Children’s book by Amanda Radke portrays daily life on cattle ranch | TSLN.com
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Children’s book by Amanda Radke portrays daily life on cattle ranch

Original artwork by Michelle Weber
Levi’s Lost Calf |

MITCHELL, SD – Levi’s Lost Calf (ISBN 1463514425), an illustrated children’s book by Amanda Radke, offers young readers a glimpse of life on a South Dakota cattle ranch.

When a young boy, Levi, rides out one autumn morning with his family to roundup the cattle and bring them home from the pasture he quickly sees a number of familiar faces. But, Levi was surprised to learn that one calf was missing – Little Red, his favorite red heifer calf. Determined to find the calf and prove his independence, he begins to search with his horse Pepper and trusty dog Gus. The trio search high and low, all over the ranch. They examine the barn, the grain bin, the corn field and many more places you would imagine a calf might hide. In his hunt for Little Red, Levi discovers a whole world of fun, playful animals living on the ranch, and Levi invites the reader to help find the baby calf before the sun goes down.

“In a time where today’s consumers are three generations removed from the family farm, this book will introduce kids to ranchers who serve as stewards of the land and the caregivers to the many animals,” Radke said. “Readers will get to experience a real-life cowboy adventure, complete with horses, cattle and a new understanding for where our food comes from. Parents will enjoy the positive message of the book and might be reminded of the good old days when they may have visited Grandpa’s farm.”



Featuring original illustrations by cattle rancher Michelle Weber, the book is intended to inform and entertain young readers while helping them to understand what life is like on a cattle ranch. The book also features a kid-friendly recipe for Radke’s “Hungry Cowboy Tin Foil Dinner” and a glossary to help explain ranch terminology.

Levi’s Lost Calf is available for sale in paperback online at https://www.createspace.com/3612406.



MITCHELL, SD – Levi’s Lost Calf (ISBN 1463514425), an illustrated children’s book by Amanda Radke, offers young readers a glimpse of life on a South Dakota cattle ranch.

When a young boy, Levi, rides out one autumn morning with his family to roundup the cattle and bring them home from the pasture he quickly sees a number of familiar faces. But, Levi was surprised to learn that one calf was missing – Little Red, his favorite red heifer calf. Determined to find the calf and prove his independence, he begins to search with his horse Pepper and trusty dog Gus. The trio search high and low, all over the ranch. They examine the barn, the grain bin, the corn field and many more places you would imagine a calf might hide. In his hunt for Little Red, Levi discovers a whole world of fun, playful animals living on the ranch, and Levi invites the reader to help find the baby calf before the sun goes down.

“In a time where today’s consumers are three generations removed from the family farm, this book will introduce kids to ranchers who serve as stewards of the land and the caregivers to the many animals,” Radke said. “Readers will get to experience a real-life cowboy adventure, complete with horses, cattle and a new understanding for where our food comes from. Parents will enjoy the positive message of the book and might be reminded of the good old days when they may have visited Grandpa’s farm.”

Featuring original illustrations by cattle rancher Michelle Weber, the book is intended to inform and entertain young readers while helping them to understand what life is like on a cattle ranch. The book also features a kid-friendly recipe for Radke’s “Hungry Cowboy Tin Foil Dinner” and a glossary to help explain ranch terminology.

Levi’s Lost Calf is available for sale in paperback online at https://www.createspace.com/3612406.

MITCHELL, SD – Levi’s Lost Calf (ISBN 1463514425), an illustrated children’s book by Amanda Radke, offers young readers a glimpse of life on a South Dakota cattle ranch.

When a young boy, Levi, rides out one autumn morning with his family to roundup the cattle and bring them home from the pasture he quickly sees a number of familiar faces. But, Levi was surprised to learn that one calf was missing – Little Red, his favorite red heifer calf. Determined to find the calf and prove his independence, he begins to search with his horse Pepper and trusty dog Gus. The trio search high and low, all over the ranch. They examine the barn, the grain bin, the corn field and many more places you would imagine a calf might hide. In his hunt for Little Red, Levi discovers a whole world of fun, playful animals living on the ranch, and Levi invites the reader to help find the baby calf before the sun goes down.

“In a time where today’s consumers are three generations removed from the family farm, this book will introduce kids to ranchers who serve as stewards of the land and the caregivers to the many animals,” Radke said. “Readers will get to experience a real-life cowboy adventure, complete with horses, cattle and a new understanding for where our food comes from. Parents will enjoy the positive message of the book and might be reminded of the good old days when they may have visited Grandpa’s farm.”

Featuring original illustrations by cattle rancher Michelle Weber, the book is intended to inform and entertain young readers while helping them to understand what life is like on a cattle ranch. The book also features a kid-friendly recipe for Radke’s “Hungry Cowboy Tin Foil Dinner” and a glossary to help explain ranch terminology.

Levi’s Lost Calf is available for sale in paperback online at https://www.createspace.com/3612406.


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