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Implement saves time and money

It’s haying season, there’s acres of hay on the ground, but breakdowns and lack of help have put you way behind. Imagine being able to pull into the field and start raking and baling in one pass, turning out a round bale in less than a minute each. Farfetched? Not anymore.

Cecil Scott from Porter, TX, was up against the same problems plaguing most farmers and ranchers: not enough time or help. “The original idea came because of the help situation,” said Scott. “Everybody has the same problem I do with help, so I needed to build something to make it easier.”

Scott had seen a homemade connector that didn’t work very well, but the idea stuck with him. “I decided to build one one weekend. Six weeks and over $25,000 later, I had one built and it worked good the first time,” Scott said, adding, “The first one I saw was on a hydraulic rake, but I’m the only one that does the wheel rakes.”



The Baler Connection goes on an H&S HI-CAP rake or as a bolt-on kit, adaptable to most wheel type rakes. It comes in 12-, 14-, and 16-foot rakes, and other sizes by special order. The Connection comes with a baler-to-monitor power cable, hydraulic lines, and connections for the baler, CV-PTO shaft and hydraulic diverter. No special attachments are needed.

Scott makes the connection for every make of round baler and some centerline small square balers. He has wanted to make a connector for large square balers, but hasn’t been able to obtain the actual torque rating on the shaft from any of the manufacturers.



When in operation, the rake is 24 to 36 feet wide, depending on the size of rake, then closes to eight feet when in the transport position. The rake can be widened or narrowed from the tractor while in operation, thereby making it possible to work around obstacles such as trees or, when into especially heavy hay and not needing to take in the whole width of the swath. It tracks in well behind the baler without cutting corners and each wheel has independent suspension so it can cross rough ground without tearing the rake up.

The Connection is of heavy duty construction. “I was in the steel fabrication business for over 30 years. We built steel structures up to 10 stories high all over the country and they’re all still standing,” he said. “We didn’t cut corners on them and I didn’t on this connector either.”

The bearings in the Connection are capable of 4,500 rpm, while most machinery bearings are at 1,000 or less. “One guy needed a bearing replaced after baling over 105,000 bales using one. Then he bought another one,” said Scott. Maintenance is simply greasing it as required, without over-greasing, which is no different than any other bearing.

“If you wear the rake out, the unit is still good, just bolt it on a new rake,” said Scott, adding, “I’ve built around 300 of them and haven’t heard a bad thing about one yet. No one has ever wanted their money back, never had a complaint. I’ve heard nothing but good and those in the hay business won’t put up hay without one now.”

It’s haying season, there’s acres of hay on the ground, but breakdowns and lack of help have put you way behind. Imagine being able to pull into the field and start raking and baling in one pass, turning out a round bale in less than a minute each. Farfetched? Not anymore.

Cecil Scott from Porter, TX, was up against the same problems plaguing most farmers and ranchers: not enough time or help. “The original idea came because of the help situation,” said Scott. “Everybody has the same problem I do with help, so I needed to build something to make it easier.”

Scott had seen a homemade connector that didn’t work very well, but the idea stuck with him. “I decided to build one one weekend. Six weeks and over $25,000 later, I had one built and it worked good the first time,” Scott said, adding, “The first one I saw was on a hydraulic rake, but I’m the only one that does the wheel rakes.”

The Baler Connection goes on an H&S HI-CAP rake or as a bolt-on kit, adaptable to most wheel type rakes. It comes in 12-, 14-, and 16-foot rakes, and other sizes by special order. The Connection comes with a baler-to-monitor power cable, hydraulic lines, and connections for the baler, CV-PTO shaft and hydraulic diverter. No special attachments are needed.

Scott makes the connection for every make of round baler and some centerline small square balers. He has wanted to make a connector for large square balers, but hasn’t been able to obtain the actual torque rating on the shaft from any of the manufacturers.

When in operation, the rake is 24 to 36 feet wide, depending on the size of rake, then closes to eight feet when in the transport position. The rake can be widened or narrowed from the tractor while in operation, thereby making it possible to work around obstacles such as trees or, when into especially heavy hay and not needing to take in the whole width of the swath. It tracks in well behind the baler without cutting corners and each wheel has independent suspension so it can cross rough ground without tearing the rake up.

The Connection is of heavy duty construction. “I was in the steel fabrication business for over 30 years. We built steel structures up to 10 stories high all over the country and they’re all still standing,” he said. “We didn’t cut corners on them and I didn’t on this connector either.”

The bearings in the Connection are capable of 4,500 rpm, while most machinery bearings are at 1,000 or less. “One guy needed a bearing replaced after baling over 105,000 bales using one. Then he bought another one,” said Scott. Maintenance is simply greasing it as required, without over-greasing, which is no different than any other bearing.

“If you wear the rake out, the unit is still good, just bolt it on a new rake,” said Scott, adding, “I’ve built around 300 of them and haven’t heard a bad thing about one yet. No one has ever wanted their money back, never had a complaint. I’ve heard nothing but good and those in the hay business won’t put up hay without one now.”

It’s haying season, there’s acres of hay on the ground, but breakdowns and lack of help have put you way behind. Imagine being able to pull into the field and start raking and baling in one pass, turning out a round bale in less than a minute each. Farfetched? Not anymore.

Cecil Scott from Porter, TX, was up against the same problems plaguing most farmers and ranchers: not enough time or help. “The original idea came because of the help situation,” said Scott. “Everybody has the same problem I do with help, so I needed to build something to make it easier.”

Scott had seen a homemade connector that didn’t work very well, but the idea stuck with him. “I decided to build one one weekend. Six weeks and over $25,000 later, I had one built and it worked good the first time,” Scott said, adding, “The first one I saw was on a hydraulic rake, but I’m the only one that does the wheel rakes.”

The Baler Connection goes on an H&S HI-CAP rake or as a bolt-on kit, adaptable to most wheel type rakes. It comes in 12-, 14-, and 16-foot rakes, and other sizes by special order. The Connection comes with a baler-to-monitor power cable, hydraulic lines, and connections for the baler, CV-PTO shaft and hydraulic diverter. No special attachments are needed.

Scott makes the connection for every make of round baler and some centerline small square balers. He has wanted to make a connector for large square balers, but hasn’t been able to obtain the actual torque rating on the shaft from any of the manufacturers.

When in operation, the rake is 24 to 36 feet wide, depending on the size of rake, then closes to eight feet when in the transport position. The rake can be widened or narrowed from the tractor while in operation, thereby making it possible to work around obstacles such as trees or, when into especially heavy hay and not needing to take in the whole width of the swath. It tracks in well behind the baler without cutting corners and each wheel has independent suspension so it can cross rough ground without tearing the rake up.

The Connection is of heavy duty construction. “I was in the steel fabrication business for over 30 years. We built steel structures up to 10 stories high all over the country and they’re all still standing,” he said. “We didn’t cut corners on them and I didn’t on this connector either.”

The bearings in the Connection are capable of 4,500 rpm, while most machinery bearings are at 1,000 or less. “One guy needed a bearing replaced after baling over 105,000 bales using one. Then he bought another one,” said Scott. Maintenance is simply greasing it as required, without over-greasing, which is no different than any other bearing.

“If you wear the rake out, the unit is still good, just bolt it on a new rake,” said Scott, adding, “I’ve built around 300 of them and haven’t heard a bad thing about one yet. No one has ever wanted their money back, never had a complaint. I’ve heard nothing but good and those in the hay business won’t put up hay without one now.”

It’s haying season, there’s acres of hay on the ground, but breakdowns and lack of help have put you way behind. Imagine being able to pull into the field and start raking and baling in one pass, turning out a round bale in less than a minute each. Farfetched? Not anymore.

Cecil Scott from Porter, TX, was up against the same problems plaguing most farmers and ranchers: not enough time or help. “The original idea came because of the help situation,” said Scott. “Everybody has the same problem I do with help, so I needed to build something to make it easier.”

Scott had seen a homemade connector that didn’t work very well, but the idea stuck with him. “I decided to build one one weekend. Six weeks and over $25,000 later, I had one built and it worked good the first time,” Scott said, adding, “The first one I saw was on a hydraulic rake, but I’m the only one that does the wheel rakes.”

The Baler Connection goes on an H&S HI-CAP rake or as a bolt-on kit, adaptable to most wheel type rakes. It comes in 12-, 14-, and 16-foot rakes, and other sizes by special order. The Connection comes with a baler-to-monitor power cable, hydraulic lines, and connections for the baler, CV-PTO shaft and hydraulic diverter. No special attachments are needed.

Scott makes the connection for every make of round baler and some centerline small square balers. He has wanted to make a connector for large square balers, but hasn’t been able to obtain the actual torque rating on the shaft from any of the manufacturers.

When in operation, the rake is 24 to 36 feet wide, depending on the size of rake, then closes to eight feet when in the transport position. The rake can be widened or narrowed from the tractor while in operation, thereby making it possible to work around obstacles such as trees or, when into especially heavy hay and not needing to take in the whole width of the swath. It tracks in well behind the baler without cutting corners and each wheel has independent suspension so it can cross rough ground without tearing the rake up.

The Connection is of heavy duty construction. “I was in the steel fabrication business for over 30 years. We built steel structures up to 10 stories high all over the country and they’re all still standing,” he said. “We didn’t cut corners on them and I didn’t on this connector either.”

The bearings in the Connection are capable of 4,500 rpm, while most machinery bearings are at 1,000 or less. “One guy needed a bearing replaced after baling over 105,000 bales using one. Then he bought another one,” said Scott. Maintenance is simply greasing it as required, without over-greasing, which is no different than any other bearing.

“If you wear the rake out, the unit is still good, just bolt it on a new rake,” said Scott, adding, “I’ve built around 300 of them and haven’t heard a bad thing about one yet. No one has ever wanted their money back, never had a complaint. I’ve heard nothing but good and those in the hay business won’t put up hay without one now.”


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