History made in NWSS Catch-A-Calf program | TSLN.com
YOUR AD HERE »

History made in NWSS Catch-A-Calf program

Courtesy photoAksel Wiseman of Hershey, NE showing Earl during the 2010 NWSS Catch-A-Calf competition.

Two Nebraska youth made history this year during the Catch-A-Calf show at the National Western Stock Show.

Not only did Aksel Wiseman of Hershey and Emilee Elwood of Gordon capture champion and reserve honors, respectively, in the Catch-A-Calf Show, they were the first exhibitors in history to sell Catch-A-Calves in the Junior Livestock Sale of Champions.

Although the Catch-A-Calf competition has been a part of the NWSS since 1935, this is the first year the champion and reserve champion Catch-A-Calves have been permitted to sell in the Junior Livestock Sale of Champions. Only the top 90 animals at the NWSS junior shows are permitted to sell in the auction.



Wiseman, 15, and Elwood, 14, both said they are very proud to be the first youths permitted to sell catch-a-calves in the prestigious sale.

“When we were named champions, we were very surprised and excited, because we knew we were going to make history,” Elwood said.



Wiseman added, “I had no idea I was going to win the whole thing when I went down there. It was such a big surprise to me when I won the whole show. The sale was probably one of the greatest experiences of my life.” He continued, “we were invited to the buyer’s social before the sale, and were able to meet a lot of the buyers. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

The Catch-A-Calf program is more than just a live animal evaluation. Exhibitors are also evaluated on their record book, sponsor relations, an interview, production, and showmanship. Before determining a winner, judges looked at each exhibitor’s letter writing skills, knowledge of the beef industry and their animal, a two minute presentation, showmanship and fitting skills, record book, and a live animal evaluation.

Each youth in the program had a sponsor and they were expected to write monthly updates explaining how they were progressing with their project. Wiseman’s sponsor was Kent and Cindy Vance of the Colorado Elks Association, and Elwood’s sponsor was John Corkle of Wells Fargo Bank.

In the interview portion of the contest, Elwood was first, while Wiseman was fourth. In their showmanship classes, Wiseman was first, and Elwood took second. In live evaluation, Wiseman was first in his class and Elwood placed fourth in her class.

In the record book judging, Elwood was third and Wiseman was ninth. When the points were accumulated, Wiseman came out on top, followed by Elwood.

Both youth brought home many prizes from the contest. Wiseman said he earned five different plaques from different parts of the contest. Elwood said she received a belt buckle for the production phase, a picture frame for the interview, and two plaques – one for third in the record book and one for receiving reserve champion.

This year, 26 exhibitors from Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska showed in the contest. Elwood said that youth who are interested in the Catch-A-Calf program have to be active in the 4-H program, but don’t have to be enrolled in the beef project.

“You have to be at least 12-years-old, and be able to show you have adequate facilities for the calf,” she said. An extension agent also has to sign the Catch-A-Calf application for an individual to enter the program.

Wiseman said when he decided to enter the contest in 2009, about 60 youth had applied for Catch-A-Calves.

“During the rodeo performances, they would turn out a certain number of roping calves and the kids would have to catch them, and take them through a gate,” Wiseman said. “About 40 kids ended up catching calves.”

“We have to bring a rope halter to the rodeo arena,” Elwood added. “In my group, they turned out 10 calves, and there were 13 kids. The rodeo clowns in the arena can help you by roping the calf, then you have to get a halter on it and drag it through the gate.”

Those who successfully caught a calf during the rodeo received their prospect calves from the Y-Cross Ranch in May 2009.

“When we first got them, they came from a feedlot, so they didn’t look like a typical show calf,” Elwood said. “But, I took mine home and fed it really well. It looked really good when I brought it back.”

Elwood’s steer was a black crossbred she named “Denver.”

“I thought the name was pretty much a classic,” she said, laughing.

Wiseman’s steer was a black baldy crossbred named “Earl.”

Both youth said they learned a lot from the project.

“I found out that being in this project isn’t an overnight success,” Elwood says. “You really have to work at it to be successful. When we picked up the steers, they had halters on them and were tied to the fence. But they had just been tied up for the first time the day before.

“My steer just didn’t want to cooperate. We got him home, and the first thing he did was jump the cattle panels,” adds Elwood. “He was really small – I think he gained over 800 pounds while I had him. The last two months, he hasn’t gained well because it was so cold, and he used it all for energy. Finally, by Christmas break, he started coming around. He still wasn’t very good with a show stick, but he would do most anything I wanted him to do. He was a lot different by the time I showed him compared to how he was when I first got him.”

Wiseman, who is the son of Robert and Sara Wiseman, said he had wanted to try a Catch-A-Calf program, and was deciding between Ak-Sar-Ben and Denver.

“I decided on the NWSS, because it was the only time I could show there,” he said. “I was really glad I was in the program, because it taught me a lot about responsibility. You learn a lot about keeping a record book, and you have the opportunity to develop relationships with all the people you meet through this program. It was very important to me. The whole program was a great experience, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who wants to learn more about showing cattle, and how to take on more responsibility.”

Elwood said she would also recommend the project to anyone.

“I would definitely recommend it to any kid interested in livestock,” she said. “It is a lot of work, but if you try, it can really pay off.”

Elwood said she got in the event after a friend had been in it the year before.

“When he brought his calf to our fair, his parents told mine it was a good program to get into, so we decided to give it a try,” she said.

Elwood, who is the daughter of Pete and Joni Elwood, has been showing cattle for four years.

“This program was a lot different than 4-H,” she says. “I learned a lot about keeping records, and I learned a lot about cattle. I learned more about how to feed them correctly, and how to get them to the weight they need to be for market.”

As an active member of 4-H and FFA, Elwood competes in several progress shows and went to the Western Junior Livestock Show in Rapid City, SD last fall. Elwood dreams of a career in agriculture.

“I am thinking about being a veterinarian someday,” she said. “But, I would really like to major in something in agriculture.”

Wiseman is starting his sixth year showing cattle. In addition to being an active 4-H member, he also exhibits at Nebraska State Fair and Ak-Sar-Ben, in addition to numerous progress shows. Although his own local fair didn’t have a class for “Earl” last fall, he traveled to Brighton to show him in a progress show at the Adams County Fair.

Two Nebraska youth made history this year during the Catch-A-Calf show at the National Western Stock Show.

Not only did Aksel Wiseman of Hershey and Emilee Elwood of Gordon capture champion and reserve honors, respectively, in the Catch-A-Calf Show, they were the first exhibitors in history to sell Catch-A-Calves in the Junior Livestock Sale of Champions.

Although the Catch-A-Calf competition has been a part of the NWSS since 1935, this is the first year the champion and reserve champion Catch-A-Calves have been permitted to sell in the Junior Livestock Sale of Champions. Only the top 90 animals at the NWSS junior shows are permitted to sell in the auction.

Wiseman, 15, and Elwood, 14, both said they are very proud to be the first youths permitted to sell catch-a-calves in the prestigious sale.

“When we were named champions, we were very surprised and excited, because we knew we were going to make history,” Elwood said.

Wiseman added, “I had no idea I was going to win the whole thing when I went down there. It was such a big surprise to me when I won the whole show. The sale was probably one of the greatest experiences of my life.” He continued, “we were invited to the buyer’s social before the sale, and were able to meet a lot of the buyers. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

The Catch-A-Calf program is more than just a live animal evaluation. Exhibitors are also evaluated on their record book, sponsor relations, an interview, production, and showmanship. Before determining a winner, judges looked at each exhibitor’s letter writing skills, knowledge of the beef industry and their animal, a two minute presentation, showmanship and fitting skills, record book, and a live animal evaluation.

Each youth in the program had a sponsor and they were expected to write monthly updates explaining how they were progressing with their project. Wiseman’s sponsor was Kent and Cindy Vance of the Colorado Elks Association, and Elwood’s sponsor was John Corkle of Wells Fargo Bank.

In the interview portion of the contest, Elwood was first, while Wiseman was fourth. In their showmanship classes, Wiseman was first, and Elwood took second. In live evaluation, Wiseman was first in his class and Elwood placed fourth in her class.

In the record book judging, Elwood was third and Wiseman was ninth. When the points were accumulated, Wiseman came out on top, followed by Elwood.

Both youth brought home many prizes from the contest. Wiseman said he earned five different plaques from different parts of the contest. Elwood said she received a belt buckle for the production phase, a picture frame for the interview, and two plaques – one for third in the record book and one for receiving reserve champion.

This year, 26 exhibitors from Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska showed in the contest. Elwood said that youth who are interested in the Catch-A-Calf program have to be active in the 4-H program, but don’t have to be enrolled in the beef project.

“You have to be at least 12-years-old, and be able to show you have adequate facilities for the calf,” she said. An extension agent also has to sign the Catch-A-Calf application for an individual to enter the program.

Wiseman said when he decided to enter the contest in 2009, about 60 youth had applied for Catch-A-Calves.

“During the rodeo performances, they would turn out a certain number of roping calves and the kids would have to catch them, and take them through a gate,” Wiseman said. “About 40 kids ended up catching calves.”

“We have to bring a rope halter to the rodeo arena,” Elwood added. “In my group, they turned out 10 calves, and there were 13 kids. The rodeo clowns in the arena can help you by roping the calf, then you have to get a halter on it and drag it through the gate.”

Those who successfully caught a calf during the rodeo received their prospect calves from the Y-Cross Ranch in May 2009.

“When we first got them, they came from a feedlot, so they didn’t look like a typical show calf,” Elwood said. “But, I took mine home and fed it really well. It looked really good when I brought it back.”

Elwood’s steer was a black crossbred she named “Denver.”

“I thought the name was pretty much a classic,” she said, laughing.

Wiseman’s steer was a black baldy crossbred named “Earl.”

Both youth said they learned a lot from the project.

“I found out that being in this project isn’t an overnight success,” Elwood says. “You really have to work at it to be successful. When we picked up the steers, they had halters on them and were tied to the fence. But they had just been tied up for the first time the day before.

“My steer just didn’t want to cooperate. We got him home, and the first thing he did was jump the cattle panels,” adds Elwood. “He was really small – I think he gained over 800 pounds while I had him. The last two months, he hasn’t gained well because it was so cold, and he used it all for energy. Finally, by Christmas break, he started coming around. He still wasn’t very good with a show stick, but he would do most anything I wanted him to do. He was a lot different by the time I showed him compared to how he was when I first got him.”

Wiseman, who is the son of Robert and Sara Wiseman, said he had wanted to try a Catch-A-Calf program, and was deciding between Ak-Sar-Ben and Denver.

“I decided on the NWSS, because it was the only time I could show there,” he said. “I was really glad I was in the program, because it taught me a lot about responsibility. You learn a lot about keeping a record book, and you have the opportunity to develop relationships with all the people you meet through this program. It was very important to me. The whole program was a great experience, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who wants to learn more about showing cattle, and how to take on more responsibility.”

Elwood said she would also recommend the project to anyone.

“I would definitely recommend it to any kid interested in livestock,” she said. “It is a lot of work, but if you try, it can really pay off.”

Elwood said she got in the event after a friend had been in it the year before.

“When he brought his calf to our fair, his parents told mine it was a good program to get into, so we decided to give it a try,” she said.

Elwood, who is the daughter of Pete and Joni Elwood, has been showing cattle for four years.

“This program was a lot different than 4-H,” she says. “I learned a lot about keeping records, and I learned a lot about cattle. I learned more about how to feed them correctly, and how to get them to the weight they need to be for market.”

As an active member of 4-H and FFA, Elwood competes in several progress shows and went to the Western Junior Livestock Show in Rapid City, SD last fall. Elwood dreams of a career in agriculture.

“I am thinking about being a veterinarian someday,” she said. “But, I would really like to major in something in agriculture.”

Wiseman is starting his sixth year showing cattle. In addition to being an active 4-H member, he also exhibits at Nebraska State Fair and Ak-Sar-Ben, in addition to numerous progress shows. Although his own local fair didn’t have a class for “Earl” last fall, he traveled to Brighton to show him in a progress show at the Adams County Fair.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


News


See more