Johnson Black Simmental – Taking advantage of heterosis | TSLN.com

Johnson Black Simmental – Taking advantage of heterosis

TSLN photos by Doug HoganJohnson Black Simmental cattle in the yard during their annual bull sale held at the Bull Palace, Baker, MT.

Cody and Brenda Johnson raise black Simmental cattle near Baker, MT, 80 miles from Miles City. Cody started ranching there with his father more than 35 years ago.

“We’ve always had black and black-baldy cows,” says Cody. Years ago they always sold their calves to the same feeder, in Michigan. At that time they were using Hereford bulls on black cows, and raising black-baldy bulls to breed to black-baldy cows, because that cross was very popular.

The cattle feeder wanted them to start using Simmental bulls. That was in 1974 when Cody was 18, and they had about 900 cows.

“We wanted to keep our cows black, so we bought some purebred Angus cows and found a black Simmental bull and started raising calves from him,” says Cody. “The next year we found a black-baldy Simmental bull in North Dakota and put him with those cows.

“We started raising our own bulls. Neighbors who came to our brandings liked the looks of our calves because they were so much bigger than anyone else’s, and they wanted some of our bulls. We sold some private treaty, for a couple of years then my dad and I decided we would start raising bulls.”

Cody said they still couldn’t find any black Simmental bulls to buy.

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Cody and Brenda Johnson raise black Simmental cattle near Baker, MT, 80 miles from Miles City. Cody started ranching there with his father more than 35 years ago.

“We’ve always had black and black-baldy cows,” says Cody. Years ago they always sold their calves to the same feeder, in Michigan. At that time they were using Hereford bulls on black cows, and raising black-baldy bulls to breed to black-baldy cows, because that cross was very popular.

The cattle feeder wanted them to start using Simmental bulls. That was in 1974 when Cody was 18, and they had about 900 cows.

“We wanted to keep our cows black, so we bought some purebred Angus cows and found a black Simmental bull and started raising calves from him,” says Cody. “The next year we found a black-baldy Simmental bull in North Dakota and put him with those cows.

“We started raising our own bulls. Neighbors who came to our brandings liked the looks of our calves because they were so much bigger than anyone else’s, and they wanted some of our bulls. We sold some private treaty, for a couple of years then my dad and I decided we would start raising bulls.”

Cody said they still couldn’t find any black Simmental bulls to buy.

Cody and Brenda Johnson raise black Simmental cattle near Baker, MT, 80 miles from Miles City. Cody started ranching there with his father more than 35 years ago.

“We’ve always had black and black-baldy cows,” says Cody. Years ago they always sold their calves to the same feeder, in Michigan. At that time they were using Hereford bulls on black cows, and raising black-baldy bulls to breed to black-baldy cows, because that cross was very popular.

The cattle feeder wanted them to start using Simmental bulls. That was in 1974 when Cody was 18, and they had about 900 cows.

“We wanted to keep our cows black, so we bought some purebred Angus cows and found a black Simmental bull and started raising calves from him,” says Cody. “The next year we found a black-baldy Simmental bull in North Dakota and put him with those cows.

“We started raising our own bulls. Neighbors who came to our brandings liked the looks of our calves because they were so much bigger than anyone else’s, and they wanted some of our bulls. We sold some private treaty, for a couple of years then my dad and I decided we would start raising bulls.”

Cody said they still couldn’t find any black Simmental bulls to buy.

Cody and Brenda Johnson raise black Simmental cattle near Baker, MT, 80 miles from Miles City. Cody started ranching there with his father more than 35 years ago.

“We’ve always had black and black-baldy cows,” says Cody. Years ago they always sold their calves to the same feeder, in Michigan. At that time they were using Hereford bulls on black cows, and raising black-baldy bulls to breed to black-baldy cows, because that cross was very popular.

The cattle feeder wanted them to start using Simmental bulls. That was in 1974 when Cody was 18, and they had about 900 cows.

“We wanted to keep our cows black, so we bought some purebred Angus cows and found a black Simmental bull and started raising calves from him,” says Cody. “The next year we found a black-baldy Simmental bull in North Dakota and put him with those cows.

“We started raising our own bulls. Neighbors who came to our brandings liked the looks of our calves because they were so much bigger than anyone else’s, and they wanted some of our bulls. We sold some private treaty, for a couple of years then my dad and I decided we would start raising bulls.”

Cody said they still couldn’t find any black Simmental bulls to buy.

Cody and Brenda Johnson raise black Simmental cattle near Baker, MT, 80 miles from Miles City. Cody started ranching there with his father more than 35 years ago.

“We’ve always had black and black-baldy cows,” says Cody. Years ago they always sold their calves to the same feeder, in Michigan. At that time they were using Hereford bulls on black cows, and raising black-baldy bulls to breed to black-baldy cows, because that cross was very popular.

The cattle feeder wanted them to start using Simmental bulls. That was in 1974 when Cody was 18, and they had about 900 cows.

“We wanted to keep our cows black, so we bought some purebred Angus cows and found a black Simmental bull and started raising calves from him,” says Cody. “The next year we found a black-baldy Simmental bull in North Dakota and put him with those cows.

“We started raising our own bulls. Neighbors who came to our brandings liked the looks of our calves because they were so much bigger than anyone else’s, and they wanted some of our bulls. We sold some private treaty, for a couple of years then my dad and I decided we would start raising bulls.”

Cody said they still couldn’t find any black Simmental bulls to buy.

Cody and Brenda Johnson raise black Simmental cattle near Baker, MT, 80 miles from Miles City. Cody started ranching there with his father more than 35 years ago.

“We’ve always had black and black-baldy cows,” says Cody. Years ago they always sold their calves to the same feeder, in Michigan. At that time they were using Hereford bulls on black cows, and raising black-baldy bulls to breed to black-baldy cows, because that cross was very popular.

The cattle feeder wanted them to start using Simmental bulls. That was in 1974 when Cody was 18, and they had about 900 cows.

“We wanted to keep our cows black, so we bought some purebred Angus cows and found a black Simmental bull and started raising calves from him,” says Cody. “The next year we found a black-baldy Simmental bull in North Dakota and put him with those cows.

“We started raising our own bulls. Neighbors who came to our brandings liked the looks of our calves because they were so much bigger than anyone else’s, and they wanted some of our bulls. We sold some private treaty, for a couple of years then my dad and I decided we would start raising bulls.”

Cody said they still couldn’t find any black Simmental bulls to buy.