Impact of COOL on meat industry | TSLN.com

Impact of COOL on meat industry

Amanda Nolz

TSLN photo by Kelsey SnyderMandatory COOL became effective into law on Sept. 30, 2008. Commodities such as whole muscle cuts and ground pork/beef covered under COOL must be labeled at retail to indicate their country of origin. This ground pork label says the meat is "Product of USA, Canada."

Without a doubt, Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) has been a hot topic for debate amongst cattle producer groups, processors and retailers. In a matter of minutes, COOL became the “it” word at most beef industry meetings, and although producers never came to a consensus on the plan and USDA admitted it would have trouble enforcing it, mandatory COOL became effective into law on Sept. 30, 2008. This means commodities, such as whole muscle cuts and ground beef, covered under COOL must be labeled at retail to indicate their country of origin. However, they are excluded from mandatory COOL if they are an ingredient in a processed food item.

Despite the industry’s best intentions to earn a premium in the market place for United States labeled beef products, Don Stewart, Secretary of Agriculture appointee to the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and owner of Stewart-Milling, Inc., disagrees with the law and expressed his views to the producers in attendance at the 2009 Annual South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association’s Trade Show and Convention.

Without a doubt, Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) has been a hot topic for debate amongst cattle producer groups, processors and retailers. In a matter of minutes, COOL became the “it” word at most beef industry meetings, and although producers never came to a consensus on the plan and USDA admitted it would have trouble enforcing it, mandatory COOL became effective into law on Sept. 30, 2008. This means commodities, such as whole muscle cuts and ground beef, covered under COOL must be labeled at retail to indicate their country of origin. However, they are excluded from mandatory COOL if they are an ingredient in a processed food item.

Despite the industry’s best intentions to earn a premium in the market place for United States labeled beef products, Don Stewart, Secretary of Agriculture appointee to the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and owner of Stewart-Milling, Inc., disagrees with the law and expressed his views to the producers in attendance at the 2009 Annual South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association’s Trade Show and Convention.

Without a doubt, Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) has been a hot topic for debate amongst cattle producer groups, processors and retailers. In a matter of minutes, COOL became the “it” word at most beef industry meetings, and although producers never came to a consensus on the plan and USDA admitted it would have trouble enforcing it, mandatory COOL became effective into law on Sept. 30, 2008. This means commodities, such as whole muscle cuts and ground beef, covered under COOL must be labeled at retail to indicate their country of origin. However, they are excluded from mandatory COOL if they are an ingredient in a processed food item.

Despite the industry’s best intentions to earn a premium in the market place for United States labeled beef products, Don Stewart, Secretary of Agriculture appointee to the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and owner of Stewart-Milling, Inc., disagrees with the law and expressed his views to the producers in attendance at the 2009 Annual South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association’s Trade Show and Convention.