Buffalo Gold Rush: The Bison Advantage | TSLN.com

Buffalo Gold Rush: The Bison Advantage

Melissa Burke

All photos by Melissa BurkeHeifers at the Terry Bison Ranch feedlot.

Ninety people – including some from as far away as Florida, Texas, and Arizona – were in attendance at the “Buffalo Gold Rush – The Bison Advantage” workshop held Sept. 18th and 19th at the Terry Bison Ranch near Cheyenne, WY. It was an opportunity for existing producers to learn about different methods of bison husbandry as well as incentive for newcomers to enter the industry.

Following a welcoming address by Boyd Meyer (who owns approximately 3,100 head of bison at the Terry Ranch), a presentation was given by Bud Patterson of Patterson Nutrition Company in Sterling, CO. He has worked with both cattle and bison as well as with both range and feedlot animals. He discussed several co-products used in feeding rations. Some of these were corn co-products such as corn gluten feed and distillers grains. Corn gluten feed is a by-product of wet corn milling, which is the process of producing high fructose corn syrup. Distillers grains are a by-product of dry corn milling, which is the process of producing ethanol.

Corn co-products provide both protein and energy to feedlot rations. Both of these feeds contain high amounts of sulfur and phosphorus, however, so it is necessary to test the water for sulfates when utilizing them, as high sulfates are mineral antagonists. That is to say that they can affect levels of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium, and iron. Animals may stop drinking water and become dehydrated.

Another co-product is wet brewers grain, composed of mainly barley with a small amount of rice. Still another is the high fiber soybean hull. In general, co-products lower production costs while enhancing performance. Many of these products are of limited use elsewhere, and it is fortunate that the beef and bison industries are able to capitalize on what would otherwise be a burden to grain and food processors.

The next topic concerned veterinary care of bison. Dr. Gerald Parsons, DVM, of the Stratford Animal Clinic in Stratford, OK discussed internal and external parasites. He said that the further north you go, the less problems there will be with internal parasites. He also said that a healthy animal can tolerate a few parasites. When an animal is in trouble, though, the first thing that happens is that the hair becomes duller; it doesn’t have the shine that it should have. Then the animal noticeably loses weight and may even begin to have loose stools.

Dr. Parsons explained a few factors that can have adverse effects on parasite numbers. First is good moisture levels. Then make sure the population of animals is balanced. If need be, break up manure where bison have congregated, or even obtain more acreage if possible. Provide good nutrition and rotation grazing. Avoid stressing animals, such as by not breaking up family groups.

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Dr. Parsons also listed several ways to treat parasite infestations if they do occur. Worm the animals with ivermectin products, but be aware that feeding the product is not very effective because the weaker and more timid animals often won’t get to eat anyway. Pour-on wormers can be used but may not reach the skin due to bisons’ thick hair. Other options include injectable and drench wormers. As for repelling flies, a small amount of diesel mixed with the external treatment will help.

Ninety people – including some from as far away as Florida, Texas, and Arizona – were in attendance at the “Buffalo Gold Rush – The Bison Advantage” workshop held Sept. 18th and 19th at the Terry Bison Ranch near Cheyenne, WY. It was an opportunity for existing producers to learn about different methods of bison husbandry as well as incentive for newcomers to enter the industry.

Following a welcoming address by Boyd Meyer (who owns approximately 3,100 head of bison at the Terry Ranch), a presentation was given by Bud Patterson of Patterson Nutrition Company in Sterling, CO. He has worked with both cattle and bison as well as with both range and feedlot animals. He discussed several co-products used in feeding rations. Some of these were corn co-products such as corn gluten feed and distillers grains. Corn gluten feed is a by-product of wet corn milling, which is the process of producing high fructose corn syrup. Distillers grains are a by-product of dry corn milling, which is the process of producing ethanol.

Corn co-products provide both protein and energy to feedlot rations. Both of these feeds contain high amounts of sulfur and phosphorus, however, so it is necessary to test the water for sulfates when utilizing them, as high sulfates are mineral antagonists. That is to say that they can affect levels of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium, and iron. Animals may stop drinking water and become dehydrated.

Another co-product is wet brewers grain, composed of mainly barley with a small amount of rice. Still another is the high fiber soybean hull. In general, co-products lower production costs while enhancing performance. Many of these products are of limited use elsewhere, and it is fortunate that the beef and bison industries are able to capitalize on what would otherwise be a burden to grain and food processors.

The next topic concerned veterinary care of bison. Dr. Gerald Parsons, DVM, of the Stratford Animal Clinic in Stratford, OK discussed internal and external parasites. He said that the further north you go, the less problems there will be with internal parasites. He also said that a healthy animal can tolerate a few parasites. When an animal is in trouble, though, the first thing that happens is that the hair becomes duller; it doesn’t have the shine that it should have. Then the animal noticeably loses weight and may even begin to have loose stools.

Dr. Parsons explained a few factors that can have adverse effects on parasite numbers. First is good moisture levels. Then make sure the population of animals is balanced. If need be, break up manure where bison have congregated, or even obtain more acreage if possible. Provide good nutrition and rotation grazing. Avoid stressing animals, such as by not breaking up family groups.

Dr. Parsons also listed several ways to treat parasite infestations if they do occur. Worm the animals with ivermectin products, but be aware that feeding the product is not very effective because the weaker and more timid animals often won’t get to eat anyway. Pour-on wormers can be used but may not reach the skin due to bisons’ thick hair. Other options include injectable and drench wormers. As for repelling flies, a small amount of diesel mixed with the external treatment will help.

Ninety people – including some from as far away as Florida, Texas, and Arizona – were in attendance at the “Buffalo Gold Rush – The Bison Advantage” workshop held Sept. 18th and 19th at the Terry Bison Ranch near Cheyenne, WY. It was an opportunity for existing producers to learn about different methods of bison husbandry as well as incentive for newcomers to enter the industry.

Following a welcoming address by Boyd Meyer (who owns approximately 3,100 head of bison at the Terry Ranch), a presentation was given by Bud Patterson of Patterson Nutrition Company in Sterling, CO. He has worked with both cattle and bison as well as with both range and feedlot animals. He discussed several co-products used in feeding rations. Some of these were corn co-products such as corn gluten feed and distillers grains. Corn gluten feed is a by-product of wet corn milling, which is the process of producing high fructose corn syrup. Distillers grains are a by-product of dry corn milling, which is the process of producing ethanol.

Corn co-products provide both protein and energy to feedlot rations. Both of these feeds contain high amounts of sulfur and phosphorus, however, so it is necessary to test the water for sulfates when utilizing them, as high sulfates are mineral antagonists. That is to say that they can affect levels of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium, and iron. Animals may stop drinking water and become dehydrated.

Another co-product is wet brewers grain, composed of mainly barley with a small amount of rice. Still another is the high fiber soybean hull. In general, co-products lower production costs while enhancing performance. Many of these products are of limited use elsewhere, and it is fortunate that the beef and bison industries are able to capitalize on what would otherwise be a burden to grain and food processors.

The next topic concerned veterinary care of bison. Dr. Gerald Parsons, DVM, of the Stratford Animal Clinic in Stratford, OK discussed internal and external parasites. He said that the further north you go, the less problems there will be with internal parasites. He also said that a healthy animal can tolerate a few parasites. When an animal is in trouble, though, the first thing that happens is that the hair becomes duller; it doesn’t have the shine that it should have. Then the animal noticeably loses weight and may even begin to have loose stools.

Dr. Parsons explained a few factors that can have adverse effects on parasite numbers. First is good moisture levels. Then make sure the population of animals is balanced. If need be, break up manure where bison have congregated, or even obtain more acreage if possible. Provide good nutrition and rotation grazing. Avoid stressing animals, such as by not breaking up family groups.

Dr. Parsons also listed several ways to treat parasite infestations if they do occur. Worm the animals with ivermectin products, but be aware that feeding the product is not very effective because the weaker and more timid animals often won’t get to eat anyway. Pour-on wormers can be used but may not reach the skin due to bisons’ thick hair. Other options include injectable and drench wormers. As for repelling flies, a small amount of diesel mixed with the external treatment will help.

Ninety people – including some from as far away as Florida, Texas, and Arizona – were in attendance at the “Buffalo Gold Rush – The Bison Advantage” workshop held Sept. 18th and 19th at the Terry Bison Ranch near Cheyenne, WY. It was an opportunity for existing producers to learn about different methods of bison husbandry as well as incentive for newcomers to enter the industry.

Following a welcoming address by Boyd Meyer (who owns approximately 3,100 head of bison at the Terry Ranch), a presentation was given by Bud Patterson of Patterson Nutrition Company in Sterling, CO. He has worked with both cattle and bison as well as with both range and feedlot animals. He discussed several co-products used in feeding rations. Some of these were corn co-products such as corn gluten feed and distillers grains. Corn gluten feed is a by-product of wet corn milling, which is the process of producing high fructose corn syrup. Distillers grains are a by-product of dry corn milling, which is the process of producing ethanol.

Corn co-products provide both protein and energy to feedlot rations. Both of these feeds contain high amounts of sulfur and phosphorus, however, so it is necessary to test the water for sulfates when utilizing them, as high sulfates are mineral antagonists. That is to say that they can affect levels of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium, and iron. Animals may stop drinking water and become dehydrated.

Another co-product is wet brewers grain, composed of mainly barley with a small amount of rice. Still another is the high fiber soybean hull. In general, co-products lower production costs while enhancing performance. Many of these products are of limited use elsewhere, and it is fortunate that the beef and bison industries are able to capitalize on what would otherwise be a burden to grain and food processors.

The next topic concerned veterinary care of bison. Dr. Gerald Parsons, DVM, of the Stratford Animal Clinic in Stratford, OK discussed internal and external parasites. He said that the further north you go, the less problems there will be with internal parasites. He also said that a healthy animal can tolerate a few parasites. When an animal is in trouble, though, the first thing that happens is that the hair becomes duller; it doesn’t have the shine that it should have. Then the animal noticeably loses weight and may even begin to have loose stools.

Dr. Parsons explained a few factors that can have adverse effects on parasite numbers. First is good moisture levels. Then make sure the population of animals is balanced. If need be, break up manure where bison have congregated, or even obtain more acreage if possible. Provide good nutrition and rotation grazing. Avoid stressing animals, such as by not breaking up family groups.

Dr. Parsons also listed several ways to treat parasite infestations if they do occur. Worm the animals with ivermectin products, but be aware that feeding the product is not very effective because the weaker and more timid animals often won’t get to eat anyway. Pour-on wormers can be used but may not reach the skin due to bisons’ thick hair. Other options include injectable and drench wormers. As for repelling flies, a small amount of diesel mixed with the external treatment will help.

Ninety people – including some from as far away as Florida, Texas, and Arizona – were in attendance at the “Buffalo Gold Rush – The Bison Advantage” workshop held Sept. 18th and 19th at the Terry Bison Ranch near Cheyenne, WY. It was an opportunity for existing producers to learn about different methods of bison husbandry as well as incentive for newcomers to enter the industry.

Following a welcoming address by Boyd Meyer (who owns approximately 3,100 head of bison at the Terry Ranch), a presentation was given by Bud Patterson of Patterson Nutrition Company in Sterling, CO. He has worked with both cattle and bison as well as with both range and feedlot animals. He discussed several co-products used in feeding rations. Some of these were corn co-products such as corn gluten feed and distillers grains. Corn gluten feed is a by-product of wet corn milling, which is the process of producing high fructose corn syrup. Distillers grains are a by-product of dry corn milling, which is the process of producing ethanol.

Corn co-products provide both protein and energy to feedlot rations. Both of these feeds contain high amounts of sulfur and phosphorus, however, so it is necessary to test the water for sulfates when utilizing them, as high sulfates are mineral antagonists. That is to say that they can affect levels of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium, and iron. Animals may stop drinking water and become dehydrated.

Another co-product is wet brewers grain, composed of mainly barley with a small amount of rice. Still another is the high fiber soybean hull. In general, co-products lower production costs while enhancing performance. Many of these products are of limited use elsewhere, and it is fortunate that the beef and bison industries are able to capitalize on what would otherwise be a burden to grain and food processors.

The next topic concerned veterinary care of bison. Dr. Gerald Parsons, DVM, of the Stratford Animal Clinic in Stratford, OK discussed internal and external parasites. He said that the further north you go, the less problems there will be with internal parasites. He also said that a healthy animal can tolerate a few parasites. When an animal is in trouble, though, the first thing that happens is that the hair becomes duller; it doesn’t have the shine that it should have. Then the animal noticeably loses weight and may even begin to have loose stools.

Dr. Parsons explained a few factors that can have adverse effects on parasite numbers. First is good moisture levels. Then make sure the population of animals is balanced. If need be, break up manure where bison have congregated, or even obtain more acreage if possible. Provide good nutrition and rotation grazing. Avoid stressing animals, such as by not breaking up family groups.

Dr. Parsons also listed several ways to treat parasite infestations if they do occur. Worm the animals with ivermectin products, but be aware that feeding the product is not very effective because the weaker and more timid animals often won’t get to eat anyway. Pour-on wormers can be used but may not reach the skin due to bisons’ thick hair. Other options include injectable and drench wormers. As for repelling flies, a small amount of diesel mixed with the external treatment will help.

Ninety people – including some from as far away as Florida, Texas, and Arizona – were in attendance at the “Buffalo Gold Rush – The Bison Advantage” workshop held Sept. 18th and 19th at the Terry Bison Ranch near Cheyenne, WY. It was an opportunity for existing producers to learn about different methods of bison husbandry as well as incentive for newcomers to enter the industry.

Following a welcoming address by Boyd Meyer (who owns approximately 3,100 head of bison at the Terry Ranch), a presentation was given by Bud Patterson of Patterson Nutrition Company in Sterling, CO. He has worked with both cattle and bison as well as with both range and feedlot animals. He discussed several co-products used in feeding rations. Some of these were corn co-products such as corn gluten feed and distillers grains. Corn gluten feed is a by-product of wet corn milling, which is the process of producing high fructose corn syrup. Distillers grains are a by-product of dry corn milling, which is the process of producing ethanol.

Corn co-products provide both protein and energy to feedlot rations. Both of these feeds contain high amounts of sulfur and phosphorus, however, so it is necessary to test the water for sulfates when utilizing them, as high sulfates are mineral antagonists. That is to say that they can affect levels of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium, and iron. Animals may stop drinking water and become dehydrated.

Another co-product is wet brewers grain, composed of mainly barley with a small amount of rice. Still another is the high fiber soybean hull. In general, co-products lower production costs while enhancing performance. Many of these products are of limited use elsewhere, and it is fortunate that the beef and bison industries are able to capitalize on what would otherwise be a burden to grain and food processors.

The next topic concerned veterinary care of bison. Dr. Gerald Parsons, DVM, of the Stratford Animal Clinic in Stratford, OK discussed internal and external parasites. He said that the further north you go, the less problems there will be with internal parasites. He also said that a healthy animal can tolerate a few parasites. When an animal is in trouble, though, the first thing that happens is that the hair becomes duller; it doesn’t have the shine that it should have. Then the animal noticeably loses weight and may even begin to have loose stools.

Dr. Parsons explained a few factors that can have adverse effects on parasite numbers. First is good moisture levels. Then make sure the population of animals is balanced. If need be, break up manure where bison have congregated, or even obtain more acreage if possible. Provide good nutrition and rotation grazing. Avoid stressing animals, such as by not breaking up family groups.

Dr. Parsons also listed several ways to treat parasite infestations if they do occur. Worm the animals with ivermectin products, but be aware that feeding the product is not very effective because the weaker and more timid animals often won’t get to eat anyway. Pour-on wormers can be used but may not reach the skin due to bisons’ thick hair. Other options include injectable and drench wormers. As for repelling flies, a small amount of diesel mixed with the external treatment will help.

Ninety people – including some from as far away as Florida, Texas, and Arizona – were in attendance at the “Buffalo Gold Rush – The Bison Advantage” workshop held Sept. 18th and 19th at the Terry Bison Ranch near Cheyenne, WY. It was an opportunity for existing producers to learn about different methods of bison husbandry as well as incentive for newcomers to enter the industry.

Following a welcoming address by Boyd Meyer (who owns approximately 3,100 head of bison at the Terry Ranch), a presentation was given by Bud Patterson of Patterson Nutrition Company in Sterling, CO. He has worked with both cattle and bison as well as with both range and feedlot animals. He discussed several co-products used in feeding rations. Some of these were corn co-products such as corn gluten feed and distillers grains. Corn gluten feed is a by-product of wet corn milling, which is the process of producing high fructose corn syrup. Distillers grains are a by-product of dry corn milling, which is the process of producing ethanol.

Corn co-products provide both protein and energy to feedlot rations. Both of these feeds contain high amounts of sulfur and phosphorus, however, so it is necessary to test the water for sulfates when utilizing them, as high sulfates are mineral antagonists. That is to say that they can affect levels of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium, and iron. Animals may stop drinking water and become dehydrated.

Another co-product is wet brewers grain, composed of mainly barley with a small amount of rice. Still another is the high fiber soybean hull. In general, co-products lower production costs while enhancing performance. Many of these products are of limited use elsewhere, and it is fortunate that the beef and bison industries are able to capitalize on what would otherwise be a burden to grain and food processors.

The next topic concerned veterinary care of bison. Dr. Gerald Parsons, DVM, of the Stratford Animal Clinic in Stratford, OK discussed internal and external parasites. He said that the further north you go, the less problems there will be with internal parasites. He also said that a healthy animal can tolerate a few parasites. When an animal is in trouble, though, the first thing that happens is that the hair becomes duller; it doesn’t have the shine that it should have. Then the animal noticeably loses weight and may even begin to have loose stools.

Dr. Parsons explained a few factors that can have adverse effects on parasite numbers. First is good moisture levels. Then make sure the population of animals is balanced. If need be, break up manure where bison have congregated, or even obtain more acreage if possible. Provide good nutrition and rotation grazing. Avoid stressing animals, such as by not breaking up family groups.

Dr. Parsons also listed several ways to treat parasite infestations if they do occur. Worm the animals with ivermectin products, but be aware that feeding the product is not very effective because the weaker and more timid animals often won’t get to eat anyway. Pour-on wormers can be used but may not reach the skin due to bisons’ thick hair. Other options include injectable and drench wormers. As for repelling flies, a small amount of diesel mixed with the external treatment will help.