Equine enjoyment | TSLN.com

Equine enjoyment

Loretta Sorensen

Photo by Loretta SorensenDr. Steve Tornberg has designed a multi-building clinic that allows him and his fellow veterinarians to provide a wide range of care for horses.

HARRISBURG, SD – After completing his internship at Littleton Large Animal Clinic in Littleton, CO, Dr. Steve Tornberg knew he wanted his own large animal practice where he could care for horses. He’s been treating, breeding and working with horses and a variety of other livestock and animals at Dakota Large Animal Clinic since May 1981.

“Probably 90 percent of what we do here is equine related,” Dr. Tornberg says. “Veterinarians Michelle Jensen and Nathan Earl work with me and we employ three registered technicians and six to seven other support staff members. When I decided to move back here after practicing in Colorado, I was used to doing equine work and lots of it. Horses have been our primary business here since the clinic opened.”

Tornberg felt like he was coming home when he opened his clinic in Harrisburg, SD. He grew up in Beresford, which is 30 miles south of his business. He designed his clinic to include a variety of stalls and paddocks. He also has two small pastures he utilizes for horse owners who bring their mares in to be bred.

“It’s not unusual during breeding season to hospitalize and board somewhere between 50 and 60 horses a day,” he says. “We can get cooled, fresh semen from most stallions in the country within 24 to 48 hours. Many clients take advantage of this service to breed their mares. We also offer embryo transfers, foaling mare monitoring and neonatal services. We stand stallions at the clinic and offer live cover, artificial breeding and shipped semen services.”

While most horses foal without any difficulty, Tornberg and his associates offer horse owners some tips to ensure that the mare and foal come through the process healthy and well.

“People should write down the veterinarian’s phone number well in advance of the date they expect the mare to foal,” Tornberg says. “It’s important, too, that they have a watch or clock on hand when they’re timing each stage of the labor. It’s easy to lose track of time if you get worried or anxious about the birth.”

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HARRISBURG, SD – After completing his internship at Littleton Large Animal Clinic in Littleton, CO, Dr. Steve Tornberg knew he wanted his own large animal practice where he could care for horses. He’s been treating, breeding and working with horses and a variety of other livestock and animals at Dakota Large Animal Clinic since May 1981.

“Probably 90 percent of what we do here is equine related,” Dr. Tornberg says. “Veterinarians Michelle Jensen and Nathan Earl work with me and we employ three registered technicians and six to seven other support staff members. When I decided to move back here after practicing in Colorado, I was used to doing equine work and lots of it. Horses have been our primary business here since the clinic opened.”

Tornberg felt like he was coming home when he opened his clinic in Harrisburg, SD. He grew up in Beresford, which is 30 miles south of his business. He designed his clinic to include a variety of stalls and paddocks. He also has two small pastures he utilizes for horse owners who bring their mares in to be bred.

“It’s not unusual during breeding season to hospitalize and board somewhere between 50 and 60 horses a day,” he says. “We can get cooled, fresh semen from most stallions in the country within 24 to 48 hours. Many clients take advantage of this service to breed their mares. We also offer embryo transfers, foaling mare monitoring and neonatal services. We stand stallions at the clinic and offer live cover, artificial breeding and shipped semen services.”

While most horses foal without any difficulty, Tornberg and his associates offer horse owners some tips to ensure that the mare and foal come through the process healthy and well.

“People should write down the veterinarian’s phone number well in advance of the date they expect the mare to foal,” Tornberg says. “It’s important, too, that they have a watch or clock on hand when they’re timing each stage of the labor. It’s easy to lose track of time if you get worried or anxious about the birth.”

HARRISBURG, SD – After completing his internship at Littleton Large Animal Clinic in Littleton, CO, Dr. Steve Tornberg knew he wanted his own large animal practice where he could care for horses. He’s been treating, breeding and working with horses and a variety of other livestock and animals at Dakota Large Animal Clinic since May 1981.

“Probably 90 percent of what we do here is equine related,” Dr. Tornberg says. “Veterinarians Michelle Jensen and Nathan Earl work with me and we employ three registered technicians and six to seven other support staff members. When I decided to move back here after practicing in Colorado, I was used to doing equine work and lots of it. Horses have been our primary business here since the clinic opened.”

Tornberg felt like he was coming home when he opened his clinic in Harrisburg, SD. He grew up in Beresford, which is 30 miles south of his business. He designed his clinic to include a variety of stalls and paddocks. He also has two small pastures he utilizes for horse owners who bring their mares in to be bred.

“It’s not unusual during breeding season to hospitalize and board somewhere between 50 and 60 horses a day,” he says. “We can get cooled, fresh semen from most stallions in the country within 24 to 48 hours. Many clients take advantage of this service to breed their mares. We also offer embryo transfers, foaling mare monitoring and neonatal services. We stand stallions at the clinic and offer live cover, artificial breeding and shipped semen services.”

While most horses foal without any difficulty, Tornberg and his associates offer horse owners some tips to ensure that the mare and foal come through the process healthy and well.

“People should write down the veterinarian’s phone number well in advance of the date they expect the mare to foal,” Tornberg says. “It’s important, too, that they have a watch or clock on hand when they’re timing each stage of the labor. It’s easy to lose track of time if you get worried or anxious about the birth.”

HARRISBURG, SD – After completing his internship at Littleton Large Animal Clinic in Littleton, CO, Dr. Steve Tornberg knew he wanted his own large animal practice where he could care for horses. He’s been treating, breeding and working with horses and a variety of other livestock and animals at Dakota Large Animal Clinic since May 1981.

“Probably 90 percent of what we do here is equine related,” Dr. Tornberg says. “Veterinarians Michelle Jensen and Nathan Earl work with me and we employ three registered technicians and six to seven other support staff members. When I decided to move back here after practicing in Colorado, I was used to doing equine work and lots of it. Horses have been our primary business here since the clinic opened.”

Tornberg felt like he was coming home when he opened his clinic in Harrisburg, SD. He grew up in Beresford, which is 30 miles south of his business. He designed his clinic to include a variety of stalls and paddocks. He also has two small pastures he utilizes for horse owners who bring their mares in to be bred.

“It’s not unusual during breeding season to hospitalize and board somewhere between 50 and 60 horses a day,” he says. “We can get cooled, fresh semen from most stallions in the country within 24 to 48 hours. Many clients take advantage of this service to breed their mares. We also offer embryo transfers, foaling mare monitoring and neonatal services. We stand stallions at the clinic and offer live cover, artificial breeding and shipped semen services.”

While most horses foal without any difficulty, Tornberg and his associates offer horse owners some tips to ensure that the mare and foal come through the process healthy and well.

“People should write down the veterinarian’s phone number well in advance of the date they expect the mare to foal,” Tornberg says. “It’s important, too, that they have a watch or clock on hand when they’re timing each stage of the labor. It’s easy to lose track of time if you get worried or anxious about the birth.”

HARRISBURG, SD – After completing his internship at Littleton Large Animal Clinic in Littleton, CO, Dr. Steve Tornberg knew he wanted his own large animal practice where he could care for horses. He’s been treating, breeding and working with horses and a variety of other livestock and animals at Dakota Large Animal Clinic since May 1981.

“Probably 90 percent of what we do here is equine related,” Dr. Tornberg says. “Veterinarians Michelle Jensen and Nathan Earl work with me and we employ three registered technicians and six to seven other support staff members. When I decided to move back here after practicing in Colorado, I was used to doing equine work and lots of it. Horses have been our primary business here since the clinic opened.”

Tornberg felt like he was coming home when he opened his clinic in Harrisburg, SD. He grew up in Beresford, which is 30 miles south of his business. He designed his clinic to include a variety of stalls and paddocks. He also has two small pastures he utilizes for horse owners who bring their mares in to be bred.

“It’s not unusual during breeding season to hospitalize and board somewhere between 50 and 60 horses a day,” he says. “We can get cooled, fresh semen from most stallions in the country within 24 to 48 hours. Many clients take advantage of this service to breed their mares. We also offer embryo transfers, foaling mare monitoring and neonatal services. We stand stallions at the clinic and offer live cover, artificial breeding and shipped semen services.”

While most horses foal without any difficulty, Tornberg and his associates offer horse owners some tips to ensure that the mare and foal come through the process healthy and well.

“People should write down the veterinarian’s phone number well in advance of the date they expect the mare to foal,” Tornberg says. “It’s important, too, that they have a watch or clock on hand when they’re timing each stage of the labor. It’s easy to lose track of time if you get worried or anxious about the birth.”