Injections sites and lesions: What you need to know | TSLN.com
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Injections sites and lesions: What you need to know

Amanda Nolz

“If someone who had no clue what a beef operation was like, what would they think about your operation and the way you care for your animals?” asked Jerry Stokka, a senior veterinarian for Pfizer Animal Health, at the Beef Is Our Business Summer Seminar, held on July 29, 2010 in Mitchell, SD.

“Our climate has changed, and we have to start thinking more about the end product and how our consumers view us,” he added.

Stokka’s presentation featured three euthanized animals, who were in a chronic stage and had been given several antibiotics and vaccinations to demonstrate how lesions occur at injection sites, ultimately destroying the quality of the meat. In his demonstration, he urged producers to consider Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) protocols to eliminate these injection site issues.

“If someone who had no clue what a beef operation was like, what would they think about your operation and the way you care for your animals?” asked Jerry Stokka, a senior veterinarian for Pfizer Animal Health, at the Beef Is Our Business Summer Seminar, held on July 29, 2010 in Mitchell, SD.

“Our climate has changed, and we have to start thinking more about the end product and how our consumers view us,” he added.

Stokka’s presentation featured three euthanized animals, who were in a chronic stage and had been given several antibiotics and vaccinations to demonstrate how lesions occur at injection sites, ultimately destroying the quality of the meat. In his demonstration, he urged producers to consider Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) protocols to eliminate these injection site issues.

“If someone who had no clue what a beef operation was like, what would they think about your operation and the way you care for your animals?” asked Jerry Stokka, a senior veterinarian for Pfizer Animal Health, at the Beef Is Our Business Summer Seminar, held on July 29, 2010 in Mitchell, SD.

“Our climate has changed, and we have to start thinking more about the end product and how our consumers view us,” he added.

Stokka’s presentation featured three euthanized animals, who were in a chronic stage and had been given several antibiotics and vaccinations to demonstrate how lesions occur at injection sites, ultimately destroying the quality of the meat. In his demonstration, he urged producers to consider Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) protocols to eliminate these injection site issues.


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