Community welcomes home fourth generation rancher | TSLN.com

Community welcomes home fourth generation rancher

Amanda Nolz

Photo courtesy Peg ZilverbergSeth in the sale ring at this year's Bar JZ bull sale.

HOLABIRD, SD – Most ranch kids can trace their heritage back to a lineage of food producers. In past generations, if a kid’s father were a rancher, he or she would more than likely grow up to be a rancher as well. Yet, today’s generation may have generations of ranchers in their family trees, but because of the many challenges facing producers today, they often opt to pursue big city careers in favor of returning to production agriculture.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), there are two times as many farmers over 65 as under 35 in the United States today. In addition, it is estimated that one-quarter of the nation’s farms will change hands in the next decade. Yet, it’s a rare occasion for a young person to return to production agriculture, which is why Seth Zilverberg is making headlines.

A 2006 graduate of South Dakota State University (SDSU), this dynamic young person dreamed of returning home to his family’s purebred cattle operation, Bar JZ Ranches, to continue his family’s tradition in beef production. The Bar JZ Ranch, near Holabird, has been in the family since 1928, and Zilverberg will be the fourth generation rancher to make a living off this homestead. So, it was a natural choice for Zilverberg to head home after graduation, but a job opportunity came along that he wasn’t quite anticipating.

HOLABIRD, SD – Most ranch kids can trace their heritage back to a lineage of food producers. In past generations, if a kid’s father were a rancher, he or she would more than likely grow up to be a rancher as well. Yet, today’s generation may have generations of ranchers in their family trees, but because of the many challenges facing producers today, they often opt to pursue big city careers in favor of returning to production agriculture.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), there are two times as many farmers over 65 as under 35 in the United States today. In addition, it is estimated that one-quarter of the nation’s farms will change hands in the next decade. Yet, it’s a rare occasion for a young person to return to production agriculture, which is why Seth Zilverberg is making headlines.

A 2006 graduate of South Dakota State University (SDSU), this dynamic young person dreamed of returning home to his family’s purebred cattle operation, Bar JZ Ranches, to continue his family’s tradition in beef production. The Bar JZ Ranch, near Holabird, has been in the family since 1928, and Zilverberg will be the fourth generation rancher to make a living off this homestead. So, it was a natural choice for Zilverberg to head home after graduation, but a job opportunity came along that he wasn’t quite anticipating.

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HOLABIRD, SD – Most ranch kids can trace their heritage back to a lineage of food producers. In past generations, if a kid’s father were a rancher, he or she would more than likely grow up to be a rancher as well. Yet, today’s generation may have generations of ranchers in their family trees, but because of the many challenges facing producers today, they often opt to pursue big city careers in favor of returning to production agriculture.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), there are two times as many farmers over 65 as under 35 in the United States today. In addition, it is estimated that one-quarter of the nation’s farms will change hands in the next decade. Yet, it’s a rare occasion for a young person to return to production agriculture, which is why Seth Zilverberg is making headlines.

A 2006 graduate of South Dakota State University (SDSU), this dynamic young person dreamed of returning home to his family’s purebred cattle operation, Bar JZ Ranches, to continue his family’s tradition in beef production. The Bar JZ Ranch, near Holabird, has been in the family since 1928, and Zilverberg will be the fourth generation rancher to make a living off this homestead. So, it was a natural choice for Zilverberg to head home after graduation, but a job opportunity came along that he wasn’t quite anticipating.