Horse racing news | TSLN.com

Horse racing news

For the Oct. 24, 2009 edition of Tri-State Livestock News.

We aim to use this column as a forum to cover a broad spectrum of issues and news involving equines – and of course there is so much to report that we can barely scratch the surface. Often I feel the discipline of racing is neglected. In an effort to correct that, we recently discussed some horse racing results from North Dakota.

This time, here’s the scoop from South Dakota racing for 2009. Chicks Brief Case owned by June LaCroix was top 1-year-old filly, followed by Bella Special owned by Lyman Chase in 2nd. For 2-year-old geldings the champ was Two Coronas and Okey Dokey Dakota was 2nd, both owned by Tom Maher. Hank Bowker’s Tentation was top 2-year-old stallion while Thomas Anderberg’s Larks Merridoc was 2nd. Dashing Meteor owned by Johnny Johnson was to 3-year-old filly; Alan Ham’s Proud Royal Shakem was top 3-year-old gelding; and Tom Maher’s Confection Cartel was top 3-year-old stallion.

Tom Maher of Pierre was Leading Breeder, followed by Alan Ham of Piedmont and June La Croix of Rapid City. June’s Chicks Brief Case was Leading Money Earner, followed by Ham’s Proud Royal Shakem, who was also High Point overall champion. Jake Olesiak was leading jockey, with Zack Bacon and Jim Beeson in 2nd and 3rd respectively. Bob Johnson was Leading Trainer, with Ernest Fennell in 2nd and Jim Fleming in 3rd. We tip our ‘ol Tri-State Stetson to all these breeders, trainers, jockeys and fine horses who worked so hard to earn these honors.

Speaking of racing in North Dakota, they’ve passed some interesting legislation on account wagering tax laws; significantly reducing the State tax levied on account wagering and removing the 4% tax assessment on the first $11 million wagered. According to The Racing Journal, three new account wagering companies and one tote company were licensed in the state last June and July. They say that brings “an exciting new era to live horse racing in North Dakota as the state will likely exhibit an increase in the three special funds.”

“Increases in the promotion, purse, and breed funds will directly affect those who are engaged in live racing,” The Racing Journal concludes. Interestingly, North Dakota specifies that account wagering companies must be partnered with non-profit organizations, so those charities will share in the direct positive impact of every upsurge in wagering. Those interested in the new tax legislation or wishing to establish an account wagering business are encouraged to contact the North Dakota Racing Commission.

Before we leave the subject of horse racing, don’t forget some of the biggest and best action is on the near horizon as that most prestigious racing event, the Breeders’ Cup World Thoroughbred Championships, happens at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, CA, Nov. 6th and 7th. The 14 Breeders’ Cup races will pay out an accumulated $25.5 million in prizes, including the Breeders’ Cup Classic with a purse of $5 million.

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Three new races this year include the $1 million Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint, pitting 3-year-old’s and up in a 6 1/2 furlong chase across the turf. Then the $1 million Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf races 2-year-old fillies a mile on the turf; and 3-year-old’s and up take to the dirt for a mile and a half in the $500,000 Breeders’ Cup Dirt Marathon.

Whether you’re racing, showing or breeding, there are times you especially want your best mare to foal either a colt or a filly from that special mating. Some of the old horsemen had ideas about controlling that by breeding the mare early or late in her cycle; a more scientific study has recently come to light.

According to an article by Liz brown in a recent issue of theHORSE.com, two highly accredited researches in New Zealand recently discovered “a striking correlation between the change in a mare’s condition and the sex of her foal.” The study was done with wild horses, and showed that, “In mares that were gaining weight at the time of conception, 80% had a colt, while only 3% who were losing weight gave birth to a colt.”

The researchers – Elissa Cameron, MSc, PhD, and Wayne Linklater, PhD – believe the change in the mare’s condition might determine the sex of the foal; hypothesizing that strong mares will produce strong foals and a strong colt would be able to spread the mare’s bloodlines more than a strong filly. They said, “at present, the mechanism that might be causing this relationship isn’t understood.”

“It appears that glucose may play a role as we manipulated glucose levels in mice and got a shift in sex ratio,” Cameron said. “However the relationship is complicated, especially if it is driven by glucose levels since glucose is pretty well regulated by insulin.”

Interesting information… it might just turn into something useful as they pursue the study.

We need to tip the ol’ Tri-State Stetson once more before we get out of here. I want to salute Miles City, MT cowboy Cliff Wolfe on his recent 90th birthday milestone. I haven’t had the pleasure of meetin’ this retired brand inspector and stock detective face-to-face, but we’ve enjoyed several visits on the phone and I’ve found him a rich repository of history from the region. He told me a lot about the CBC Horse outfit and has a good general grasp of area history, which is really rich in cowboy lore. We wish you many more happy birthdays Cliff; keep ridin’ ’em straight up!!

Some great rodeo action took place at the Qwest Center in Omaha, NE recently as the Wrangler Million Dollar Tour concluded the end of September. If your telly brings in the ESPN Classic channel, you can have opportunity to view that top notch action on either Nov. 1st or Nov. 29th; each broadcast is set to run at noon Eastern time.

Speakin’ of rodeo, you all know I’m a dyed-in-the-wool bronc riding fan and I’ve mentioned here how much potential I believed young Taos Muncy to have when he won the World in 2007. I was heartsick when he messed up a leg in ’08 during a Wild Ride at Salinas; and he suffered another broken ankle this spring. It looks like he’s back in full force now, though, having just won the Turquoise Circuit Finals bronc riding title and looking forward to a berth in the Wrangler NFR this year as well as a spot in next year’s Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo in Pocatello. I’ll sure be rootin’ for him… of course along with all our Tri-State hands who always make a mark in the bronc riding event.

Looks like the end of this ol’ lariat rope is comin’ up again…

We aim to use this column as a forum to cover a broad spectrum of issues and news involving equines – and of course there is so much to report that we can barely scratch the surface. Often I feel the discipline of racing is neglected. In an effort to correct that, we recently discussed some horse racing results from North Dakota.

This time, here’s the scoop from South Dakota racing for 2009. Chicks Brief Case owned by June LaCroix was top 1-year-old filly, followed by Bella Special owned by Lyman Chase in 2nd. For 2-year-old geldings the champ was Two Coronas and Okey Dokey Dakota was 2nd, both owned by Tom Maher. Hank Bowker’s Tentation was top 2-year-old stallion while Thomas Anderberg’s Larks Merridoc was 2nd. Dashing Meteor owned by Johnny Johnson was to 3-year-old filly; Alan Ham’s Proud Royal Shakem was top 3-year-old gelding; and Tom Maher’s Confection Cartel was top 3-year-old stallion.

Tom Maher of Pierre was Leading Breeder, followed by Alan Ham of Piedmont and June La Croix of Rapid City. June’s Chicks Brief Case was Leading Money Earner, followed by Ham’s Proud Royal Shakem, who was also High Point overall champion. Jake Olesiak was leading jockey, with Zack Bacon and Jim Beeson in 2nd and 3rd respectively. Bob Johnson was Leading Trainer, with Ernest Fennell in 2nd and Jim Fleming in 3rd. We tip our ‘ol Tri-State Stetson to all these breeders, trainers, jockeys and fine horses who worked so hard to earn these honors.

Speaking of racing in North Dakota, they’ve passed some interesting legislation on account wagering tax laws; significantly reducing the State tax levied on account wagering and removing the 4% tax assessment on the first $11 million wagered. According to The Racing Journal, three new account wagering companies and one tote company were licensed in the state last June and July. They say that brings “an exciting new era to live horse racing in North Dakota as the state will likely exhibit an increase in the three special funds.”

“Increases in the promotion, purse, and breed funds will directly affect those who are engaged in live racing,” The Racing Journal concludes. Interestingly, North Dakota specifies that account wagering companies must be partnered with non-profit organizations, so those charities will share in the direct positive impact of every upsurge in wagering. Those interested in the new tax legislation or wishing to establish an account wagering business are encouraged to contact the North Dakota Racing Commission.

Before we leave the subject of horse racing, don’t forget some of the biggest and best action is on the near horizon as that most prestigious racing event, the Breeders’ Cup World Thoroughbred Championships, happens at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, CA, Nov. 6th and 7th. The 14 Breeders’ Cup races will pay out an accumulated $25.5 million in prizes, including the Breeders’ Cup Classic with a purse of $5 million.

Three new races this year include the $1 million Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint, pitting 3-year-old’s and up in a 6 1/2 furlong chase across the turf. Then the $1 million Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf races 2-year-old fillies a mile on the turf; and 3-year-old’s and up take to the dirt for a mile and a half in the $500,000 Breeders’ Cup Dirt Marathon.

Whether you’re racing, showing or breeding, there are times you especially want your best mare to foal either a colt or a filly from that special mating. Some of the old horsemen had ideas about controlling that by breeding the mare early or late in her cycle; a more scientific study has recently come to light.

According to an article by Liz brown in a recent issue of theHORSE.com, two highly accredited researches in New Zealand recently discovered “a striking correlation between the change in a mare’s condition and the sex of her foal.” The study was done with wild horses, and showed that, “In mares that were gaining weight at the time of conception, 80% had a colt, while only 3% who were losing weight gave birth to a colt.”

The researchers – Elissa Cameron, MSc, PhD, and Wayne Linklater, PhD – believe the change in the mare’s condition might determine the sex of the foal; hypothesizing that strong mares will produce strong foals and a strong colt would be able to spread the mare’s bloodlines more than a strong filly. They said, “at present, the mechanism that might be causing this relationship isn’t understood.”

“It appears that glucose may play a role as we manipulated glucose levels in mice and got a shift in sex ratio,” Cameron said. “However the relationship is complicated, especially if it is driven by glucose levels since glucose is pretty well regulated by insulin.”

Interesting information… it might just turn into something useful as they pursue the study.

We need to tip the ol’ Tri-State Stetson once more before we get out of here. I want to salute Miles City, MT cowboy Cliff Wolfe on his recent 90th birthday milestone. I haven’t had the pleasure of meetin’ this retired brand inspector and stock detective face-to-face, but we’ve enjoyed several visits on the phone and I’ve found him a rich repository of history from the region. He told me a lot about the CBC Horse outfit and has a good general grasp of area history, which is really rich in cowboy lore. We wish you many more happy birthdays Cliff; keep ridin’ ’em straight up!!

Some great rodeo action took place at the Qwest Center in Omaha, NE recently as the Wrangler Million Dollar Tour concluded the end of September. If your telly brings in the ESPN Classic channel, you can have opportunity to view that top notch action on either Nov. 1st or Nov. 29th; each broadcast is set to run at noon Eastern time.

Speakin’ of rodeo, you all know I’m a dyed-in-the-wool bronc riding fan and I’ve mentioned here how much potential I believed young Taos Muncy to have when he won the World in 2007. I was heartsick when he messed up a leg in ’08 during a Wild Ride at Salinas; and he suffered another broken ankle this spring. It looks like he’s back in full force now, though, having just won the Turquoise Circuit Finals bronc riding title and looking forward to a berth in the Wrangler NFR this year as well as a spot in next year’s Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo in Pocatello. I’ll sure be rootin’ for him… of course along with all our Tri-State hands who always make a mark in the bronc riding event.

Looks like the end of this ol’ lariat rope is comin’ up again…