Dustin Reinesch: Improving equine performance through massage | TSLN.com
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Dustin Reinesch: Improving equine performance through massage

Photo by Amanda Radke"The back end of the horse is the power house, and the front end is used for steering. Once a horse is hurt in the back, they will overcompensate by using the front; this leads to bigger injuries in the long run," explained Dustin Reinesch.

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After a hard day of riding in the saddle working calves, most cowboys are tired and sore, although few would admit it. Horses are the same way. Stress and hard work can wear and tear on even the best of horses, and the use of equine massage therapy to alleviate some of that pain is gaining in popularity.

For Dustin Reinesch of White Lake, SD, all it took was one clinic with certified equine massage and alignment therapist Randy Hapney, and he knew it was a career path he wanted to pursue.

Having been around horses all his life, Reinesch is a natural for the trade. He began riding horses at age six, and through the years, he was involved in 4-H, high school and college rodeo, competing in calf roping, team roping, flag racing and goat tying. After graduating from Mitchell Technical Institute (MTI) in May 2010, Reinesch returned to the family farm and started expanding his equine massage work around the area.

After a hard day of riding in the saddle working calves, most cowboys are tired and sore, although few would admit it. Horses are the same way. Stress and hard work can wear and tear on even the best of horses, and the use of equine massage therapy to alleviate some of that pain is gaining in popularity.

For Dustin Reinesch of White Lake, SD, all it took was one clinic with certified equine massage and alignment therapist Randy Hapney, and he knew it was a career path he wanted to pursue.

Having been around horses all his life, Reinesch is a natural for the trade. He began riding horses at age six, and through the years, he was involved in 4-H, high school and college rodeo, competing in calf roping, team roping, flag racing and goat tying. After graduating from Mitchell Technical Institute (MTI) in May 2010, Reinesch returned to the family farm and started expanding his equine massage work around the area.

After a hard day of riding in the saddle working calves, most cowboys are tired and sore, although few would admit it. Horses are the same way. Stress and hard work can wear and tear on even the best of horses, and the use of equine massage therapy to alleviate some of that pain is gaining in popularity.

For Dustin Reinesch of White Lake, SD, all it took was one clinic with certified equine massage and alignment therapist Randy Hapney, and he knew it was a career path he wanted to pursue.

Having been around horses all his life, Reinesch is a natural for the trade. He began riding horses at age six, and through the years, he was involved in 4-H, high school and college rodeo, competing in calf roping, team roping, flag racing and goat tying. After graduating from Mitchell Technical Institute (MTI) in May 2010, Reinesch returned to the family farm and started expanding his equine massage work around the area.

editor’s note: contact reinesch for equine massage and alignment therapy at ddr2008@hotmail.com.


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