Feeding value of light test weight corn | TSLN.com

Feeding value of light test weight corn

Steve Paisley

Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, University of Wyoming

Fall has presented several challenges for corn producers in the northern great plains. While corn prices dropped from their summer record highs, much of the corn remained in the field, seemingly refusing to dry down to acceptable moisture levels. For those that are fortunate enough to be completing corn harvest, light test weights have also created marketing problems for many producers. During the last three weeks, several operators have had corn severely docked, or refused, due to light test weights.

Bushel test weights are an important component for the USDA grain grading system (Table 1). Bushel weights are an indicator of the maturity and quality of the crop harvested, and meeting the established requirements is a critical component for establishing price and fair trading of grain commodities. Test weights are an indicator of the starch level within the kernel, as well as relative proportions of fiber, ash, starch, and oil as they relate to stage of maturity of the grain.

Although starch content of the kernel is closely related to bushel weight, feeding value, especially in beef cattle diets, does not appear to be affected. There are several studies that suggest light test weight corn is equal to or slightly higher in feeding value than normal test weight corn, especially in backgrounding or growing diets. With today’s tight cattle markets, there may be opportunities to purchase light test weight grains to reduce feeding costs and improve feeding margins.

Fall has presented several challenges for corn producers in the northern great plains. While corn prices dropped from their summer record highs, much of the corn remained in the field, seemingly refusing to dry down to acceptable moisture levels. For those that are fortunate enough to be completing corn harvest, light test weights have also created marketing problems for many producers. During the last three weeks, several operators have had corn severely docked, or refused, due to light test weights.

Bushel test weights are an important component for the USDA grain grading system (Table 1). Bushel weights are an indicator of the maturity and quality of the crop harvested, and meeting the established requirements is a critical component for establishing price and fair trading of grain commodities. Test weights are an indicator of the starch level within the kernel, as well as relative proportions of fiber, ash, starch, and oil as they relate to stage of maturity of the grain.

Although starch content of the kernel is closely related to bushel weight, feeding value, especially in beef cattle diets, does not appear to be affected. There are several studies that suggest light test weight corn is equal to or slightly higher in feeding value than normal test weight corn, especially in backgrounding or growing diets. With today’s tight cattle markets, there may be opportunities to purchase light test weight grains to reduce feeding costs and improve feeding margins.

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Fall has presented several challenges for corn producers in the northern great plains. While corn prices dropped from their summer record highs, much of the corn remained in the field, seemingly refusing to dry down to acceptable moisture levels. For those that are fortunate enough to be completing corn harvest, light test weights have also created marketing problems for many producers. During the last three weeks, several operators have had corn severely docked, or refused, due to light test weights.

Bushel test weights are an important component for the USDA grain grading system (Table 1). Bushel weights are an indicator of the maturity and quality of the crop harvested, and meeting the established requirements is a critical component for establishing price and fair trading of grain commodities. Test weights are an indicator of the starch level within the kernel, as well as relative proportions of fiber, ash, starch, and oil as they relate to stage of maturity of the grain.

Although starch content of the kernel is closely related to bushel weight, feeding value, especially in beef cattle diets, does not appear to be affected. There are several studies that suggest light test weight corn is equal to or slightly higher in feeding value than normal test weight corn, especially in backgrounding or growing diets. With today’s tight cattle markets, there may be opportunities to purchase light test weight grains to reduce feeding costs and improve feeding margins.

Fall has presented several challenges for corn producers in the northern great plains. While corn prices dropped from their summer record highs, much of the corn remained in the field, seemingly refusing to dry down to acceptable moisture levels. For those that are fortunate enough to be completing corn harvest, light test weights have also created marketing problems for many producers. During the last three weeks, several operators have had corn severely docked, or refused, due to light test weights.

Bushel test weights are an important component for the USDA grain grading system (Table 1). Bushel weights are an indicator of the maturity and quality of the crop harvested, and meeting the established requirements is a critical component for establishing price and fair trading of grain commodities. Test weights are an indicator of the starch level within the kernel, as well as relative proportions of fiber, ash, starch, and oil as they relate to stage of maturity of the grain.

Although starch content of the kernel is closely related to bushel weight, feeding value, especially in beef cattle diets, does not appear to be affected. There are several studies that suggest light test weight corn is equal to or slightly higher in feeding value than normal test weight corn, especially in backgrounding or growing diets. With today’s tight cattle markets, there may be opportunities to purchase light test weight grains to reduce feeding costs and improve feeding margins.