Holstein heaven | TSLN.com

Holstein heaven

Loretta Sorensen

Photo by Loretta SorensenTroy Randall of Dell Rapids, SD has his own feeding operation featuring Holstein steers.

Like many young farmers, Troy Randall was hopeful he could join his father, Ron, in their farming operation outside Dell Rapids, SD, once he finished his college degree. Just as many other young farmers, he found himself face-to-face with some tremendous financial challenges as he began developing his farming plans.

“I wasn’t in a position to buy more land and I wanted to feed cattle,” Randall said. “I was tired of hauling our corn to Jasper and watch train car after train car haul it somewhere else to feed it. I thought there had to be a way for us to use that corn and add value to our farming operation. That was 13 years ago. Corn was cheap and feeder cattle were sky high. The only way I could get started with my own feeding operation was to start feeding Holstein steers.”

At the time that he bought his first steers, Randall found he didn’t have to make a major investment to start building a herd.

“Hardly anybody wanted them then, so you could buy them pretty cheap,” he said. “I started working with about 30 different dairies and brought their bull calves in. The first ones I brought in weren’t even off milk yet. It was pretty labor intensive to be feeding milk after they got here.”

Like many young farmers, Troy Randall was hopeful he could join his father, Ron, in their farming operation outside Dell Rapids, SD, once he finished his college degree. Just as many other young farmers, he found himself face-to-face with some tremendous financial challenges as he began developing his farming plans.

“I wasn’t in a position to buy more land and I wanted to feed cattle,” Randall said. “I was tired of hauling our corn to Jasper and watch train car after train car haul it somewhere else to feed it. I thought there had to be a way for us to use that corn and add value to our farming operation. That was 13 years ago. Corn was cheap and feeder cattle were sky high. The only way I could get started with my own feeding operation was to start feeding Holstein steers.”

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At the time that he bought his first steers, Randall found he didn’t have to make a major investment to start building a herd.

“Hardly anybody wanted them then, so you could buy them pretty cheap,” he said. “I started working with about 30 different dairies and brought their bull calves in. The first ones I brought in weren’t even off milk yet. It was pretty labor intensive to be feeding milk after they got here.”

Like many young farmers, Troy Randall was hopeful he could join his father, Ron, in their farming operation outside Dell Rapids, SD, once he finished his college degree. Just as many other young farmers, he found himself face-to-face with some tremendous financial challenges as he began developing his farming plans.

“I wasn’t in a position to buy more land and I wanted to feed cattle,” Randall said. “I was tired of hauling our corn to Jasper and watch train car after train car haul it somewhere else to feed it. I thought there had to be a way for us to use that corn and add value to our farming operation. That was 13 years ago. Corn was cheap and feeder cattle were sky high. The only way I could get started with my own feeding operation was to start feeding Holstein steers.”

At the time that he bought his first steers, Randall found he didn’t have to make a major investment to start building a herd.

“Hardly anybody wanted them then, so you could buy them pretty cheap,” he said. “I started working with about 30 different dairies and brought their bull calves in. The first ones I brought in weren’t even off milk yet. It was pretty labor intensive to be feeding milk after they got here.”

Like many young farmers, Troy Randall was hopeful he could join his father, Ron, in their farming operation outside Dell Rapids, SD, once he finished his college degree. Just as many other young farmers, he found himself face-to-face with some tremendous financial challenges as he began developing his farming plans.

“I wasn’t in a position to buy more land and I wanted to feed cattle,” Randall said. “I was tired of hauling our corn to Jasper and watch train car after train car haul it somewhere else to feed it. I thought there had to be a way for us to use that corn and add value to our farming operation. That was 13 years ago. Corn was cheap and feeder cattle were sky high. The only way I could get started with my own feeding operation was to start feeding Holstein steers.”

At the time that he bought his first steers, Randall found he didn’t have to make a major investment to start building a herd.

“Hardly anybody wanted them then, so you could buy them pretty cheap,” he said. “I started working with about 30 different dairies and brought their bull calves in. The first ones I brought in weren’t even off milk yet. It was pretty labor intensive to be feeding milk after they got here.”

Like many young farmers, Troy Randall was hopeful he could join his father, Ron, in their farming operation outside Dell Rapids, SD, once he finished his college degree. Just as many other young farmers, he found himself face-to-face with some tremendous financial challenges as he began developing his farming plans.

“I wasn’t in a position to buy more land and I wanted to feed cattle,” Randall said. “I was tired of hauling our corn to Jasper and watch train car after train car haul it somewhere else to feed it. I thought there had to be a way for us to use that corn and add value to our farming operation. That was 13 years ago. Corn was cheap and feeder cattle were sky high. The only way I could get started with my own feeding operation was to start feeding Holstein steers.”

At the time that he bought his first steers, Randall found he didn’t have to make a major investment to start building a herd.

“Hardly anybody wanted them then, so you could buy them pretty cheap,” he said. “I started working with about 30 different dairies and brought their bull calves in. The first ones I brought in weren’t even off milk yet. It was pretty labor intensive to be feeding milk after they got here.”