Back to the baldies | TSLN.com

Back to the baldies

Loretta Sorensen

Photo by Loretta SorensenCraig Sargent took over his father's ranch at Winner at the age of 21. He and his wife, Heather, raise cattle, corn and alfalfa.

By the time he took over his father’s Winner, SD ranch at the age of 21, Craig Sargent knew what he liked in cattle and he wasn’t finding it in the black Angus his father had produced on their 1,500 acre operation. With a bit of research and investigation of neighboring ranchers, he decided to begin re-introducing Herefords to his herd.

“My dad used to raise Hereford females and run Charolais bulls,” Sargent said. “The last years that he was on the ranch, black Angus were popular in this area and he started producing black-on-black.”

Sargent thought the calves he and his father were raising out of the black Angus breeding were smaller than what he would like. Since cow/calf pairs are such a large part of his operation, he decided it would make sense to produce some bigger calves.

“We have about 470 cow/calf pairs,” Sargent said. “I’m the third generation here. I have cousins who ranch here too and we help each other out whenever we can.”

The traits Sargent liked about the Angus were their disposition and udders. What he wanted to add to the cattle he was producing was size and weight.

By the time he took over his father’s Winner, SD ranch at the age of 21, Craig Sargent knew what he liked in cattle and he wasn’t finding it in the black Angus his father had produced on their 1,500 acre operation. With a bit of research and investigation of neighboring ranchers, he decided to begin re-introducing Herefords to his herd.

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“My dad used to raise Hereford females and run Charolais bulls,” Sargent said. “The last years that he was on the ranch, black Angus were popular in this area and he started producing black-on-black.”

Sargent thought the calves he and his father were raising out of the black Angus breeding were smaller than what he would like. Since cow/calf pairs are such a large part of his operation, he decided it would make sense to produce some bigger calves.

“We have about 470 cow/calf pairs,” Sargent said. “I’m the third generation here. I have cousins who ranch here too and we help each other out whenever we can.”

The traits Sargent liked about the Angus were their disposition and udders. What he wanted to add to the cattle he was producing was size and weight.

By the time he took over his father’s Winner, SD ranch at the age of 21, Craig Sargent knew what he liked in cattle and he wasn’t finding it in the black Angus his father had produced on their 1,500 acre operation. With a bit of research and investigation of neighboring ranchers, he decided to begin re-introducing Herefords to his herd.

“My dad used to raise Hereford females and run Charolais bulls,” Sargent said. “The last years that he was on the ranch, black Angus were popular in this area and he started producing black-on-black.”

Sargent thought the calves he and his father were raising out of the black Angus breeding were smaller than what he would like. Since cow/calf pairs are such a large part of his operation, he decided it would make sense to produce some bigger calves.

“We have about 470 cow/calf pairs,” Sargent said. “I’m the third generation here. I have cousins who ranch here too and we help each other out whenever we can.”

The traits Sargent liked about the Angus were their disposition and udders. What he wanted to add to the cattle he was producing was size and weight.

By the time he took over his father’s Winner, SD ranch at the age of 21, Craig Sargent knew what he liked in cattle and he wasn’t finding it in the black Angus his father had produced on their 1,500 acre operation. With a bit of research and investigation of neighboring ranchers, he decided to begin re-introducing Herefords to his herd.

“My dad used to raise Hereford females and run Charolais bulls,” Sargent said. “The last years that he was on the ranch, black Angus were popular in this area and he started producing black-on-black.”

Sargent thought the calves he and his father were raising out of the black Angus breeding were smaller than what he would like. Since cow/calf pairs are such a large part of his operation, he decided it would make sense to produce some bigger calves.

“We have about 470 cow/calf pairs,” Sargent said. “I’m the third generation here. I have cousins who ranch here too and we help each other out whenever we can.”

The traits Sargent liked about the Angus were their disposition and udders. What he wanted to add to the cattle he was producing was size and weight.

By the time he took over his father’s Winner, SD ranch at the age of 21, Craig Sargent knew what he liked in cattle and he wasn’t finding it in the black Angus his father had produced on their 1,500 acre operation. With a bit of research and investigation of neighboring ranchers, he decided to begin re-introducing Herefords to his herd.

“My dad used to raise Hereford females and run Charolais bulls,” Sargent said. “The last years that he was on the ranch, black Angus were popular in this area and he started producing black-on-black.”

Sargent thought the calves he and his father were raising out of the black Angus breeding were smaller than what he would like. Since cow/calf pairs are such a large part of his operation, he decided it would make sense to produce some bigger calves.

“We have about 470 cow/calf pairs,” Sargent said. “I’m the third generation here. I have cousins who ranch here too and we help each other out whenever we can.”

The traits Sargent liked about the Angus were their disposition and udders. What he wanted to add to the cattle he was producing was size and weight.