Days of ’76 ground breaking ceremony held September 28 | TSLN.com
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Days of ’76 ground breaking ceremony held September 28

Alaina Mousel, editor

A ground breaking ceremony for the new Days of ’76 museum took place adjacent to the rodeo grounds Tuesday, Sept. 28, in Deadwood, SD.

Formerly the museum resembled a pole barn that housed historic horse-drawn vehicles and rodeo paraphernalia. Well-known to the museum is the Clowser Collection and authentic horse-drawn vehicles including the original Deadwood Stage.

The pole building and trees that surrounded it no longer stands as construction commences adjacent to the Days of ’76 rodeo grounds. During construction, the museum treasures are safely stored in a different location.

The effort to raise $6 million for a new 32,000-ft. museum took four years to complete and was made possible by many donations including gifts from the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission and the Adams Mastrovich Family Foundation.

Deadwood Chamber of Commerce president Pat Roberts welcomed the crowd to the ground breaking ceremony and emceed the event. Other speakers at the ceremony included: Francis Toscana, mayor of Deadwood; Darin Derosier, chairman of the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission (HPC); Jon Mattson, president of the Days of ’76 Museum; Darrell Shoemaker from Senator Tim Johnson’s office, Save America’s Treasures Program; Ron Island, Adams Mastrovich Family Foundation; Mike Trucano, SD Department of Transportation; and Shelly Larson, Business Development Representative from the Governor’s Office of Economic Development.

“I would like to congratulate the committee for the fortitude, vision and stick-to-it-ness. A lot of people need to be thanked,” Deadwood Mayor Francis Toscana said at the ceremony. He pointed out how the Days of ’76 committee endured the marathon needed to secure funding for the new museum. He said HPC stepped up with $3 million towards the effort. “This will mean an awful lot to this community. It will be a ‘world class museum’ and a whole new opportunity for people to come here,” Toscana concluded.

Days of ’76 Museum president Jon Mattson said the real work behind the museum began more than a decade ago. He read a letter Don Clowser wrote ten years ago that praised the Days of ’76 Museum board for their dedication in preserving history, and the Days of ’76 rodeo committee and Deadwood community in retrieving bricks from Deadwood’s main street to place under carriages in the museum. Those bricks are safely stored until the new museum is completed.

“Eighteen months from now, you will be able to look out at the grandstands and arena, then go through the museum to see all of the history that happened in that arena,” Mattson said.

“We have enough funding for the building,” Mattson said. “But we still need to raise funds for the exhibits.”

Mattson noted that the Days of ’76 Rodeo has won the PRCA Outdoor Rodeo of the Year for the past 11 years, and has been nominated again in 2010. Days of ’76 will find out in December if they took home the title again.

Sarah Carlson sang “Black Hills of Dakota” as musical entertainment prior to dignitaries grabbing shovels for the ceremonial “dig in.”

Architect for the new Days of ’76 is Lund & Associates of Rapid City, SD; consulting architect is Chamberlain Architects of Rapid City and Grand Junction, CO; upper level exhibit designed by Condit Designs of Denver, CO. Contractor for the project is J. Scull Construction of Rapid City.

A ground breaking ceremony for the new Days of ’76 museum took place adjacent to the rodeo grounds Tuesday, Sept. 28, in Deadwood, SD.

Formerly the museum resembled a pole barn that housed historic horse-drawn vehicles and rodeo paraphernalia. Well-known to the museum is the Clowser Collection and authentic horse-drawn vehicles including the original Deadwood Stage.

The pole building and trees that surrounded it no longer stands as construction commences adjacent to the Days of ’76 rodeo grounds. During construction, the museum treasures are safely stored in a different location.

The effort to raise $6 million for a new 32,000-ft. museum took four years to complete and was made possible by many donations including gifts from the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission and the Adams Mastrovich Family Foundation.

Deadwood Chamber of Commerce president Pat Roberts welcomed the crowd to the ground breaking ceremony and emceed the event. Other speakers at the ceremony included: Francis Toscana, mayor of Deadwood; Darin Derosier, chairman of the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission (HPC); Jon Mattson, president of the Days of ’76 Museum; Darrell Shoemaker from Senator Tim Johnson’s office, Save America’s Treasures Program; Ron Island, Adams Mastrovich Family Foundation; Mike Trucano, SD Department of Transportation; and Shelly Larson, Business Development Representative from the Governor’s Office of Economic Development.

“I would like to congratulate the committee for the fortitude, vision and stick-to-it-ness. A lot of people need to be thanked,” Deadwood Mayor Francis Toscana said at the ceremony. He pointed out how the Days of ’76 committee endured the marathon needed to secure funding for the new museum. He said HPC stepped up with $3 million towards the effort. “This will mean an awful lot to this community. It will be a ‘world class museum’ and a whole new opportunity for people to come here,” Toscana concluded.

Days of ’76 Museum president Jon Mattson said the real work behind the museum began more than a decade ago. He read a letter Don Clowser wrote ten years ago that praised the Days of ’76 Museum board for their dedication in preserving history, and the Days of ’76 rodeo committee and Deadwood community in retrieving bricks from Deadwood’s main street to place under carriages in the museum. Those bricks are safely stored until the new museum is completed.

“Eighteen months from now, you will be able to look out at the grandstands and arena, then go through the museum to see all of the history that happened in that arena,” Mattson said.

“We have enough funding for the building,” Mattson said. “But we still need to raise funds for the exhibits.”

Mattson noted that the Days of ’76 Rodeo has won the PRCA Outdoor Rodeo of the Year for the past 11 years, and has been nominated again in 2010. Days of ’76 will find out in December if they took home the title again.

Sarah Carlson sang “Black Hills of Dakota” as musical entertainment prior to dignitaries grabbing shovels for the ceremonial “dig in.”

Architect for the new Days of ’76 is Lund & Associates of Rapid City, SD; consulting architect is Chamberlain Architects of Rapid City and Grand Junction, CO; upper level exhibit designed by Condit Designs of Denver, CO. Contractor for the project is J. Scull Construction of Rapid City.

A ground breaking ceremony for the new Days of ’76 museum took place adjacent to the rodeo grounds Tuesday, Sept. 28, in Deadwood, SD.

Formerly the museum resembled a pole barn that housed historic horse-drawn vehicles and rodeo paraphernalia. Well-known to the museum is the Clowser Collection and authentic horse-drawn vehicles including the original Deadwood Stage.

The pole building and trees that surrounded it no longer stands as construction commences adjacent to the Days of ’76 rodeo grounds. During construction, the museum treasures are safely stored in a different location.

The effort to raise $6 million for a new 32,000-ft. museum took four years to complete and was made possible by many donations including gifts from the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission and the Adams Mastrovich Family Foundation.

Deadwood Chamber of Commerce president Pat Roberts welcomed the crowd to the ground breaking ceremony and emceed the event. Other speakers at the ceremony included: Francis Toscana, mayor of Deadwood; Darin Derosier, chairman of the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission (HPC); Jon Mattson, president of the Days of ’76 Museum; Darrell Shoemaker from Senator Tim Johnson’s office, Save America’s Treasures Program; Ron Island, Adams Mastrovich Family Foundation; Mike Trucano, SD Department of Transportation; and Shelly Larson, Business Development Representative from the Governor’s Office of Economic Development.

“I would like to congratulate the committee for the fortitude, vision and stick-to-it-ness. A lot of people need to be thanked,” Deadwood Mayor Francis Toscana said at the ceremony. He pointed out how the Days of ’76 committee endured the marathon needed to secure funding for the new museum. He said HPC stepped up with $3 million towards the effort. “This will mean an awful lot to this community. It will be a ‘world class museum’ and a whole new opportunity for people to come here,” Toscana concluded.

Days of ’76 Museum president Jon Mattson said the real work behind the museum began more than a decade ago. He read a letter Don Clowser wrote ten years ago that praised the Days of ’76 Museum board for their dedication in preserving history, and the Days of ’76 rodeo committee and Deadwood community in retrieving bricks from Deadwood’s main street to place under carriages in the museum. Those bricks are safely stored until the new museum is completed.

“Eighteen months from now, you will be able to look out at the grandstands and arena, then go through the museum to see all of the history that happened in that arena,” Mattson said.

“We have enough funding for the building,” Mattson said. “But we still need to raise funds for the exhibits.”

Mattson noted that the Days of ’76 Rodeo has won the PRCA Outdoor Rodeo of the Year for the past 11 years, and has been nominated again in 2010. Days of ’76 will find out in December if they took home the title again.

Sarah Carlson sang “Black Hills of Dakota” as musical entertainment prior to dignitaries grabbing shovels for the ceremonial “dig in.”

Architect for the new Days of ’76 is Lund & Associates of Rapid City, SD; consulting architect is Chamberlain Architects of Rapid City and Grand Junction, CO; upper level exhibit designed by Condit Designs of Denver, CO. Contractor for the project is J. Scull Construction of Rapid City.


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