Kerri Allardyce wins 2011 PRCA Excellence in Rodeo Photography award | TSLN.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Kerri Allardyce wins 2011 PRCA Excellence in Rodeo Photography award

It’s been said that a picture is worth a thousand words. No truer does that ring than in the rodeo arena where seeing a competitor’s grimace, the contortion of a horse’s hooves, or the lasso finding its mark is preferable to reading about it.

With more than a decade of experience under her belt, rodeo photographer Kerri Allardyce earned a big cowboy nod at this year’s Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (NFR). Just before the 10-day rodeo event kicked off, Allardyce received the Excellence in Rodeo Photography award at the 2011 Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) awards banquet held Nov. 30 in Las Vegas, NV. The award is one of three that recognizes media, in addition to contract acts, rodeo committees and roughstock.

Allardyce, who owns Cowboy Images rodeo photography business and lives in Rapid City, SD, said she was very honored to receive the award. “We work really hard, and I really appreciate it when someone recognizes what you do,” Allardyce said in a telephone interview.



The award, which was first given in 1999, recognizes photographers who aid the PRCA in an effort to promote the sport of rodeo, according to Kendra Santos, PRCA Director of Communications.

“We rely on these photographers. Images are crucial in our effort to promote and grow the sport of rodeo,” Santos said. “There’s a teamwork factor involved and we consider what they’ve done to help us do our job.”



The award recognizes more than just one fantastic photograph, encompassing a photographer’s entire body of work and commitment to the sport. “The award is based on a person’s lifetime achievement, and what they do the year we give the award,” Santos explained.

Allardyce’s recognition places her among notable rodeo photographers Louise Serpa, Jim Fain, Gene Hyder and Dan Hubbell.

“Kerri takes great action photography, but her behind-the-scenes images are really special, too,” Santos said.

Photographers can purchase a PRCA membership card, just like announcers, clowns or specialty acts. Allardyce received her PRCA card in 2002; 2011 marks the eighth year she’s been hired as an official behind-the-scenes NFR photographer.

“I do all of the behind-the-scenes events and specialty events,” Allardyce said, explaining that two photographers handle arena photography, and one covers events outside of the arena.

“The PRCA hires Kerri; we choose her and own the rights to her photos. It’s based on talent and how well we work as a team,” Santos said of the NFR photographer selection process. “The pressure runs pretty high out there. A photographer has to get the shots, edit the shots, work well on a team and under the pressure of pretty tight deadlines.”

“The best part of my job is the people I meet,” she said. “There are really wonderful people in rodeo – maybe not the most famous, but the most honorable. I’ve shook hands with four-star Generals; that’s quite an honor.”

It’s been said that a picture is worth a thousand words. No truer does that ring than in the rodeo arena where seeing a competitor’s grimace, the contortion of a horse’s hooves, or the lasso finding its mark is preferable to reading about it.

With more than a decade of experience under her belt, rodeo photographer Kerri Allardyce earned a big cowboy nod at this year’s Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (NFR). Just before the 10-day rodeo event kicked off, Allardyce received the Excellence in Rodeo Photography award at the 2011 Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) awards banquet held Nov. 30 in Las Vegas, NV. The award is one of three that recognizes media, in addition to contract acts, rodeo committees and roughstock.

Allardyce, who owns Cowboy Images rodeo photography business and lives in Rapid City, SD, said she was very honored to receive the award. “We work really hard, and I really appreciate it when someone recognizes what you do,” Allardyce said in a telephone interview.

The award, which was first given in 1999, recognizes photographers who aid the PRCA in an effort to promote the sport of rodeo, according to Kendra Santos, PRCA Director of Communications.

“We rely on these photographers. Images are crucial in our effort to promote and grow the sport of rodeo,” Santos said. “There’s a teamwork factor involved and we consider what they’ve done to help us do our job.”

The award recognizes more than just one fantastic photograph, encompassing a photographer’s entire body of work and commitment to the sport. “The award is based on a person’s lifetime achievement, and what they do the year we give the award,” Santos explained.

Allardyce’s recognition places her among notable rodeo photographers Louise Serpa, Jim Fain, Gene Hyder and Dan Hubbell.

“Kerri takes great action photography, but her behind-the-scenes images are really special, too,” Santos said.

Photographers can purchase a PRCA membership card, just like announcers, clowns or specialty acts. Allardyce received her PRCA card in 2002; 2011 marks the eighth year she’s been hired as an official behind-the-scenes NFR photographer.

“I do all of the behind-the-scenes events and specialty events,” Allardyce said, explaining that two photographers handle arena photography, and one covers events outside of the arena.

“The PRCA hires Kerri; we choose her and own the rights to her photos. It’s based on talent and how well we work as a team,” Santos said of the NFR photographer selection process. “The pressure runs pretty high out there. A photographer has to get the shots, edit the shots, work well on a team and under the pressure of pretty tight deadlines.”

“The best part of my job is the people I meet,” she said. “There are really wonderful people in rodeo – maybe not the most famous, but the most honorable. I’ve shook hands with four-star Generals; that’s quite an honor.”


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User