Brother, sister give back to Minnesota ag | TSLN.com

Brother, sister give back to Minnesota ag

Elaine Shein

Photo by Charles WormLouise Worm (right) helps students enrolled in Greenhouse Management at the Academy for Science and Agriculture, Minnesota's only public school dedicated to ag education

OMAHA (DTN) – Growing up on 25 acres of lakeshore property near Chaska, Minn., siblings Charles and Louise Worm watched as dairies and other farms became extinct. As tillable land and pastures disappeared, industrial parks and housing developments emerged on the land.

By the time they were out of high school, in the 1980s, their hometown had become another suburb for the Minneapolis area.

From that beginning of watching agriculture disappear, the brother and sister’s agricultural accomplishments, contributions and lifelong promotion of agriculture grew to gain state and national recognition.

Most recently, Louise was selected as one of the participants in class five of the Minnesota Agriculture and Rural Leadership Program that began last November and runs until April 2010. The participants have nine in-state seminars, followed by a six-day national study tour of Washington, D.C., and a 12-day international study tour.

Charles, 48, and Louise, 55, have continued to give back to the agricultural community, ranging from volunteer work with FFA, to consulting work with farmers, to teaching urban school kids more about agriculture and its importance.

OMAHA (DTN) – Growing up on 25 acres of lakeshore property near Chaska, Minn., siblings Charles and Louise Worm watched as dairies and other farms became extinct. As tillable land and pastures disappeared, industrial parks and housing developments emerged on the land.

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By the time they were out of high school, in the 1980s, their hometown had become another suburb for the Minneapolis area.

From that beginning of watching agriculture disappear, the brother and sister’s agricultural accomplishments, contributions and lifelong promotion of agriculture grew to gain state and national recognition.

Most recently, Louise was selected as one of the participants in class five of the Minnesota Agriculture and Rural Leadership Program that began last November and runs until April 2010. The participants have nine in-state seminars, followed by a six-day national study tour of Washington, D.C., and a 12-day international study tour.

Charles, 48, and Louise, 55, have continued to give back to the agricultural community, ranging from volunteer work with FFA, to consulting work with farmers, to teaching urban school kids more about agriculture and its importance.

OMAHA (DTN) – Growing up on 25 acres of lakeshore property near Chaska, Minn., siblings Charles and Louise Worm watched as dairies and other farms became extinct. As tillable land and pastures disappeared, industrial parks and housing developments emerged on the land.

By the time they were out of high school, in the 1980s, their hometown had become another suburb for the Minneapolis area.

From that beginning of watching agriculture disappear, the brother and sister’s agricultural accomplishments, contributions and lifelong promotion of agriculture grew to gain state and national recognition.

Most recently, Louise was selected as one of the participants in class five of the Minnesota Agriculture and Rural Leadership Program that began last November and runs until April 2010. The participants have nine in-state seminars, followed by a six-day national study tour of Washington, D.C., and a 12-day international study tour.

Charles, 48, and Louise, 55, have continued to give back to the agricultural community, ranging from volunteer work with FFA, to consulting work with farmers, to teaching urban school kids more about agriculture and its importance.

OMAHA (DTN) – Growing up on 25 acres of lakeshore property near Chaska, Minn., siblings Charles and Louise Worm watched as dairies and other farms became extinct. As tillable land and pastures disappeared, industrial parks and housing developments emerged on the land.

By the time they were out of high school, in the 1980s, their hometown had become another suburb for the Minneapolis area.

From that beginning of watching agriculture disappear, the brother and sister’s agricultural accomplishments, contributions and lifelong promotion of agriculture grew to gain state and national recognition.

Most recently, Louise was selected as one of the participants in class five of the Minnesota Agriculture and Rural Leadership Program that began last November and runs until April 2010. The participants have nine in-state seminars, followed by a six-day national study tour of Washington, D.C., and a 12-day international study tour.

Charles, 48, and Louise, 55, have continued to give back to the agricultural community, ranging from volunteer work with FFA, to consulting work with farmers, to teaching urban school kids more about agriculture and its importance.

elaine shein can be reached at elaine.shein@dtn.com