Disposition, docility | TSLN.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Disposition, docility

Courtesy photoCorey Gall of Tripp, SD, has been pleased with the docile nature and strong maternal traits he's developed in his 50-head Red Angus cow herd.

Buy Photo

The days when Red Angus cattle were discounted at sale barns are quickly fading away and Red Angus breeder Corey Gall of Tripp, SD can easily explain what made him start cultivating his own 50 head herd of red hides.

“Disposition,” he quickly states. “Add to that the same strong maternal and carcass qualities of this breed and I can’t see any reason not to raise this breed of cattle.”

In starting his herd, Gall noticed a Red Angus ad in a magazine in the mid-1990s that mentioned the word “docility.” He made a call to the Red Angus Association and they promptly pointed him in the direction of a Red Angus breeder who was selling down due to his age.



“When I visited the breeder and we walked out amongst his cows, I couldn’t believe that they just stood there and stared at us,” Gall says. “We took a tour through his replacement heifers and bulls. Some allowed us to scratch on them and numerous calves came up and licked on our jackets. After that experience I was hooked and purchased my first group of Red Angus cows that same day.”

It wasn’t until calving time that Gall could really see the docility of the Red Angus cattle.



“When the first red cow calved, I made sure there was plenty room between the cow and the calf I was gonna’ tag,” he says. “I approached the calf, and the cow slowly walked up to see what I was gonna’ do to her baby. I was able to tag the calf without a confrontation. To say the least, I was ecstatic.

“I’m not a fad chaser” Gall says. “The fad in most breeds now is to breed for smaller framed carcass type animals. On our farm we’ve decided to stick with the frame score 6.25 to 6.5 animals. It’s a happy medium between the short framed cattle that are starting to develop and the big monsters that were being bred in the 80s.”

Gall has fed cattle out of his genetics alongside some calves purchased out of some of the famous “CARCASS” bulls another breeder raised.

“The results spoke for themselves,” he says. “Our larger cattle finished at 14.5 months of age, graded better, had larger rib-eyes and were on feed for 75 days less than the ‘carcass calves.’ We lost $125 per head on the second pen of cattle, due to more time on feed, yardage and interest. It just proves that time is money and in this business we are all scratching to save money any way we can.”

Gall describes himself as a person who likes to look “outside the box” when it comes to using different genetics.

“My cowherd base goes back to Logan, King Rob, Avalanche and Monu 4X 303, which are tried and true genetics,” he says. “However I don’t feel the genetics being produced in the U.S. today with a 5 frame score will find a fit in my herd. In the last few years I’ve started incorporating Canadian bloodlines and I’m really impressed with the results.”

Some of the bloodlines Gall has incorporated into his herd include Sakic, Fully Loaded and Mulberry. He notes that he “couldn’t be any happier with results of the matings.”

Gall predicts that continuous breeding of small framed animals will lead to small, frail-boned animals that will have calving issues once “the fad” turns to a larger framed animal again.

“Our cows calf in a pasture with no facilities to get a cow in to pull a calf,” Gall says. “Our cows have to calf out on their own, and unless the calf presentation is wrong, we don’t assist them. We use bulls that are built with heifer heads, clean front shoulders and have good length of spine. I feel that the majority of the time, these characteristics have more to do with calving ease than birth weight.”

Gall also says he’s looking forward to his joint production sale in Presho, SD. “We’re going to have a sale with Tim Nemec of Midland on February 20,” Gall says. “It’s a long story on how this sale has come together, but Tim’s cattle complement ours and I’m very excited to be working with him. He has a spring calving cowherd and our cows calve in the fall so we will have a great selection of spring bulls and I have age-advantaged fall bulls. Basically we will have bulls that will fit anyone’s needs.”

In the future, Gall says he’d like to continue growing his herd up to 75 or 80 head.

“My kids are getting older and are looking forward to helping out,” he says. “My 11-year-old is already helping sort during weaning time and breeding times, which again just speaks for the disposition of our cows. You may see kids his age out west river helping out, but around here too many kids have taken up video games and are not out there helping dad. Dads need to get their kids out there when the child is younger if they wish to keep the business in the family. Too many kids are discouraged to help and are basically told that the better life is in the big city. I have lived in larger cities and I’m just not sold on the idea. I believe my kids will stay close to home, and help out with the cattle, if not have herds of their own some day. There are a lot of positives and negatives in the beef industry right now, but hopefully its something that my kids will continue to enjoy and want to continue.”

The days when Red Angus cattle were discounted at sale barns are quickly fading away and Red Angus breeder Corey Gall of Tripp, SD can easily explain what made him start cultivating his own 50 head herd of red hides.

“Disposition,” he quickly states. “Add to that the same strong maternal and carcass qualities of this breed and I can’t see any reason not to raise this breed of cattle.”

In starting his herd, Gall noticed a Red Angus ad in a magazine in the mid-1990s that mentioned the word “docility.” He made a call to the Red Angus Association and they promptly pointed him in the direction of a Red Angus breeder who was selling down due to his age.

“When I visited the breeder and we walked out amongst his cows, I couldn’t believe that they just stood there and stared at us,” Gall says. “We took a tour through his replacement heifers and bulls. Some allowed us to scratch on them and numerous calves came up and licked on our jackets. After that experience I was hooked and purchased my first group of Red Angus cows that same day.”

It wasn’t until calving time that Gall could really see the docility of the Red Angus cattle.

“When the first red cow calved, I made sure there was plenty room between the cow and the calf I was gonna’ tag,” he says. “I approached the calf, and the cow slowly walked up to see what I was gonna’ do to her baby. I was able to tag the calf without a confrontation. To say the least, I was ecstatic.

“I’m not a fad chaser” Gall says. “The fad in most breeds now is to breed for smaller framed carcass type animals. On our farm we’ve decided to stick with the frame score 6.25 to 6.5 animals. It’s a happy medium between the short framed cattle that are starting to develop and the big monsters that were being bred in the 80s.”

Gall has fed cattle out of his genetics alongside some calves purchased out of some of the famous “CARCASS” bulls another breeder raised.

“The results spoke for themselves,” he says. “Our larger cattle finished at 14.5 months of age, graded better, had larger rib-eyes and were on feed for 75 days less than the ‘carcass calves.’ We lost $125 per head on the second pen of cattle, due to more time on feed, yardage and interest. It just proves that time is money and in this business we are all scratching to save money any way we can.”

Gall describes himself as a person who likes to look “outside the box” when it comes to using different genetics.

“My cowherd base goes back to Logan, King Rob, Avalanche and Monu 4X 303, which are tried and true genetics,” he says. “However I don’t feel the genetics being produced in the U.S. today with a 5 frame score will find a fit in my herd. In the last few years I’ve started incorporating Canadian bloodlines and I’m really impressed with the results.”

Some of the bloodlines Gall has incorporated into his herd include Sakic, Fully Loaded and Mulberry. He notes that he “couldn’t be any happier with results of the matings.”

Gall predicts that continuous breeding of small framed animals will lead to small, frail-boned animals that will have calving issues once “the fad” turns to a larger framed animal again.

“Our cows calf in a pasture with no facilities to get a cow in to pull a calf,” Gall says. “Our cows have to calf out on their own, and unless the calf presentation is wrong, we don’t assist them. We use bulls that are built with heifer heads, clean front shoulders and have good length of spine. I feel that the majority of the time, these characteristics have more to do with calving ease than birth weight.”

Gall also says he’s looking forward to his joint production sale in Presho, SD. “We’re going to have a sale with Tim Nemec of Midland on February 20,” Gall says. “It’s a long story on how this sale has come together, but Tim’s cattle complement ours and I’m very excited to be working with him. He has a spring calving cowherd and our cows calve in the fall so we will have a great selection of spring bulls and I have age-advantaged fall bulls. Basically we will have bulls that will fit anyone’s needs.”

In the future, Gall says he’d like to continue growing his herd up to 75 or 80 head.

“My kids are getting older and are looking forward to helping out,” he says. “My 11-year-old is already helping sort during weaning time and breeding times, which again just speaks for the disposition of our cows. You may see kids his age out west river helping out, but around here too many kids have taken up video games and are not out there helping dad. Dads need to get their kids out there when the child is younger if they wish to keep the business in the family. Too many kids are discouraged to help and are basically told that the better life is in the big city. I have lived in larger cities and I’m just not sold on the idea. I believe my kids will stay close to home, and help out with the cattle, if not have herds of their own some day. There are a lot of positives and negatives in the beef industry right now, but hopefully its something that my kids will continue to enjoy and want to continue.”


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User