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Frank Galey: UW gains state funding for brucellosis research

Developing a vaccine for brucellosis is one of the most important tasks underway for University of Wyoming (UW) agriculture researchers, Frank Galey, Dean of the UW College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, told a group of Wyoming cattle producers during the 2011 Cattlemen’s Conference.

“The Wyoming Legislature gave us some funding to conduct research on brucellosis,” Galey said. “The University is working with what resources we have to try and develop a vaccine for the disease. We have been hiring people who are especially interested in brucellosis. One of our new faculty members is an immunologist with a special interest in vaccine development for exotic diseases.”

Galey said researchers are hopeful they can locate molecular targets to test that might make it possible to eventually develop a vaccine for brucellosis. Currently, tests are available to indicate if an animal has been exposed, but the test can’t determine if the animal has an active infection. “We have a live animal test at least in development to see if an animal is actually packing infection,” he said.



“We’re also working on a project to determine how these targets might fit into a new vaccine, and the impact of adult vaccination of cattle,” he added. “We have an ongoing project with a number of producers looking at adult vaccines to see how often we will need to re-vaccinate to keep immunity from the disease,” he continued. “One concern is the remote possibility that a heifer that is born to a cow with brucellosis may survive and test negative, then give birth to a calf with brucellosis and become a carrier for the disease.”

In addition to ongoing research at the University, Galey said they continue to seek federal funding for brucellosis research. “Scientists from several states are working together to try and develop a vaccine,” he explained. “We continue looking for targets to find out what they could turn on to allow the animals to be better able to fight the disease. We would like to see the legislature support funding for brucellosis research,” he said. “We don’t want to see USDA walk away from the problem leaving the states to deal with it.”



Developing a vaccine for brucellosis is one of the most important tasks underway for University of Wyoming (UW) agriculture researchers, Frank Galey, Dean of the UW College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, told a group of Wyoming cattle producers during the 2011 Cattlemen’s Conference.

“The Wyoming Legislature gave us some funding to conduct research on brucellosis,” Galey said. “The University is working with what resources we have to try and develop a vaccine for the disease. We have been hiring people who are especially interested in brucellosis. One of our new faculty members is an immunologist with a special interest in vaccine development for exotic diseases.”

Galey said researchers are hopeful they can locate molecular targets to test that might make it possible to eventually develop a vaccine for brucellosis. Currently, tests are available to indicate if an animal has been exposed, but the test can’t determine if the animal has an active infection. “We have a live animal test at least in development to see if an animal is actually packing infection,” he said.

“We’re also working on a project to determine how these targets might fit into a new vaccine, and the impact of adult vaccination of cattle,” he added. “We have an ongoing project with a number of producers looking at adult vaccines to see how often we will need to re-vaccinate to keep immunity from the disease,” he continued. “One concern is the remote possibility that a heifer that is born to a cow with brucellosis may survive and test negative, then give birth to a calf with brucellosis and become a carrier for the disease.”

In addition to ongoing research at the University, Galey said they continue to seek federal funding for brucellosis research. “Scientists from several states are working together to try and develop a vaccine,” he explained. “We continue looking for targets to find out what they could turn on to allow the animals to be better able to fight the disease. We would like to see the legislature support funding for brucellosis research,” he said. “We don’t want to see USDA walk away from the problem leaving the states to deal with it.”

Developing a vaccine for brucellosis is one of the most important tasks underway for University of Wyoming (UW) agriculture researchers, Frank Galey, Dean of the UW College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, told a group of Wyoming cattle producers during the 2011 Cattlemen’s Conference.

“The Wyoming Legislature gave us some funding to conduct research on brucellosis,” Galey said. “The University is working with what resources we have to try and develop a vaccine for the disease. We have been hiring people who are especially interested in brucellosis. One of our new faculty members is an immunologist with a special interest in vaccine development for exotic diseases.”

Galey said researchers are hopeful they can locate molecular targets to test that might make it possible to eventually develop a vaccine for brucellosis. Currently, tests are available to indicate if an animal has been exposed, but the test can’t determine if the animal has an active infection. “We have a live animal test at least in development to see if an animal is actually packing infection,” he said.

“We’re also working on a project to determine how these targets might fit into a new vaccine, and the impact of adult vaccination of cattle,” he added. “We have an ongoing project with a number of producers looking at adult vaccines to see how often we will need to re-vaccinate to keep immunity from the disease,” he continued. “One concern is the remote possibility that a heifer that is born to a cow with brucellosis may survive and test negative, then give birth to a calf with brucellosis and become a carrier for the disease.”

In addition to ongoing research at the University, Galey said they continue to seek federal funding for brucellosis research. “Scientists from several states are working together to try and develop a vaccine,” he explained. “We continue looking for targets to find out what they could turn on to allow the animals to be better able to fight the disease. We would like to see the legislature support funding for brucellosis research,” he said. “We don’t want to see USDA walk away from the problem leaving the states to deal with it.”


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