College students opine on horse slaughter | TSLN.com

College students opine on horse slaughter

Amanda Nolz

Photo by Amanda NolzStudents at South Dakota State University in the Equine Issues and Leadership course taught by Rebecca Bott, Ph.D., offered their insights on the hot button topic of horse slaughter recently

In 1986, a horse named Ferdinand took the racing industry by storm. A Kentucky Derby winner, Ferdinand boasted a resume of $3.5 million in winnings. In the early 90s, Ferdinand was sold to Japan, but when he didn’t produce any talented offspring, he was sent to processing. Americans were outraged that their national hero was killed, and emotions ran high as the general public wondered why Japan didn’t notify the original owners before making a decision this huge.

That’s when society shifted its focus on the act of horse slaughter in the United States, and the discussion escalated until a decision was made in 2006. In that year, the House of Representatives passed the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, which prohibits horses to be processed for human consumption. In 2007, the last of the horse processing plants in the United States were closed, and today, more action is being pursued to limit the transportation of horses for processing to other countries.

Since that action has taken place, the debate from both sides has only increased, and students at South Dakota State University (SDSU) in the Equine Issues and Leadership course taught by Rebecca Bott, Ph.D., offered their insights on this hot button topic.

In 1986, a horse named Ferdinand took the racing industry by storm. A Kentucky Derby winner, Ferdinand boasted a resume of $3.5 million in winnings. In the early 90s, Ferdinand was sold to Japan, but when he didn’t produce any talented offspring, he was sent to processing. Americans were outraged that their national hero was killed, and emotions ran high as the general public wondered why Japan didn’t notify the original owners before making a decision this huge.

That’s when society shifted its focus on the act of horse slaughter in the United States, and the discussion escalated until a decision was made in 2006. In that year, the House of Representatives passed the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, which prohibits horses to be processed for human consumption. In 2007, the last of the horse processing plants in the United States were closed, and today, more action is being pursued to limit the transportation of horses for processing to other countries.

Since that action has taken place, the debate from both sides has only increased, and students at South Dakota State University (SDSU) in the Equine Issues and Leadership course taught by Rebecca Bott, Ph.D., offered their insights on this hot button topic.

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In 1986, a horse named Ferdinand took the racing industry by storm. A Kentucky Derby winner, Ferdinand boasted a resume of $3.5 million in winnings. In the early 90s, Ferdinand was sold to Japan, but when he didn’t produce any talented offspring, he was sent to processing. Americans were outraged that their national hero was killed, and emotions ran high as the general public wondered why Japan didn’t notify the original owners before making a decision this huge.

That’s when society shifted its focus on the act of horse slaughter in the United States, and the discussion escalated until a decision was made in 2006. In that year, the House of Representatives passed the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, which prohibits horses to be processed for human consumption. In 2007, the last of the horse processing plants in the United States were closed, and today, more action is being pursued to limit the transportation of horses for processing to other countries.

Since that action has taken place, the debate from both sides has only increased, and students at South Dakota State University (SDSU) in the Equine Issues and Leadership course taught by Rebecca Bott, Ph.D., offered their insights on this hot button topic.

In 1986, a horse named Ferdinand took the racing industry by storm. A Kentucky Derby winner, Ferdinand boasted a resume of $3.5 million in winnings. In the early 90s, Ferdinand was sold to Japan, but when he didn’t produce any talented offspring, he was sent to processing. Americans were outraged that their national hero was killed, and emotions ran high as the general public wondered why Japan didn’t notify the original owners before making a decision this huge.

That’s when society shifted its focus on the act of horse slaughter in the United States, and the discussion escalated until a decision was made in 2006. In that year, the House of Representatives passed the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, which prohibits horses to be processed for human consumption. In 2007, the last of the horse processing plants in the United States were closed, and today, more action is being pursued to limit the transportation of horses for processing to other countries.

Since that action has taken place, the debate from both sides has only increased, and students at South Dakota State University (SDSU) in the Equine Issues and Leadership course taught by Rebecca Bott, Ph.D., offered their insights on this hot button topic.