Introducing the 2010 National Beef Ambassadors | TSLN.com

Introducing the 2010 National Beef Ambassadors

Amanda Nolz

Photo by Amanda NolzThe 2010 National Beef Ambassadors, from left to right: Malorie Bankhead (California), Rebecca Vraspir (Wyoming), Ellen Hoffschneider (Nebraska), Jackson Alexander (Oklahoma), and Mandy-Jo Laurent (Texas).

Each year, five outstanding young people are selected to work on behalf of America’s cattle producers as National Beef Ambassadors. These ambassadors use their talents to spread the positive message about beef nutrition, food safety and cattle production. Often, this means speaking out when nobody else will, or taking a stand on a controversial issue when the rest of the industry stays quiet. These ambassadors aren’t afraid to tackle the challenges that face producers today, and they do so by effectively communicating online, at consumer events and on their college campuses.

The 2010 National Beef Ambassador competition was held in Fort Smith, AR on Oct. 9-11, 2009, and 17 young people from across the country vied for the five spots on the team. The event includes four competitive sections to test the talents of the participants. The first is a consumer panel, where ambassadors serve beef samples while fielding questions from average consumers. The second is an intense television and radio interview, where myths are debunked and facts are shared. The third section is an issues response, where ambassadors write a letter to the editor about an article they have recently read. Finally, the fourth section is a summary of their agriculture in the classroom outreach programs. After tallying up the points in each section, five students are selected to represent beef producers.

Each year, five outstanding young people are selected to work on behalf of America’s cattle producers as National Beef Ambassadors. These ambassadors use their talents to spread the positive message about beef nutrition, food safety and cattle production. Often, this means speaking out when nobody else will, or taking a stand on a controversial issue when the rest of the industry stays quiet. These ambassadors aren’t afraid to tackle the challenges that face producers today, and they do so by effectively communicating online, at consumer events and on their college campuses.

The 2010 National Beef Ambassador competition was held in Fort Smith, AR on Oct. 9-11, 2009, and 17 young people from across the country vied for the five spots on the team. The event includes four competitive sections to test the talents of the participants. The first is a consumer panel, where ambassadors serve beef samples while fielding questions from average consumers. The second is an intense television and radio interview, where myths are debunked and facts are shared. The third section is an issues response, where ambassadors write a letter to the editor about an article they have recently read. Finally, the fourth section is a summary of their agriculture in the classroom outreach programs. After tallying up the points in each section, five students are selected to represent beef producers.

Each year, five outstanding young people are selected to work on behalf of America’s cattle producers as National Beef Ambassadors. These ambassadors use their talents to spread the positive message about beef nutrition, food safety and cattle production. Often, this means speaking out when nobody else will, or taking a stand on a controversial issue when the rest of the industry stays quiet. These ambassadors aren’t afraid to tackle the challenges that face producers today, and they do so by effectively communicating online, at consumer events and on their college campuses.

The 2010 National Beef Ambassador competition was held in Fort Smith, AR on Oct. 9-11, 2009, and 17 young people from across the country vied for the five spots on the team. The event includes four competitive sections to test the talents of the participants. The first is a consumer panel, where ambassadors serve beef samples while fielding questions from average consumers. The second is an intense television and radio interview, where myths are debunked and facts are shared. The third section is an issues response, where ambassadors write a letter to the editor about an article they have recently read. Finally, the fourth section is a summary of their agriculture in the classroom outreach programs. After tallying up the points in each section, five students are selected to represent beef producers.