Cowboy Crooners | TSLN.com

Cowboy Crooners

Jeri L. Dobrowski

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

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Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”

Last month I touched on the difficulty of defining Western music. Often associated with cowboy music, fans would never lump them together with country and Western. While they share a common genesis, each has developed its own personality, much as any child might. To read what others are saying on the subject, rein on over to CowboyPoetry.com: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/whatiswesternmusic.htm. You’ll find submissions on the topic, along with a similar discussion on “What is cowboy poetry?”

But back to cowboy music… thumbing through CDs submitted for consideration, I selected three artists whose work falls within my personally-defined parameters. Each brings something different to the table: a Texas cowboy’s viewpoint, a hint of Nashville, a Montana rancher’s life experiences.

Gary Prescott was born and raised in deep South Texas. Working on his family’s ranch with 1,500-head of momma cows, he also rode bulls and bareback broncs. He explains: “For the first 23 years of my life, I was either riding horseback or riding a tractor. All I knew was cowboy. Then I went to work in the oil field to save up money for my own place. In 1993, I went to my first cowboy gathering. It was like coming home again.”