Happy shopping | TSLN.com

Happy shopping

For the Dec. 12, 2009 edition of Tri-State Livestock News.

Guess I shouldn’t have made that comment about it not being down to zero yet, huh? Oh well… it’s almost the middle of December. After all, there’s less than two weeks ’till the shortest day, so it’s really been a nice winter so far! Many’s the time I’ve seen drifts five or six feet deep and a week running of below zero temp’s day and night at this time of year…

How’s your Christmas shoppin’ getting along? I haven’t even started – but if you are in the shopping mood I must keep my promise to offer hot tips.

If any history buffs show up on your list you’ll want to know about a new book on THE SUNDANCE KID – subtitled The Life of Harry Alonzo Longabaugh, by Donna B. Ernst. Turns out, Donna is married to a Longabaugh descendent; and she’s included a lot of new information in three detailed appendices. My curiosity is excited by learning she includes the text of “many original letters and notes written by or about Sundance.”

The review I read calls it “a story written with affection” and notes that the Longabaughs didn’t acknowledge Sundance “for six decades.” The short read, just 174 pages, is available through the Sundance Times here in Wyoming, or from Omni Distributing, Box 310, Sundance 82729. Sounds like a ‘must have’ for all who love outlaw and lawman history!

I ran across news of some research on deafness in Paint horses recently, and thought those of you interested in Paints might want to know more. The School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California-Davis was site of the research; where co-author of the study, K. Gary Magdesian, DVM, reported, “Deafness is infrequently recognized in horses…” However, the completed study determined that American Paint Horses with certain coat patterns and blue eyes appear to be “at particular risk for deafness.”

Magdesian said, “To investigate whether coat color patterns were associated with deafness in American Paint Horses, we compared clinical findings, hearing test results (a brain auditory-evoked response test), and genotype of the endothelin B receptor gene (linked to a specific overo coat pattern) in both confirmed and suspected deaf American Paint Horses and nondeaf American Paint Horses and Pintos.”

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Among key findings in the study indicated that the deaf horses examined “had abnormal brain auditory-revoked response tests,” that most but not all the deaf horses had “splashed white or splashed white-frame blend” coat patterns. Other coat patterns noted in deaf horses included “frame overo and tovero,” with a prominence of white markings on head and limbs; and most deaf horses had two blue eyes.

While it’s noted that these deaf horses can become perfectly useful, people performing pre-purchase exams or studying potential for passing a trait on through selective breeding should find this study helpful. It was published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Nov. 15, 2009; and the abstract is currently available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19912043.

Since we’re talking horses and horse breeding – and I’ve been recommending books for your Christmas list – I’d be remiss not to remind you of the biographies of two great horsemen that are available from Loft Enterprises, LLC.

Of course Hank Wiescamp holds the distinction of being the only person ever inducted into Hall’s of Fame of three breed organizations – Quarter Horse, Palomino and Appaloosa – and his life story is just as colorful! As the blurp for THE HANK WIESCAMP STORY says, Wiescamp “built an empire around a family of horses so singular in type and coloring that they came to be known simply as ‘Wiescamp Horses.'” Photos, pedigrees and show and race records of many of those horses are included in this great book by Frank Holmes.

A horseman all his life, Frank has the ability to sensitively portray both equine and human heroes, and his biography of Walter Merrick – WIRE TO WIRE – is “a moving tribute to a great American – a man who rose from humble beginnings to unparalleled heights of success on the strength of his vision and energy – and who became a part of the lore and legend of the American West in the process.” Icon of the Quarter Horse racing world, Merrick is one of the most influential and colorful horsemen of all time. These two bio’s… or either of them… will convince the recipient Santa thinks they’ve been very good this year; and you can find them at http://www.loftent.com or call Carol at 785-598-2507. Both are packed with photos and information to thrill any horse lover.

A few summers ago our good friend Georgie Sicking and I were invited to recite cowboy poetry for the summer celebration at the National Museum of Wildlife Art at Jackson, WY – and we found it exhilarating. If you’ve never been there, put it on your list of places to go before you die… Bronwyn Minton and staff are fantastic, and the Museum is an amazing place, appearing to sprout directly from the stony foothills of the Teton’s!

Now they’ve gone one step further and produced a 262-page softbound book illustrating the range of art collected at the Museum. There are more than 130 photos of the various types and styles of artwork, and you will also learn a lot about the individual artists. Touted as a “cross between a reference book and a coffee table book,” WILDLIFE IN AMERICAN ART by Adam Duncan Harris should delight every serious book collector, wildlife enthusiast, or art aficionado on your Christmas shopping list! It is available through the National Museum of Wildlife Art at 800-313-9553 or at the website of University of Oklahoma Press, http://www.oupress.com.

As the attention of many of us has been focused on Las Vegas this week while the 2009 NFR unfolds, it’s good to know of another presence there from Tri-State Country. We’re proud of Wyoming ranchwoman/horsewoman Sue Wallis, instrumental in the founding of the United Horsemen’s Front – an active organization striving to protect the rights of horse owners; work for reasonable solutions to ensure the humane care and management of horses from birth to death; ensure the long-term sustainability and viability of the equine industry and restore the market for all horses. The group has a booth in Vegas, selling raffle tickets on a 2009 Dodge 4WD 2000SLT Short Bed pickup which is on display there at NFR. They’ll sell only 2,000 $100 tickets on the vehicle, which will be drawn for at a press conference in Cheyenne, WY, once that number of tickets have been sold; with the winner being notified. To learn more about this group, or to stuff someone’s stocking with tickets on this beautiful truck, go to http://www.UnitedOrgsoftheHorse.org.

Looks like that’s the end of our ol’ lariat rope for this time… happy shopping!

Guess I shouldn’t have made that comment about it not being down to zero yet, huh? Oh well… it’s almost the middle of December. After all, there’s less than two weeks ’till the shortest day, so it’s really been a nice winter so far! Many’s the time I’ve seen drifts five or six feet deep and a week running of below zero temp’s day and night at this time of year…

How’s your Christmas shoppin’ getting along? I haven’t even started – but if you are in the shopping mood I must keep my promise to offer hot tips.

If any history buffs show up on your list you’ll want to know about a new book on THE SUNDANCE KID – subtitled The Life of Harry Alonzo Longabaugh, by Donna B. Ernst. Turns out, Donna is married to a Longabaugh descendent; and she’s included a lot of new information in three detailed appendices. My curiosity is excited by learning she includes the text of “many original letters and notes written by or about Sundance.”

The review I read calls it “a story written with affection” and notes that the Longabaughs didn’t acknowledge Sundance “for six decades.” The short read, just 174 pages, is available through the Sundance Times here in Wyoming, or from Omni Distributing, Box 310, Sundance 82729. Sounds like a ‘must have’ for all who love outlaw and lawman history!

I ran across news of some research on deafness in Paint horses recently, and thought those of you interested in Paints might want to know more. The School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California-Davis was site of the research; where co-author of the study, K. Gary Magdesian, DVM, reported, “Deafness is infrequently recognized in horses…” However, the completed study determined that American Paint Horses with certain coat patterns and blue eyes appear to be “at particular risk for deafness.”

Magdesian said, “To investigate whether coat color patterns were associated with deafness in American Paint Horses, we compared clinical findings, hearing test results (a brain auditory-evoked response test), and genotype of the endothelin B receptor gene (linked to a specific overo coat pattern) in both confirmed and suspected deaf American Paint Horses and nondeaf American Paint Horses and Pintos.”

Among key findings in the study indicated that the deaf horses examined “had abnormal brain auditory-revoked response tests,” that most but not all the deaf horses had “splashed white or splashed white-frame blend” coat patterns. Other coat patterns noted in deaf horses included “frame overo and tovero,” with a prominence of white markings on head and limbs; and most deaf horses had two blue eyes.

While it’s noted that these deaf horses can become perfectly useful, people performing pre-purchase exams or studying potential for passing a trait on through selective breeding should find this study helpful. It was published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Nov. 15, 2009; and the abstract is currently available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19912043.

Since we’re talking horses and horse breeding – and I’ve been recommending books for your Christmas list – I’d be remiss not to remind you of the biographies of two great horsemen that are available from Loft Enterprises, LLC.

Of course Hank Wiescamp holds the distinction of being the only person ever inducted into Hall’s of Fame of three breed organizations – Quarter Horse, Palomino and Appaloosa – and his life story is just as colorful! As the blurp for THE HANK WIESCAMP STORY says, Wiescamp “built an empire around a family of horses so singular in type and coloring that they came to be known simply as ‘Wiescamp Horses.'” Photos, pedigrees and show and race records of many of those horses are included in this great book by Frank Holmes.

A horseman all his life, Frank has the ability to sensitively portray both equine and human heroes, and his biography of Walter Merrick – WIRE TO WIRE – is “a moving tribute to a great American – a man who rose from humble beginnings to unparalleled heights of success on the strength of his vision and energy – and who became a part of the lore and legend of the American West in the process.” Icon of the Quarter Horse racing world, Merrick is one of the most influential and colorful horsemen of all time. These two bio’s… or either of them… will convince the recipient Santa thinks they’ve been very good this year; and you can find them at http://www.loftent.com or call Carol at 785-598-2507. Both are packed with photos and information to thrill any horse lover.

A few summers ago our good friend Georgie Sicking and I were invited to recite cowboy poetry for the summer celebration at the National Museum of Wildlife Art at Jackson, WY – and we found it exhilarating. If you’ve never been there, put it on your list of places to go before you die… Bronwyn Minton and staff are fantastic, and the Museum is an amazing place, appearing to sprout directly from the stony foothills of the Teton’s!

Now they’ve gone one step further and produced a 262-page softbound book illustrating the range of art collected at the Museum. There are more than 130 photos of the various types and styles of artwork, and you will also learn a lot about the individual artists. Touted as a “cross between a reference book and a coffee table book,” WILDLIFE IN AMERICAN ART by Adam Duncan Harris should delight every serious book collector, wildlife enthusiast, or art aficionado on your Christmas shopping list! It is available through the National Museum of Wildlife Art at 800-313-9553 or at the website of University of Oklahoma Press, http://www.oupress.com.

As the attention of many of us has been focused on Las Vegas this week while the 2009 NFR unfolds, it’s good to know of another presence there from Tri-State Country. We’re proud of Wyoming ranchwoman/horsewoman Sue Wallis, instrumental in the founding of the United Horsemen’s Front – an active organization striving to protect the rights of horse owners; work for reasonable solutions to ensure the humane care and management of horses from birth to death; ensure the long-term sustainability and viability of the equine industry and restore the market for all horses. The group has a booth in Vegas, selling raffle tickets on a 2009 Dodge 4WD 2000SLT Short Bed pickup which is on display there at NFR. They’ll sell only 2,000 $100 tickets on the vehicle, which will be drawn for at a press conference in Cheyenne, WY, once that number of tickets have been sold; with the winner being notified. To learn more about this group, or to stuff someone’s stocking with tickets on this beautiful truck, go to http://www.UnitedOrgsoftheHorse.org.

Looks like that’s the end of our ol’ lariat rope for this time… happy shopping!