Area producers try cover crops for supplemental grazing | TSLN.com

Area producers try cover crops for supplemental grazing

Amanda Nolz

Photo courtesy Josh DukartCover crops providing a tangled web on the ground just after cattle had grazed on it.

Area range specialists, cattle producers and extension educators met on Oct. 6-7, 2009 in Mitchell, SD for the 2009 Joint Meeting of the South Dakota Society for Range Management and South Dakota Soil and Water Conservation Society. The meeting was themed, “Healthy Soils=Healthy Lands.” One of the featured speakers at the event was Josh Dukart of the North Dakota Conservation District. His presentation was titled, “Enhancing soil health with cover crops and livestock.”

“Jay Fuhrer once said that the soil needs food and a home,” said Dukart. “We have two tools to improve the soil, growing cover crops and using our livestock. Planned grazing is environmentally, economically and socially beneficial, and three producers have allowed me to share their experiences with doing just that.”

One of the main points of his speech was that livestock are essential to promote healthy soils, and allowing cattle to graze on cover crops in fields will help improve the soil. He described the efforts of three different operations, as they tried planting cover crops for their cattle.

Area range specialists, cattle producers and extension educators met on Oct. 6-7, 2009 in Mitchell, SD for the 2009 Joint Meeting of the South Dakota Society for Range Management and South Dakota Soil and Water Conservation Society. The meeting was themed, “Healthy Soils=Healthy Lands.” One of the featured speakers at the event was Josh Dukart of the North Dakota Conservation District. His presentation was titled, “Enhancing soil health with cover crops and livestock.”

“Jay Fuhrer once said that the soil needs food and a home,” said Dukart. “We have two tools to improve the soil, growing cover crops and using our livestock. Planned grazing is environmentally, economically and socially beneficial, and three producers have allowed me to share their experiences with doing just that.”

One of the main points of his speech was that livestock are essential to promote healthy soils, and allowing cattle to graze on cover crops in fields will help improve the soil. He described the efforts of three different operations, as they tried planting cover crops for their cattle.

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Area range specialists, cattle producers and extension educators met on Oct. 6-7, 2009 in Mitchell, SD for the 2009 Joint Meeting of the South Dakota Society for Range Management and South Dakota Soil and Water Conservation Society. The meeting was themed, “Healthy Soils=Healthy Lands.” One of the featured speakers at the event was Josh Dukart of the North Dakota Conservation District. His presentation was titled, “Enhancing soil health with cover crops and livestock.”

“Jay Fuhrer once said that the soil needs food and a home,” said Dukart. “We have two tools to improve the soil, growing cover crops and using our livestock. Planned grazing is environmentally, economically and socially beneficial, and three producers have allowed me to share their experiences with doing just that.”

One of the main points of his speech was that livestock are essential to promote healthy soils, and allowing cattle to graze on cover crops in fields will help improve the soil. He described the efforts of three different operations, as they tried planting cover crops for their cattle.

Area range specialists, cattle producers and extension educators met on Oct. 6-7, 2009 in Mitchell, SD for the 2009 Joint Meeting of the South Dakota Society for Range Management and South Dakota Soil and Water Conservation Society. The meeting was themed, “Healthy Soils=Healthy Lands.” One of the featured speakers at the event was Josh Dukart of the North Dakota Conservation District. His presentation was titled, “Enhancing soil health with cover crops and livestock.”

“Jay Fuhrer once said that the soil needs food and a home,” said Dukart. “We have two tools to improve the soil, growing cover crops and using our livestock. Planned grazing is environmentally, economically and socially beneficial, and three producers have allowed me to share their experiences with doing just that.”

One of the main points of his speech was that livestock are essential to promote healthy soils, and allowing cattle to graze on cover crops in fields will help improve the soil. He described the efforts of three different operations, as they tried planting cover crops for their cattle.

Area range specialists, cattle producers and extension educators met on Oct. 6-7, 2009 in Mitchell, SD for the 2009 Joint Meeting of the South Dakota Society for Range Management and South Dakota Soil and Water Conservation Society. The meeting was themed, “Healthy Soils=Healthy Lands.” One of the featured speakers at the event was Josh Dukart of the North Dakota Conservation District. His presentation was titled, “Enhancing soil health with cover crops and livestock.”

“Jay Fuhrer once said that the soil needs food and a home,” said Dukart. “We have two tools to improve the soil, growing cover crops and using our livestock. Planned grazing is environmentally, economically and socially beneficial, and three producers have allowed me to share their experiences with doing just that.”

One of the main points of his speech was that livestock are essential to promote healthy soils, and allowing cattle to graze on cover crops in fields will help improve the soil. He described the efforts of three different operations, as they tried planting cover crops for their cattle.