An online social networking site made for ranchers | TSLN.com

An online social networking site made for ranchers

Amanda Nolz

Courtesy photoA comparison between a regular sized Angus and a Lowline Angus shows the size difference for those not familiar with the breed.

It all started with a 4-H project. Wyoming real estate agent Chad Galloday was living on a modest four-acre plot with his family of six. Wanting to get his kids involved in 4-H and agriculture, Galloday wanted a manageable cattle project for his nine-year old daughter. In his research to finding the perfect project, Galloday discovered Lowline Angus. Soon his love for the breed grew, and he quickly moved his family to a 300-acre ranch where they could expand their cowherd and enjoy the tranquility of country life.

Three years later, the Galloday family is raising cattle and hay. They are members of the Lowline Angus Association, where there are fewer than 200 members owning less than 1,000 registered females. Galloday realized that he needed a way to inform others of his efficient, grass-fed commercial cattle.

“Despite the numerous fairs and stock shows that we participate in, it has always been a struggle to make new contacts in the industry,” said Galloday.

It all started with a 4-H project. Wyoming real estate agent Chad Galloday was living on a modest four-acre plot with his family of six. Wanting to get his kids involved in 4-H and agriculture, Galloday wanted a manageable cattle project for his nine-year old daughter. In his research to finding the perfect project, Galloday discovered Lowline Angus. Soon his love for the breed grew, and he quickly moved his family to a 300-acre ranch where they could expand their cowherd and enjoy the tranquility of country life.

Three years later, the Galloday family is raising cattle and hay. They are members of the Lowline Angus Association, where there are fewer than 200 members owning less than 1,000 registered females. Galloday realized that he needed a way to inform others of his efficient, grass-fed commercial cattle.

“Despite the numerous fairs and stock shows that we participate in, it has always been a struggle to make new contacts in the industry,” said Galloday.

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It all started with a 4-H project. Wyoming real estate agent Chad Galloday was living on a modest four-acre plot with his family of six. Wanting to get his kids involved in 4-H and agriculture, Galloday wanted a manageable cattle project for his nine-year old daughter. In his research to finding the perfect project, Galloday discovered Lowline Angus. Soon his love for the breed grew, and he quickly moved his family to a 300-acre ranch where they could expand their cowherd and enjoy the tranquility of country life.

Three years later, the Galloday family is raising cattle and hay. They are members of the Lowline Angus Association, where there are fewer than 200 members owning less than 1,000 registered females. Galloday realized that he needed a way to inform others of his efficient, grass-fed commercial cattle.

“Despite the numerous fairs and stock shows that we participate in, it has always been a struggle to make new contacts in the industry,” said Galloday.