Importance of managing and controlling coccidiosis in this year’s calf crop | TSLN.com

Importance of managing and controlling coccidiosis in this year’s calf crop

Steve Paisley

This year’s precipitation patterns has left us with an abundance of grass and full reservoirs, but damp soils and full ponds may have also increased the chance for coccidiosis problems, even on range. In the last two weeks, I’ve received a handful of calls where calves, still on range with their mothers, are showing signs of coccidiosis. As discussed later, it is important to address any signs of coccidiosis as soon as possible, as coccidia outbreaks can have longer term impacts, even after the infection is cleared up.

Coccidiosis, caused by a single celled organism called protozoa of the genus Eimeria, results in health and economic problems to several classes of livestock. The disease reduces feed consumption, body weight, and feed efficiency and may cause mortality of 24 percent in some cases if left untreated. Coccidiosis commonly affects young cattle up to two years of age. Animals housed in proximity are more likely to contract the disease. Therefore, feedlot and dairy cattle are most susceptible. However, this summer’s above average rainfall and damp conditions have even resulted in coccidiosis cases found in grazing herds. Additional contributing factors to coccidiosis outbreaks include exposure to stress caused by shipping, changes in ration and in weather, and overcrowding. Stress caused by weaning makes calves very susceptible to coccidiosis.

This year’s precipitation patterns has left us with an abundance of grass and full reservoirs, but damp soils and full ponds may have also increased the chance for coccidiosis problems, even on range. In the last two weeks, I’ve received a handful of calls where calves, still on range with their mothers, are showing signs of coccidiosis. As discussed later, it is important to address any signs of coccidiosis as soon as possible, as coccidia outbreaks can have longer term impacts, even after the infection is cleared up.

Coccidiosis, caused by a single celled organism called protozoa of the genus Eimeria, results in health and economic problems to several classes of livestock. The disease reduces feed consumption, body weight, and feed efficiency and may cause mortality of 24 percent in some cases if left untreated. Coccidiosis commonly affects young cattle up to two years of age. Animals housed in proximity are more likely to contract the disease. Therefore, feedlot and dairy cattle are most susceptible. However, this summer’s above average rainfall and damp conditions have even resulted in coccidiosis cases found in grazing herds. Additional contributing factors to coccidiosis outbreaks include exposure to stress caused by shipping, changes in ration and in weather, and overcrowding. Stress caused by weaning makes calves very susceptible to coccidiosis.

This year’s precipitation patterns has left us with an abundance of grass and full reservoirs, but damp soils and full ponds may have also increased the chance for coccidiosis problems, even on range. In the last two weeks, I’ve received a handful of calls where calves, still on range with their mothers, are showing signs of coccidiosis. As discussed later, it is important to address any signs of coccidiosis as soon as possible, as coccidia outbreaks can have longer term impacts, even after the infection is cleared up.

Coccidiosis, caused by a single celled organism called protozoa of the genus Eimeria, results in health and economic problems to several classes of livestock. The disease reduces feed consumption, body weight, and feed efficiency and may cause mortality of 24 percent in some cases if left untreated. Coccidiosis commonly affects young cattle up to two years of age. Animals housed in proximity are more likely to contract the disease. Therefore, feedlot and dairy cattle are most susceptible. However, this summer’s above average rainfall and damp conditions have even resulted in coccidiosis cases found in grazing herds. Additional contributing factors to coccidiosis outbreaks include exposure to stress caused by shipping, changes in ration and in weather, and overcrowding. Stress caused by weaning makes calves very susceptible to coccidiosis.

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This year’s precipitation patterns has left us with an abundance of grass and full reservoirs, but damp soils and full ponds may have also increased the chance for coccidiosis problems, even on range. In the last two weeks, I’ve received a handful of calls where calves, still on range with their mothers, are showing signs of coccidiosis. As discussed later, it is important to address any signs of coccidiosis as soon as possible, as coccidia outbreaks can have longer term impacts, even after the infection is cleared up.

Coccidiosis, caused by a single celled organism called protozoa of the genus Eimeria, results in health and economic problems to several classes of livestock. The disease reduces feed consumption, body weight, and feed efficiency and may cause mortality of 24 percent in some cases if left untreated. Coccidiosis commonly affects young cattle up to two years of age. Animals housed in proximity are more likely to contract the disease. Therefore, feedlot and dairy cattle are most susceptible. However, this summer’s above average rainfall and damp conditions have even resulted in coccidiosis cases found in grazing herds. Additional contributing factors to coccidiosis outbreaks include exposure to stress caused by shipping, changes in ration and in weather, and overcrowding. Stress caused by weaning makes calves very susceptible to coccidiosis.

This year’s precipitation patterns has left us with an abundance of grass and full reservoirs, but damp soils and full ponds may have also increased the chance for coccidiosis problems, even on range. In the last two weeks, I’ve received a handful of calls where calves, still on range with their mothers, are showing signs of coccidiosis. As discussed later, it is important to address any signs of coccidiosis as soon as possible, as coccidia outbreaks can have longer term impacts, even after the infection is cleared up.

Coccidiosis, caused by a single celled organism called protozoa of the genus Eimeria, results in health and economic problems to several classes of livestock. The disease reduces feed consumption, body weight, and feed efficiency and may cause mortality of 24 percent in some cases if left untreated. Coccidiosis commonly affects young cattle up to two years of age. Animals housed in proximity are more likely to contract the disease. Therefore, feedlot and dairy cattle are most susceptible. However, this summer’s above average rainfall and damp conditions have even resulted in coccidiosis cases found in grazing herds. Additional contributing factors to coccidiosis outbreaks include exposure to stress caused by shipping, changes in ration and in weather, and overcrowding. Stress caused by weaning makes calves very susceptible to coccidiosis.

This year’s precipitation patterns has left us with an abundance of grass and full reservoirs, but damp soils and full ponds may have also increased the chance for coccidiosis problems, even on range. In the last two weeks, I’ve received a handful of calls where calves, still on range with their mothers, are showing signs of coccidiosis. As discussed later, it is important to address any signs of coccidiosis as soon as possible, as coccidia outbreaks can have longer term impacts, even after the infection is cleared up.

Coccidiosis, caused by a single celled organism called protozoa of the genus Eimeria, results in health and economic problems to several classes of livestock. The disease reduces feed consumption, body weight, and feed efficiency and may cause mortality of 24 percent in some cases if left untreated. Coccidiosis commonly affects young cattle up to two years of age. Animals housed in proximity are more likely to contract the disease. Therefore, feedlot and dairy cattle are most susceptible. However, this summer’s above average rainfall and damp conditions have even resulted in coccidiosis cases found in grazing herds. Additional contributing factors to coccidiosis outbreaks include exposure to stress caused by shipping, changes in ration and in weather, and overcrowding. Stress caused by weaning makes calves very susceptible to coccidiosis.

This year’s precipitation patterns has left us with an abundance of grass and full reservoirs, but damp soils and full ponds may have also increased the chance for coccidiosis problems, even on range. In the last two weeks, I’ve received a handful of calls where calves, still on range with their mothers, are showing signs of coccidiosis. As discussed later, it is important to address any signs of coccidiosis as soon as possible, as coccidia outbreaks can have longer term impacts, even after the infection is cleared up.

Coccidiosis, caused by a single celled organism called protozoa of the genus Eimeria, results in health and economic problems to several classes of livestock. The disease reduces feed consumption, body weight, and feed efficiency and may cause mortality of 24 percent in some cases if left untreated. Coccidiosis commonly affects young cattle up to two years of age. Animals housed in proximity are more likely to contract the disease. Therefore, feedlot and dairy cattle are most susceptible. However, this summer’s above average rainfall and damp conditions have even resulted in coccidiosis cases found in grazing herds. Additional contributing factors to coccidiosis outbreaks include exposure to stress caused by shipping, changes in ration and in weather, and overcrowding. Stress caused by weaning makes calves very susceptible to coccidiosis.