Dakota Cowboy Entrepreneurship | TSLN.com

Dakota Cowboy Entrepreneurship

All photos courtesy Cow Creek Ranch

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

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Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.

How many cowboys have spent time setting their horse on a ridge, lookin’ the country over and wonderin’ how a man could make money off tumbleweeds and prairie dogs? The deer are tearin’ down the haystacks and eatin’ feed he can’t afford, nor spare. The doggone pheasants and sharptail fly up under his colt and send him for a bronc ride. Wild turkeys are roosting over the yard ’till he daresn’t step outdoors barefooted. The juniper is takin’ the River brakes and the meadows are littered with the carcasses of drought-killed, deadfall cottonwoods.

Wise men have said we can’t change the wind, but we can always adjust our sails. In spite of such good advice, we often see only the bad side of situations. We view the dark and tangled threads behind the loom with distaste and turn away, without stepping around to discover the beautiful pattern of the tapestry as it appears from the other side.

In arid ranch country where every spear of grass is precious and there are often two or three mouths needing each spear, whatever takes up space or water or creates unhealthy shade to hinder the growth of grass is unwanted. In many areas evergreen trees – called juniper by some, cedar by others – proliferate and bunch up and take over a lot of good land that would be growing more feed for the livestock if they weren’t there, sucking priceless moisture from the ground.

People of faith believe there’s a ‘good side’ to every situation and, if we can’t see it alone, God will help us see it. Glendon and Pam Shearer who ranch near Wall, SD are people of faith. They’ve always looked for the good side and believed in silver linings. They were reluctant to accept the reality that their business of raising horses and cattle on their ranch, beloved to them as a family, was not large enough to provide a living for another generation.

Both Colby and Trent, after a few years away from home, wanted to return and rear their kids where they’d been reared, along the beautiful Cheyenne River. Both believed there should be some way that could happen. Their dad Glendon says, “I spent a lot of time praying about it.” No doubt the rest of the family was helping him.