Barbed Wire by Doug Cooper: Stuck for years to come | TSLN.com
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Barbed Wire by Doug Cooper: Stuck for years to come

I got stuck in the mud a couple of days ago. Driving up a hill on a two track road, we slid into deep ruts and got high-centered on both the front and back axles. Of course, I had considered driving around this spot because it had captured several other vehicles over the years. But I had just used my considerable off-road driving knowledge and skill to get past two other nasty places and thought I was in the groove. Sitting there listening to the tires spin told me I was in trouble. Hoping for a miracle, I put the truck in reverse. It didn’t move an inch.

The only person I could reasonably expect to call for a rescue was sitting in the truck with me. My son just looked at me with pure disgust. He had tried to warn me. As we started to dig he reviewed the history of who else had gotten stuck in this place. I kept silent because I knew it was not a good time to mention that I had gotten stuck there before he was born.

After digging and jacking up various parts of the truck and stuffing rocks under the tires, we finally got out. We looked like we had done the butterfly stroke in a swamp. What mud wasn’t sticking to us was smeared inside the cab from the steering wheel to the door latches. It was the first time this particular truck had ever been stuck. The mud from our ranch can never be completely removed from any kind of machinery that it comes in contact with. This unlucky truck spent the first half of its life being driven on pavement by a retired guy who kept it in a garage and worried about thirty point maintence inspections. Now like Black Beauty, the truck is in the clutches of cruel masters who make it work in the mud.



The worst part about getting stuck is that there isn’t anyone else to blame. I have lost track of how many times I have taken a truck swimming in the creek or wedged into some dire predicament. I was still pulling my dad out of various jams he drove into when he was in his late eighties. My son better get used to it as I may have twenty or thirty more years left to get more trucks bogged down.


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