if you go to http://www.jbpre.Fr/MERLIN.wmv you will get a download of a beautiful Palomino horse of the French Camargue that’s trained for use in non-lethal bullfighting. The guardians breed both bulls and horses for the sport, and the bulls that fight are then retired to a life of ease and adulation as champions of the ring; bred and groomed for the sport and loved by their owners. Watching this horse perform his work is poetry in motion!

Moving from domesticated animals into the wild that we’re so bles’t to live in the midst of across Tri-State Country, here’s the link to some amazing film footage capturing animal interaction in a beautiful and exciting manner: http://www.flixxy.com/bear-animal-nature-film.htm. I hope you enjoy each of these.

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On the horse health front, we are bombasted with ads and information, most of it encouraging us to buy something, feed something, spend money and enhance what we do with our horses. Sometimes all that’s not necessary… sometimes it’s not even healthy.

According to recent research by Swedish equine diet specialists, reported by The Horse, “Horses fed a diet of only forage have greater bacterial stability and fewer ‘bad’ fecal bacteria, such as Streptococcus spp, than horses that are also fed concentrates. This finding… provides opportunities for the industry to develop more targeted feeding strategies to support equine health and welfare.”

“Diets rich in readily fermentable carbohydrates, fed traditionally to meet the increased energy requirements of the performance horse, are associated with a number of gastrointestinal disorders that involve disturbances in the intestinal microbiota,” wrote the research team, led by Professor Jan Erik Lindberg from the Department of Animal Science at the Swedish University of Agricultural Science.

This study is the first to describe changes in the uncultured bacterial populations of horses. Ultimately, the Swedish researchers hope to improve the intestinal health of horses and increase the body of knowledge regarding the relationship between diet and microbiota. Research concerning bacteria that appear and disappear with changes in diet is ongoing.

This study will be published in an upcoming edition of the Equine Veterinary Journal, and the abstract is available online.

Research continues to bear out the fact that many supplements given to horses “are not needed” – furthermore “giving too many can be a waste of money at best and harmful at worst.”

Researchers in the 2008 study “Feeding management practices and supplement use in top-level event horses” say, “Joint supplements have never been proven to prevent problems like arthritis… if there are no obvious changes three months after initiating the supplement you could discontinue… not all horses respond to all joint supplements.”

Another warning coming from recent research is that “feeding multiple supplements with overlapping ingredients could create problems… magnesium, selenium and Vitamin A are most commonly overdosed, creating the possibility for toxicity. Checking with a vet or nutritionist prior to supplementing… or when giving multiple supplements, is always the wisest course.

Finally, here’s another dire warning on the direction government control is taking. Gregory M. Dennis, JD, wrote a commentary in the latest Equine Disease Quarterly from the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture on the term “Animal Guardianship” that’s frightening, to say the least. He begins, “Imagine that overnight a new state law goes into effect declaring that from now on you do not own your animals but rather you are their ‘guardian.’ Does this sound farfetched? Some local communities have already made this change. The first legal step on this road has been the addition of ‘owner-guardian’ language to local ordinances, then changing the wording to ‘guardian’ only. One state now has ‘owner-guardian’ as a part of its law, and various federal agencies are using the word ‘guardian’ in conjunction with ‘owner’ whenever the latter appears in their regulations.”

“Animal guardianship advocates suggest that referring to the human-animal relationship as one of guardianship rather than ownership will lead to better animal care,” Dennis continues. “There is little basis for this assertion; an abusive animal owner would likely be an abusive animal ‘guardian.'”

Dennis points out, “‘Ownership’ and ‘guardianship’ are two distinct legal terms. The first is an expression and protection of the property owner’s legal rights, while the second imposes numerous legal duties and obligations on the guardian. Today as an animal owner, you can decide the animal’s care and future as long as you are not abusive, cruel or neglectful: what to feed or where to house them; which animals to breed them with; what veterinary care to provide; whether to sell them, put them down, or include them in your Will. If the law changes and you no longer own your horses but instead become their ‘guardian,’ you will always have to act in the horse’s best interest. As you can well imagine, there will be many times when your horses’ best interests are not yours; euthanizing a horse to avoid a substantial veterinary bill could be prohibited as could using horses in endeavors like racing and showing. A guardian would be unable to sell horses, as they are no longer property.”

Gregory Dennis concludes, “The list of legal repercussions that could befall horse owners should the law be changed from ownership to ‘guardianship’ is extensive, and it behooves the horse industry to remain vigilant about pending legislation.”

You can contact him at (913) 498-1700; gdennis@ktplaw.com; or Kent T. Perry & Co., L.C., Overland Park, KS.

That’s the end of our ol’ lariat rope for this time…

October seems to bring Hall of Fame events to the calendar forefront. This outfit is about to head for Fort Worth, TX and the National Cowgirl Museum & Hall of Fame’s annual reunion and Honoree Induction Luncheon and Ceremony. All that happens Oct. 15th and 16th; highlighted by the Induction Luncheon where Laura W. Bush receives the Gloria Lupton Tennison Pioneer Award, and four women – Deborah Copenhaver Fellows, Kay Whittaker Young, Mary Jane Colter and Cornelia “Ninia” Wadsworth Ritchie – are inducted into the Hall of Fame. Some 900 people attended the Champagne Reception, Induction Luncheon and special Christmas Shopping event last year and even more will be there this year. I’m privileged to again give the luncheon invocation – and my cowboy and I are looking forward to seeing a lot of old friends and meeting new ones.

The National Cowboy Museum & Western Heritage Center will follow up a week later as their Rodeo Hall of Fame inducts the Class of 2009 in festivities Oct. 23 through 25. Walter Alsbaugh and Harry Vold of Colorado; Joe Chase and Tom Tescher of North Dakota; Chuck Henson of Arizona; Reg Kesler of Montana and Canada; John J. Miller and Cotton Rosser of California and Florence Price Youree of Oklahoma make up the 2009 list of Honorees being inducted. Liz Kesler joins her late husband in receiving accolades as she’s honored with the prestigious and coveted Tad Lucas Memorial Award; while Neal Gay will pick up the Ben Johnson Memorial award. California team roping icon Bob Feist will serve as master of ceremonies.

The Rodeo Historical Society (RHS) will hold a silent and live auction Oct. 23rd and 24th, with all proceeds to benefit the RHS. Those monies will assist in acquisitions of rodeo-related material for the Museum’s artifact, photographic and research collections; the Museum’s Oral History Project; publication of The Ketchpen, the Society’s bi-annual magazine; and events like the Rodeo Hall of Fame induction ceremonies. Donations for the auction are sought, and will be accepted until Oct. 22. To donate, contact the RHS assistant at (405) 478-2250, Ext. 269. The invitation for all these events is available online, and reservations can be made at http://www.nationalcowboymuseum.org/rhs.

Having mentioned the late great Tom Tescher, I want to share the address of a site you’ll really enjoy viewing – http://wildhorsesoftrnp.blogspot.com/2009/07/tom-teschers-story.html. You will see the beautiful North Dakota Badlands, some of the horses that run there, and get personal insight into one great love of Tom Tescher’s.

As long as we’re talking wonderful things you can see online, I just have to share a couple others. Horses are our first love, and they are the most amazing of natural creations. Their ability to learn and be trained is phenomenal and if you go to http://www.jbpre.Fr/MERLIN.wmv you will get a download of a beautiful Palomino horse of the French Camargue that’s trained for use in non-lethal bullfighting. The guardians breed both bulls and horses for the sport, and the bulls that fight are then retired to a life of ease and adulation as champions of the ring; bred and groomed for the sport and loved by their owners. Watching this horse perform his work is poetry in motion!

Moving from domesticated animals into the wild that we’re so bles’t to live in the midst of across Tri-State Country, here’s the link to some amazing film footage capturing animal interaction in a beautiful and exciting manner: http://www.flixxy.com/bear-animal-nature-film.htm. I hope you enjoy each of these.

On the horse health front, we are bombasted with ads and information, most of it encouraging us to buy something, feed something, spend money and enhance what we do with our horses. Sometimes all that’s not necessary… sometimes it’s not even healthy.

According to recent research by Swedish equine diet specialists, reported by The Horse, “Horses fed a diet of only forage have greater bacterial stability and fewer ‘bad’ fecal bacteria, such as Streptococcus spp, than horses that are also fed concentrates. This finding… provides opportunities for the industry to develop more targeted feeding strategies to support equine health and welfare.”

“Diets rich in readily fermentable carbohydrates, fed traditionally to meet the increased energy requirements of the performance horse, are associated with a number of gastrointestinal disorders that involve disturbances in the intestinal microbiota,” wrote the research team, led by Professor Jan Erik Lindberg from the Department of Animal Science at the Swedish University of Agricultural Science.

This study is the first to describe changes in the uncultured bacterial populations of horses. Ultimately, the Swedish researchers hope to improve the intestinal health of horses and increase the body of knowledge regarding the relationship between diet and microbiota. Research concerning bacteria that appear and disappear with changes in diet is ongoing.

This study will be published in an upcoming edition of the Equine Veterinary Journal, and the abstract is available online.

Research continues to bear out the fact that many supplements given to horses “are not needed” – furthermore “giving too many can be a waste of money at best and harmful at worst.”

Researchers in the 2008 study “Feeding management practices and supplement use in top-level event horses” say, “Joint supplements have never been proven to prevent problems like arthritis… if there are no obvious changes three months after initiating the supplement you could discontinue… not all horses respond to all joint supplements.”

Another warning coming from recent research is that “feeding multiple supplements with overlapping ingredients could create problems… magnesium, selenium and Vitamin A are most commonly overdosed, creating the possibility for toxicity. Checking with a vet or nutritionist prior to supplementing… or when giving multiple supplements, is always the wisest course.

Finally, here’s another dire warning on the direction government control is taking. Gregory M. Dennis, JD, wrote a commentary in the latest Equine Disease Quarterly from the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture on the term “Animal Guardianship” that’s frightening, to say the least. He begins, “Imagine that overnight a new state law goes into effect declaring that from now on you do not own your animals but rather you are their ‘guardian.’ Does this sound farfetched? Some local communities have already made this change. The first legal step on this road has been the addition of ‘owner-guardian’ language to local ordinances, then changing the wording to ‘guardian’ only. One state now has ‘owner-guardian’ as a part of its law, and various federal agencies are using the word ‘guardian’ in conjunction with ‘owner’ whenever the latter appears in their regulations.”

“Animal guardianship advocates suggest that referring to the human-animal relationship as one of guardianship rather than ownership will lead to better animal care,” Dennis continues. “There is little basis for this assertion; an abusive animal owner would likely be an abusive animal ‘guardian.'”

Dennis points out, “‘Ownership’ and ‘guardianship’ are two distinct legal terms. The first is an expression and protection of the property owner’s legal rights, while the second imposes numerous legal duties and obligations on the guardian. Today as an animal owner, you can decide the animal’s care and future as long as you are not abusive, cruel or neglectful: what to feed or where to house them; which animals to breed them with; what veterinary care to provide; whether to sell them, put them down, or include them in your Will. If the law changes and you no longer own your horses but instead become their ‘guardian,’ you will always have to act in the horse’s best interest. As you can well imagine, there will be many times when your horses’ best interests are not yours; euthanizing a horse to avoid a substantial veterinary bill could be prohibited as could using horses in endeavors like racing and showing. A guardian would be unable to sell horses, as they are no longer property.”

Gregory Dennis concludes, “The list of legal repercussions that could befall horse owners should the law be changed from ownership to ‘guardianship’ is extensive, and it behooves the horse industry to remain vigilant about pending legislation.”

You can contact him at (913) 498-1700; gdennis@ktplaw.com; or Kent T. Perry & Co., L.C., Overland Park, KS.

That’s the end of our ol’ lariat rope for this time…