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Kindsfater Angus: Still raising the right kind

Photo by Jan Swan WoodThe trees along the Redwater River are the backdrop for this good cow/calf pair at Kindsfater Angus.

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Near where the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers converge, lies a farm that has been in the Kindsfater family since the 1920’s. Operated today by Alan and Mary Beth Kindsfater, and their family, Katy, David and Adam, its rich soil produces crops and hay that support a registered Angus cowherd and a small commercial feedlot.

After Alan and his brother dissolved their partnership, Alan and his family took the reins of the farm in 1997, running both registered and commercial cows, plus sheep for many of the ensuing years. Focused entirely on the registered Angus herd today, they produce a modest number of exceptional bulls and heifers that are offered to the public private treaty.

The first registered cows were bought in 1986 from Alan’s uncle, Dave Kindsfater. To these cows they added some heifer calves from another breeder, thus putting in place the foundation of their cowherd. No other females have ever been added to the cowherd.



“Those first cows from Uncle Dave were a good fit for us. They did what we expected them to do so we stayed with them,” says Alan.

Trouble-free cattle were his goal and he has maintained that type over the years. In describing his ideal cow, Kindsfater says, “She has to be feminine, be able to maintain her body condition and breed back on time.” He added, “She has to do a good job every year. Our culling program is that they get two shots at an average calf or better, then if she hasn’t done that, she is culled.”



The disposition is very important to Kindsfater. “They have to be easy to handle because we A.I. without synching them, calve them in lots and weigh and tag every calf. We have to be able to work with them.

“We A.I. the cows one cycle then use a good clean-up bull. Late calving cows go to the clean-up bull,” adds Kindsfater.

The Kindsfater cows are calved through sheds in March, then the pairs go to grass in May. The cows are ridden on to heat detect on pasture. They stay on pasture until November, then are brought home to the big lots until calving.

“We wean the bull calves around Oct. 1st, then the heifers the end of October. They are preconditioned before that,” says Kindsfater.

The calves get no creep while on pasture, just good grass and their mother’s milk. They are vaccinated spring and fall and poured for internal and external parasites.

The cows are wintered on straight hay with some protein barrels in the spring after calving. The heifer calves are wintered on hay with limited grain. The bull calves are wintered on ground hay and corn, with a goal weight gain of three pounds per day. All are on a mineral program as well. “A good mineral program has kept things working like they are supposed to,” says Kindsfater.

Kindsfater studies pedigrees and performance on the bulls he uses for A.I. He seeks a moderate birth weight, with an EPD of less than 2.5, and a plus scrotal EPD. “We want good growth but also look at pedigrees that will make good cows,” says Kindsfater. “I do a lot of research on the prospective herd sires to avoid genetic defects. We don’t chase one particular trait either, but want a balanced pedigree. We’ve also avoided fads in the breed.

“About 10 years ago, Jim Willson of Crook Mountain Angus told me I needed to figure out a program, do it and do it well. You do that and you’ll find people who will follow your program. Build your cowherd with the traits that are important to you and it will work. That’s the best advice I ever got. So far, it’s worked.”

The Kindsfaters market their bulls private treaty, but with a little different twist. Past bull customers are invited to the farm on a specific date to bid only against each other for the bulls. A base price is in place for each bull, and a sheet is in hand with all of the pertinent information on the bulls.

The private treaty sale for 2010 was held on Feb. 20th. Leading up to the sale, many had been to the farm to look through the bulls, so had a good idea what they were after. Several simply bid over the phone for their choices, being unable to be there on sale day.

The yearling bulls were in pens of five and were gentle and easy to walk through and study for those last minute decisions. The sale started promptly at 1 p.m. and was over before 1:30. Alan Kindsfater started each bull and asked for bid raises in a slow paced, neighborly fashion. He and daughter Katy called phone bidders when the bull they were interested in was being sold so they could be in on the action. Most of the bulls sold that day, though some exceptional bulls were left for sale to anyone else, private treaty.

After the bulls had all been gone through and the purchases made, the group was treated to a late lunch and visit at the American West Steakhouse in Belle Fourche, SD. The paperwork was completed there and checks written for the bulls.

When asked what gave him the idea, Alan explained, “We wanted to give people that have supported us first chance to buys bulls, so we set a date, then call all past buyers and invite them.” Some customers have been using Kindsfater bulls for 15 years or more, so the Kindsfaters want to make it easy for them to continue.

On sale day, the yearling bulls were in their winter clothes, offered just as they are, no haircuts or primping. All were masculine, well developed bulls, with good feet, plenty of volume, good heads and plenty of muscle.

Kindsfaters have a first breeding season guarantee on the bulls, keep them until May and all the bulls are semen tested in early April.

The yearling heifers are also sold private treaty as commercial heifers. They are grown out nicely, but not overfed. If they don’t sell private treaty, they are sold at the sale barn, and are of the quality to become exceptional cows for whoever purchases them.

When asked what Kindsfater appreciated most about the Angus breed, he said, “Besides just being good, all around cattle, the Angus breed is a frontrunner as far as doing things to promote it, like Certified Angus Beef. They’ve been very progressive in marketing and the Association does a good job getting Angus beef exposed to the public in a good way. That’s been really good for the breed.”

So, what does the future hold for Kindsfater Angus? “God willing, I don’t see a lot of changes as far as numbers or type. We’ll keep trying to raise good, functional cattle that keep people coming back to buy bulls,” says Kindsfater.

So far, that philosophy has kept buyers coming back for more for many years. A solid program that turns out predictable cattle is what’s made them successful and that isn’t going to change.

Near where the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers converge, lies a farm that has been in the Kindsfater family since the 1920’s. Operated today by Alan and Mary Beth Kindsfater, and their family, Katy, David and Adam, its rich soil produces crops and hay that support a registered Angus cowherd and a small commercial feedlot.

After Alan and his brother dissolved their partnership, Alan and his family took the reins of the farm in 1997, running both registered and commercial cows, plus sheep for many of the ensuing years. Focused entirely on the registered Angus herd today, they produce a modest number of exceptional bulls and heifers that are offered to the public private treaty.

The first registered cows were bought in 1986 from Alan’s uncle, Dave Kindsfater. To these cows they added some heifer calves from another breeder, thus putting in place the foundation of their cowherd. No other females have ever been added to the cowherd.

“Those first cows from Uncle Dave were a good fit for us. They did what we expected them to do so we stayed with them,” says Alan.

Trouble-free cattle were his goal and he has maintained that type over the years. In describing his ideal cow, Kindsfater says, “She has to be feminine, be able to maintain her body condition and breed back on time.” He added, “She has to do a good job every year. Our culling program is that they get two shots at an average calf or better, then if she hasn’t done that, she is culled.”

The disposition is very important to Kindsfater. “They have to be easy to handle because we A.I. without synching them, calve them in lots and weigh and tag every calf. We have to be able to work with them.

“We A.I. the cows one cycle then use a good clean-up bull. Late calving cows go to the clean-up bull,” adds Kindsfater.

The Kindsfater cows are calved through sheds in March, then the pairs go to grass in May. The cows are ridden on to heat detect on pasture. They stay on pasture until November, then are brought home to the big lots until calving.

“We wean the bull calves around Oct. 1st, then the heifers the end of October. They are preconditioned before that,” says Kindsfater.

The calves get no creep while on pasture, just good grass and their mother’s milk. They are vaccinated spring and fall and poured for internal and external parasites.

The cows are wintered on straight hay with some protein barrels in the spring after calving. The heifer calves are wintered on hay with limited grain. The bull calves are wintered on ground hay and corn, with a goal weight gain of three pounds per day. All are on a mineral program as well. “A good mineral program has kept things working like they are supposed to,” says Kindsfater.

Kindsfater studies pedigrees and performance on the bulls he uses for A.I. He seeks a moderate birth weight, with an EPD of less than 2.5, and a plus scrotal EPD. “We want good growth but also look at pedigrees that will make good cows,” says Kindsfater. “I do a lot of research on the prospective herd sires to avoid genetic defects. We don’t chase one particular trait either, but want a balanced pedigree. We’ve also avoided fads in the breed.

“About 10 years ago, Jim Willson of Crook Mountain Angus told me I needed to figure out a program, do it and do it well. You do that and you’ll find people who will follow your program. Build your cowherd with the traits that are important to you and it will work. That’s the best advice I ever got. So far, it’s worked.”

The Kindsfaters market their bulls private treaty, but with a little different twist. Past bull customers are invited to the farm on a specific date to bid only against each other for the bulls. A base price is in place for each bull, and a sheet is in hand with all of the pertinent information on the bulls.

The private treaty sale for 2010 was held on Feb. 20th. Leading up to the sale, many had been to the farm to look through the bulls, so had a good idea what they were after. Several simply bid over the phone for their choices, being unable to be there on sale day.

The yearling bulls were in pens of five and were gentle and easy to walk through and study for those last minute decisions. The sale started promptly at 1 p.m. and was over before 1:30. Alan Kindsfater started each bull and asked for bid raises in a slow paced, neighborly fashion. He and daughter Katy called phone bidders when the bull they were interested in was being sold so they could be in on the action. Most of the bulls sold that day, though some exceptional bulls were left for sale to anyone else, private treaty.

After the bulls had all been gone through and the purchases made, the group was treated to a late lunch and visit at the American West Steakhouse in Belle Fourche, SD. The paperwork was completed there and checks written for the bulls.

When asked what gave him the idea, Alan explained, “We wanted to give people that have supported us first chance to buys bulls, so we set a date, then call all past buyers and invite them.” Some customers have been using Kindsfater bulls for 15 years or more, so the Kindsfaters want to make it easy for them to continue.

On sale day, the yearling bulls were in their winter clothes, offered just as they are, no haircuts or primping. All were masculine, well developed bulls, with good feet, plenty of volume, good heads and plenty of muscle.

Kindsfaters have a first breeding season guarantee on the bulls, keep them until May and all the bulls are semen tested in early April.

The yearling heifers are also sold private treaty as commercial heifers. They are grown out nicely, but not overfed. If they don’t sell private treaty, they are sold at the sale barn, and are of the quality to become exceptional cows for whoever purchases them.

When asked what Kindsfater appreciated most about the Angus breed, he said, “Besides just being good, all around cattle, the Angus breed is a frontrunner as far as doing things to promote it, like Certified Angus Beef. They’ve been very progressive in marketing and the Association does a good job getting Angus beef exposed to the public in a good way. That’s been really good for the breed.”

So, what does the future hold for Kindsfater Angus? “God willing, I don’t see a lot of changes as far as numbers or type. We’ll keep trying to raise good, functional cattle that keep people coming back to buy bulls,” says Kindsfater.

So far, that philosophy has kept buyers coming back for more for many years. A solid program that turns out predictable cattle is what’s made them successful and that isn’t going to change.

Near where the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers converge, lies a farm that has been in the Kindsfater family since the 1920’s. Operated today by Alan and Mary Beth Kindsfater, and their family, Katy, David and Adam, its rich soil produces crops and hay that support a registered Angus cowherd and a small commercial feedlot.

After Alan and his brother dissolved their partnership, Alan and his family took the reins of the farm in 1997, running both registered and commercial cows, plus sheep for many of the ensuing years. Focused entirely on the registered Angus herd today, they produce a modest number of exceptional bulls and heifers that are offered to the public private treaty.

The first registered cows were bought in 1986 from Alan’s uncle, Dave Kindsfater. To these cows they added some heifer calves from another breeder, thus putting in place the foundation of their cowherd. No other females have ever been added to the cowherd.

“Those first cows from Uncle Dave were a good fit for us. They did what we expected them to do so we stayed with them,” says Alan.

Trouble-free cattle were his goal and he has maintained that type over the years. In describing his ideal cow, Kindsfater says, “She has to be feminine, be able to maintain her body condition and breed back on time.” He added, “She has to do a good job every year. Our culling program is that they get two shots at an average calf or better, then if she hasn’t done that, she is culled.”

The disposition is very important to Kindsfater. “They have to be easy to handle because we A.I. without synching them, calve them in lots and weigh and tag every calf. We have to be able to work with them.

“We A.I. the cows one cycle then use a good clean-up bull. Late calving cows go to the clean-up bull,” adds Kindsfater.

The Kindsfater cows are calved through sheds in March, then the pairs go to grass in May. The cows are ridden on to heat detect on pasture. They stay on pasture until November, then are brought home to the big lots until calving.

“We wean the bull calves around Oct. 1st, then the heifers the end of October. They are preconditioned before that,” says Kindsfater.

The calves get no creep while on pasture, just good grass and their mother’s milk. They are vaccinated spring and fall and poured for internal and external parasites.

The cows are wintered on straight hay with some protein barrels in the spring after calving. The heifer calves are wintered on hay with limited grain. The bull calves are wintered on ground hay and corn, with a goal weight gain of three pounds per day. All are on a mineral program as well. “A good mineral program has kept things working like they are supposed to,” says Kindsfater.

Kindsfater studies pedigrees and performance on the bulls he uses for A.I. He seeks a moderate birth weight, with an EPD of less than 2.5, and a plus scrotal EPD. “We want good growth but also look at pedigrees that will make good cows,” says Kindsfater. “I do a lot of research on the prospective herd sires to avoid genetic defects. We don’t chase one particular trait either, but want a balanced pedigree. We’ve also avoided fads in the breed.

“About 10 years ago, Jim Willson of Crook Mountain Angus told me I needed to figure out a program, do it and do it well. You do that and you’ll find people who will follow your program. Build your cowherd with the traits that are important to you and it will work. That’s the best advice I ever got. So far, it’s worked.”

The Kindsfaters market their bulls private treaty, but with a little different twist. Past bull customers are invited to the farm on a specific date to bid only against each other for the bulls. A base price is in place for each bull, and a sheet is in hand with all of the pertinent information on the bulls.

The private treaty sale for 2010 was held on Feb. 20th. Leading up to the sale, many had been to the farm to look through the bulls, so had a good idea what they were after. Several simply bid over the phone for their choices, being unable to be there on sale day.

The yearling bulls were in pens of five and were gentle and easy to walk through and study for those last minute decisions. The sale started promptly at 1 p.m. and was over before 1:30. Alan Kindsfater started each bull and asked for bid raises in a slow paced, neighborly fashion. He and daughter Katy called phone bidders when the bull they were interested in was being sold so they could be in on the action. Most of the bulls sold that day, though some exceptional bulls were left for sale to anyone else, private treaty.

After the bulls had all been gone through and the purchases made, the group was treated to a late lunch and visit at the American West Steakhouse in Belle Fourche, SD. The paperwork was completed there and checks written for the bulls.

When asked what gave him the idea, Alan explained, “We wanted to give people that have supported us first chance to buys bulls, so we set a date, then call all past buyers and invite them.” Some customers have been using Kindsfater bulls for 15 years or more, so the Kindsfaters want to make it easy for them to continue.

On sale day, the yearling bulls were in their winter clothes, offered just as they are, no haircuts or primping. All were masculine, well developed bulls, with good feet, plenty of volume, good heads and plenty of muscle.

Kindsfaters have a first breeding season guarantee on the bulls, keep them until May and all the bulls are semen tested in early April.

The yearling heifers are also sold private treaty as commercial heifers. They are grown out nicely, but not overfed. If they don’t sell private treaty, they are sold at the sale barn, and are of the quality to become exceptional cows for whoever purchases them.

When asked what Kindsfater appreciated most about the Angus breed, he said, “Besides just being good, all around cattle, the Angus breed is a frontrunner as far as doing things to promote it, like Certified Angus Beef. They’ve been very progressive in marketing and the Association does a good job getting Angus beef exposed to the public in a good way. That’s been really good for the breed.”

So, what does the future hold for Kindsfater Angus? “God willing, I don’t see a lot of changes as far as numbers or type. We’ll keep trying to raise good, functional cattle that keep people coming back to buy bulls,” says Kindsfater.

So far, that philosophy has kept buyers coming back for more for many years. A solid program that turns out predictable cattle is what’s made them successful and that isn’t going to change.

Near where the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers converge, lies a farm that has been in the Kindsfater family since the 1920’s. Operated today by Alan and Mary Beth Kindsfater, and their family, Katy, David and Adam, its rich soil produces crops and hay that support a registered Angus cowherd and a small commercial feedlot.

After Alan and his brother dissolved their partnership, Alan and his family took the reins of the farm in 1997, running both registered and commercial cows, plus sheep for many of the ensuing years. Focused entirely on the registered Angus herd today, they produce a modest number of exceptional bulls and heifers that are offered to the public private treaty.

The first registered cows were bought in 1986 from Alan’s uncle, Dave Kindsfater. To these cows they added some heifer calves from another breeder, thus putting in place the foundation of their cowherd. No other females have ever been added to the cowherd.

“Those first cows from Uncle Dave were a good fit for us. They did what we expected them to do so we stayed with them,” says Alan.

Trouble-free cattle were his goal and he has maintained that type over the years. In describing his ideal cow, Kindsfater says, “She has to be feminine, be able to maintain her body condition and breed back on time.” He added, “She has to do a good job every year. Our culling program is that they get two shots at an average calf or better, then if she hasn’t done that, she is culled.”

The disposition is very important to Kindsfater. “They have to be easy to handle because we A.I. without synching them, calve them in lots and weigh and tag every calf. We have to be able to work with them.

“We A.I. the cows one cycle then use a good clean-up bull. Late calving cows go to the clean-up bull,” adds Kindsfater.

The Kindsfater cows are calved through sheds in March, then the pairs go to grass in May. The cows are ridden on to heat detect on pasture. They stay on pasture until November, then are brought home to the big lots until calving.

“We wean the bull calves around Oct. 1st, then the heifers the end of October. They are preconditioned before that,” says Kindsfater.

The calves get no creep while on pasture, just good grass and their mother’s milk. They are vaccinated spring and fall and poured for internal and external parasites.

The cows are wintered on straight hay with some protein barrels in the spring after calving. The heifer calves are wintered on hay with limited grain. The bull calves are wintered on ground hay and corn, with a goal weight gain of three pounds per day. All are on a mineral program as well. “A good mineral program has kept things working like they are supposed to,” says Kindsfater.

Kindsfater studies pedigrees and performance on the bulls he uses for A.I. He seeks a moderate birth weight, with an EPD of less than 2.5, and a plus scrotal EPD. “We want good growth but also look at pedigrees that will make good cows,” says Kindsfater. “I do a lot of research on the prospective herd sires to avoid genetic defects. We don’t chase one particular trait either, but want a balanced pedigree. We’ve also avoided fads in the breed.

“About 10 years ago, Jim Willson of Crook Mountain Angus told me I needed to figure out a program, do it and do it well. You do that and you’ll find people who will follow your program. Build your cowherd with the traits that are important to you and it will work. That’s the best advice I ever got. So far, it’s worked.”

The Kindsfaters market their bulls private treaty, but with a little different twist. Past bull customers are invited to the farm on a specific date to bid only against each other for the bulls. A base price is in place for each bull, and a sheet is in hand with all of the pertinent information on the bulls.

The private treaty sale for 2010 was held on Feb. 20th. Leading up to the sale, many had been to the farm to look through the bulls, so had a good idea what they were after. Several simply bid over the phone for their choices, being unable to be there on sale day.

The yearling bulls were in pens of five and were gentle and easy to walk through and study for those last minute decisions. The sale started promptly at 1 p.m. and was over before 1:30. Alan Kindsfater started each bull and asked for bid raises in a slow paced, neighborly fashion. He and daughter Katy called phone bidders when the bull they were interested in was being sold so they could be in on the action. Most of the bulls sold that day, though some exceptional bulls were left for sale to anyone else, private treaty.

After the bulls had all been gone through and the purchases made, the group was treated to a late lunch and visit at the American West Steakhouse in Belle Fourche, SD. The paperwork was completed there and checks written for the bulls.

When asked what gave him the idea, Alan explained, “We wanted to give people that have supported us first chance to buys bulls, so we set a date, then call all past buyers and invite them.” Some customers have been using Kindsfater bulls for 15 years or more, so the Kindsfaters want to make it easy for them to continue.

On sale day, the yearling bulls were in their winter clothes, offered just as they are, no haircuts or primping. All were masculine, well developed bulls, with good feet, plenty of volume, good heads and plenty of muscle.

Kindsfaters have a first breeding season guarantee on the bulls, keep them until May and all the bulls are semen tested in early April.

The yearling heifers are also sold private treaty as commercial heifers. They are grown out nicely, but not overfed. If they don’t sell private treaty, they are sold at the sale barn, and are of the quality to become exceptional cows for whoever purchases them.

When asked what Kindsfater appreciated most about the Angus breed, he said, “Besides just being good, all around cattle, the Angus breed is a frontrunner as far as doing things to promote it, like Certified Angus Beef. They’ve been very progressive in marketing and the Association does a good job getting Angus beef exposed to the public in a good way. That’s been really good for the breed.”

So, what does the future hold for Kindsfater Angus? “God willing, I don’t see a lot of changes as far as numbers or type. We’ll keep trying to raise good, functional cattle that keep people coming back to buy bulls,” says Kindsfater.

So far, that philosophy has kept buyers coming back for more for many years. A solid program that turns out predictable cattle is what’s made them successful and that isn’t going to change.

Near where the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers converge, lies a farm that has been in the Kindsfater family since the 1920’s. Operated today by Alan and Mary Beth Kindsfater, and their family, Katy, David and Adam, its rich soil produces crops and hay that support a registered Angus cowherd and a small commercial feedlot.

After Alan and his brother dissolved their partnership, Alan and his family took the reins of the farm in 1997, running both registered and commercial cows, plus sheep for many of the ensuing years. Focused entirely on the registered Angus herd today, they produce a modest number of exceptional bulls and heifers that are offered to the public private treaty.

The first registered cows were bought in 1986 from Alan’s uncle, Dave Kindsfater. To these cows they added some heifer calves from another breeder, thus putting in place the foundation of their cowherd. No other females have ever been added to the cowherd.

“Those first cows from Uncle Dave were a good fit for us. They did what we expected them to do so we stayed with them,” says Alan.

Trouble-free cattle were his goal and he has maintained that type over the years. In describing his ideal cow, Kindsfater says, “She has to be feminine, be able to maintain her body condition and breed back on time.” He added, “She has to do a good job every year. Our culling program is that they get two shots at an average calf or better, then if she hasn’t done that, she is culled.”

The disposition is very important to Kindsfater. “They have to be easy to handle because we A.I. without synching them, calve them in lots and weigh and tag every calf. We have to be able to work with them.

“We A.I. the cows one cycle then use a good clean-up bull. Late calving cows go to the clean-up bull,” adds Kindsfater.

The Kindsfater cows are calved through sheds in March, then the pairs go to grass in May. The cows are ridden on to heat detect on pasture. They stay on pasture until November, then are brought home to the big lots until calving.

“We wean the bull calves around Oct. 1st, then the heifers the end of October. They are preconditioned before that,” says Kindsfater.

The calves get no creep while on pasture, just good grass and their mother’s milk. They are vaccinated spring and fall and poured for internal and external parasites.

The cows are wintered on straight hay with some protein barrels in the spring after calving. The heifer calves are wintered on hay with limited grain. The bull calves are wintered on ground hay and corn, with a goal weight gain of three pounds per day. All are on a mineral program as well. “A good mineral program has kept things working like they are supposed to,” says Kindsfater.

Kindsfater studies pedigrees and performance on the bulls he uses for A.I. He seeks a moderate birth weight, with an EPD of less than 2.5, and a plus scrotal EPD. “We want good growth but also look at pedigrees that will make good cows,” says Kindsfater. “I do a lot of research on the prospective herd sires to avoid genetic defects. We don’t chase one particular trait either, but want a balanced pedigree. We’ve also avoided fads in the breed.

“About 10 years ago, Jim Willson of Crook Mountain Angus told me I needed to figure out a program, do it and do it well. You do that and you’ll find people who will follow your program. Build your cowherd with the traits that are important to you and it will work. That’s the best advice I ever got. So far, it’s worked.”

The Kindsfaters market their bulls private treaty, but with a little different twist. Past bull customers are invited to the farm on a specific date to bid only against each other for the bulls. A base price is in place for each bull, and a sheet is in hand with all of the pertinent information on the bulls.

The private treaty sale for 2010 was held on Feb. 20th. Leading up to the sale, many had been to the farm to look through the bulls, so had a good idea what they were after. Several simply bid over the phone for their choices, being unable to be there on sale day.

The yearling bulls were in pens of five and were gentle and easy to walk through and study for those last minute decisions. The sale started promptly at 1 p.m. and was over before 1:30. Alan Kindsfater started each bull and asked for bid raises in a slow paced, neighborly fashion. He and daughter Katy called phone bidders when the bull they were interested in was being sold so they could be in on the action. Most of the bulls sold that day, though some exceptional bulls were left for sale to anyone else, private treaty.

After the bulls had all been gone through and the purchases made, the group was treated to a late lunch and visit at the American West Steakhouse in Belle Fourche, SD. The paperwork was completed there and checks written for the bulls.

When asked what gave him the idea, Alan explained, “We wanted to give people that have supported us first chance to buys bulls, so we set a date, then call all past buyers and invite them.” Some customers have been using Kindsfater bulls for 15 years or more, so the Kindsfaters want to make it easy for them to continue.

On sale day, the yearling bulls were in their winter clothes, offered just as they are, no haircuts or primping. All were masculine, well developed bulls, with good feet, plenty of volume, good heads and plenty of muscle.

Kindsfaters have a first breeding season guarantee on the bulls, keep them until May and all the bulls are semen tested in early April.

The yearling heifers are also sold private treaty as commercial heifers. They are grown out nicely, but not overfed. If they don’t sell private treaty, they are sold at the sale barn, and are of the quality to become exceptional cows for whoever purchases them.

When asked what Kindsfater appreciated most about the Angus breed, he said, “Besides just being good, all around cattle, the Angus breed is a frontrunner as far as doing things to promote it, like Certified Angus Beef. They’ve been very progressive in marketing and the Association does a good job getting Angus beef exposed to the public in a good way. That’s been really good for the breed.”

So, what does the future hold for Kindsfater Angus? “God willing, I don’t see a lot of changes as far as numbers or type. We’ll keep trying to raise good, functional cattle that keep people coming back to buy bulls,” says Kindsfater.

So far, that philosophy has kept buyers coming back for more for many years. A solid program that turns out predictable cattle is what’s made them successful and that isn’t going to change.

Near where the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers converge, lies a farm that has been in the Kindsfater family since the 1920’s. Operated today by Alan and Mary Beth Kindsfater, and their family, Katy, David and Adam, its rich soil produces crops and hay that support a registered Angus cowherd and a small commercial feedlot.

After Alan and his brother dissolved their partnership, Alan and his family took the reins of the farm in 1997, running both registered and commercial cows, plus sheep for many of the ensuing years. Focused entirely on the registered Angus herd today, they produce a modest number of exceptional bulls and heifers that are offered to the public private treaty.

The first registered cows were bought in 1986 from Alan’s uncle, Dave Kindsfater. To these cows they added some heifer calves from another breeder, thus putting in place the foundation of their cowherd. No other females have ever been added to the cowherd.

“Those first cows from Uncle Dave were a good fit for us. They did what we expected them to do so we stayed with them,” says Alan.

Trouble-free cattle were his goal and he has maintained that type over the years. In describing his ideal cow, Kindsfater says, “She has to be feminine, be able to maintain her body condition and breed back on time.” He added, “She has to do a good job every year. Our culling program is that they get two shots at an average calf or better, then if she hasn’t done that, she is culled.”

The disposition is very important to Kindsfater. “They have to be easy to handle because we A.I. without synching them, calve them in lots and weigh and tag every calf. We have to be able to work with them.

“We A.I. the cows one cycle then use a good clean-up bull. Late calving cows go to the clean-up bull,” adds Kindsfater.

The Kindsfater cows are calved through sheds in March, then the pairs go to grass in May. The cows are ridden on to heat detect on pasture. They stay on pasture until November, then are brought home to the big lots until calving.

“We wean the bull calves around Oct. 1st, then the heifers the end of October. They are preconditioned before that,” says Kindsfater.

The calves get no creep while on pasture, just good grass and their mother’s milk. They are vaccinated spring and fall and poured for internal and external parasites.

The cows are wintered on straight hay with some protein barrels in the spring after calving. The heifer calves are wintered on hay with limited grain. The bull calves are wintered on ground hay and corn, with a goal weight gain of three pounds per day. All are on a mineral program as well. “A good mineral program has kept things working like they are supposed to,” says Kindsfater.

Kindsfater studies pedigrees and performance on the bulls he uses for A.I. He seeks a moderate birth weight, with an EPD of less than 2.5, and a plus scrotal EPD. “We want good growth but also look at pedigrees that will make good cows,” says Kindsfater. “I do a lot of research on the prospective herd sires to avoid genetic defects. We don’t chase one particular trait either, but want a balanced pedigree. We’ve also avoided fads in the breed.

“About 10 years ago, Jim Willson of Crook Mountain Angus told me I needed to figure out a program, do it and do it well. You do that and you’ll find people who will follow your program. Build your cowherd with the traits that are important to you and it will work. That’s the best advice I ever got. So far, it’s worked.”

The Kindsfaters market their bulls private treaty, but with a little different twist. Past bull customers are invited to the farm on a specific date to bid only against each other for the bulls. A base price is in place for each bull, and a sheet is in hand with all of the pertinent information on the bulls.

The private treaty sale for 2010 was held on Feb. 20th. Leading up to the sale, many had been to the farm to look through the bulls, so had a good idea what they were after. Several simply bid over the phone for their choices, being unable to be there on sale day.

The yearling bulls were in pens of five and were gentle and easy to walk through and study for those last minute decisions. The sale started promptly at 1 p.m. and was over before 1:30. Alan Kindsfater started each bull and asked for bid raises in a slow paced, neighborly fashion. He and daughter Katy called phone bidders when the bull they were interested in was being sold so they could be in on the action. Most of the bulls sold that day, though some exceptional bulls were left for sale to anyone else, private treaty.

After the bulls had all been gone through and the purchases made, the group was treated to a late lunch and visit at the American West Steakhouse in Belle Fourche, SD. The paperwork was completed there and checks written for the bulls.

When asked what gave him the idea, Alan explained, “We wanted to give people that have supported us first chance to buys bulls, so we set a date, then call all past buyers and invite them.” Some customers have been using Kindsfater bulls for 15 years or more, so the Kindsfaters want to make it easy for them to continue.

On sale day, the yearling bulls were in their winter clothes, offered just as they are, no haircuts or primping. All were masculine, well developed bulls, with good feet, plenty of volume, good heads and plenty of muscle.

Kindsfaters have a first breeding season guarantee on the bulls, keep them until May and all the bulls are semen tested in early April.

The yearling heifers are also sold private treaty as commercial heifers. They are grown out nicely, but not overfed. If they don’t sell private treaty, they are sold at the sale barn, and are of the quality to become exceptional cows for whoever purchases them.

When asked what Kindsfater appreciated most about the Angus breed, he said, “Besides just being good, all around cattle, the Angus breed is a frontrunner as far as doing things to promote it, like Certified Angus Beef. They’ve been very progressive in marketing and the Association does a good job getting Angus beef exposed to the public in a good way. That’s been really good for the breed.”

So, what does the future hold for Kindsfater Angus? “God willing, I don’t see a lot of changes as far as numbers or type. We’ll keep trying to raise good, functional cattle that keep people coming back to buy bulls,” says Kindsfater.

So far, that philosophy has kept buyers coming back for more for many years. A solid program that turns out predictable cattle is what’s made them successful and that isn’t going to change.

Near where the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers converge, lies a farm that has been in the Kindsfater family since the 1920’s. Operated today by Alan and Mary Beth Kindsfater, and their family, Katy, David and Adam, its rich soil produces crops and hay that support a registered Angus cowherd and a small commercial feedlot.

After Alan and his brother dissolved their partnership, Alan and his family took the reins of the farm in 1997, running both registered and commercial cows, plus sheep for many of the ensuing years. Focused entirely on the registered Angus herd today, they produce a modest number of exceptional bulls and heifers that are offered to the public private treaty.

The first registered cows were bought in 1986 from Alan’s uncle, Dave Kindsfater. To these cows they added some heifer calves from another breeder, thus putting in place the foundation of their cowherd. No other females have ever been added to the cowherd.

“Those first cows from Uncle Dave were a good fit for us. They did what we expected them to do so we stayed with them,” says Alan.

Trouble-free cattle were his goal and he has maintained that type over the years. In describing his ideal cow, Kindsfater says, “She has to be feminine, be able to maintain her body condition and breed back on time.” He added, “She has to do a good job every year. Our culling program is that they get two shots at an average calf or better, then if she hasn’t done that, she is culled.”

The disposition is very important to Kindsfater. “They have to be easy to handle because we A.I. without synching them, calve them in lots and weigh and tag every calf. We have to be able to work with them.

“We A.I. the cows one cycle then use a good clean-up bull. Late calving cows go to the clean-up bull,” adds Kindsfater.

The Kindsfater cows are calved through sheds in March, then the pairs go to grass in May. The cows are ridden on to heat detect on pasture. They stay on pasture until November, then are brought home to the big lots until calving.

“We wean the bull calves around Oct. 1st, then the heifers the end of October. They are preconditioned before that,” says Kindsfater.

The calves get no creep while on pasture, just good grass and their mother’s milk. They are vaccinated spring and fall and poured for internal and external parasites.

The cows are wintered on straight hay with some protein barrels in the spring after calving. The heifer calves are wintered on hay with limited grain. The bull calves are wintered on ground hay and corn, with a goal weight gain of three pounds per day. All are on a mineral program as well. “A good mineral program has kept things working like they are supposed to,” says Kindsfater.

Kindsfater studies pedigrees and performance on the bulls he uses for A.I. He seeks a moderate birth weight, with an EPD of less than 2.5, and a plus scrotal EPD. “We want good growth but also look at pedigrees that will make good cows,” says Kindsfater. “I do a lot of research on the prospective herd sires to avoid genetic defects. We don’t chase one particular trait either, but want a balanced pedigree. We’ve also avoided fads in the breed.

“About 10 years ago, Jim Willson of Crook Mountain Angus told me I needed to figure out a program, do it and do it well. You do that and you’ll find people who will follow your program. Build your cowherd with the traits that are important to you and it will work. That’s the best advice I ever got. So far, it’s worked.”

The Kindsfaters market their bulls private treaty, but with a little different twist. Past bull customers are invited to the farm on a specific date to bid only against each other for the bulls. A base price is in place for each bull, and a sheet is in hand with all of the pertinent information on the bulls.

The private treaty sale for 2010 was held on Feb. 20th. Leading up to the sale, many had been to the farm to look through the bulls, so had a good idea what they were after. Several simply bid over the phone for their choices, being unable to be there on sale day.

The yearling bulls were in pens of five and were gentle and easy to walk through and study for those last minute decisions. The sale started promptly at 1 p.m. and was over before 1:30. Alan Kindsfater started each bull and asked for bid raises in a slow paced, neighborly fashion. He and daughter Katy called phone bidders when the bull they were interested in was being sold so they could be in on the action. Most of the bulls sold that day, though some exceptional bulls were left for sale to anyone else, private treaty.

After the bulls had all been gone through and the purchases made, the group was treated to a late lunch and visit at the American West Steakhouse in Belle Fourche, SD. The paperwork was completed there and checks written for the bulls.

When asked what gave him the idea, Alan explained, “We wanted to give people that have supported us first chance to buys bulls, so we set a date, then call all past buyers and invite them.” Some customers have been using Kindsfater bulls for 15 years or more, so the Kindsfaters want to make it easy for them to continue.

On sale day, the yearling bulls were in their winter clothes, offered just as they are, no haircuts or primping. All were masculine, well developed bulls, with good feet, plenty of volume, good heads and plenty of muscle.

Kindsfaters have a first breeding season guarantee on the bulls, keep them until May and all the bulls are semen tested in early April.

The yearling heifers are also sold private treaty as commercial heifers. They are grown out nicely, but not overfed. If they don’t sell private treaty, they are sold at the sale barn, and are of the quality to become exceptional cows for whoever purchases them.

When asked what Kindsfater appreciated most about the Angus breed, he said, “Besides just being good, all around cattle, the Angus breed is a frontrunner as far as doing things to promote it, like Certified Angus Beef. They’ve been very progressive in marketing and the Association does a good job getting Angus beef exposed to the public in a good way. That’s been really good for the breed.”

So, what does the future hold for Kindsfater Angus? “God willing, I don’t see a lot of changes as far as numbers or type. We’ll keep trying to raise good, functional cattle that keep people coming back to buy bulls,” says Kindsfater.

So far, that philosophy has kept buyers coming back for more for many years. A solid program that turns out predictable cattle is what’s made them successful and that isn’t going to change.

Near where the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers converge, lies a farm that has been in the Kindsfater family since the 1920’s. Operated today by Alan and Mary Beth Kindsfater, and their family, Katy, David and Adam, its rich soil produces crops and hay that support a registered Angus cowherd and a small commercial feedlot.

After Alan and his brother dissolved their partnership, Alan and his family took the reins of the farm in 1997, running both registered and commercial cows, plus sheep for many of the ensuing years. Focused entirely on the registered Angus herd today, they produce a modest number of exceptional bulls and heifers that are offered to the public private treaty.

The first registered cows were bought in 1986 from Alan’s uncle, Dave Kindsfater. To these cows they added some heifer calves from another breeder, thus putting in place the foundation of their cowherd. No other females have ever been added to the cowherd.

“Those first cows from Uncle Dave were a good fit for us. They did what we expected them to do so we stayed with them,” says Alan.

Trouble-free cattle were his goal and he has maintained that type over the years. In describing his ideal cow, Kindsfater says, “She has to be feminine, be able to maintain her body condition and breed back on time.” He added, “She has to do a good job every year. Our culling program is that they get two shots at an average calf or better, then if she hasn’t done that, she is culled.”

The disposition is very important to Kindsfater. “They have to be easy to handle because we A.I. without synching them, calve them in lots and weigh and tag every calf. We have to be able to work with them.

“We A.I. the cows one cycle then use a good clean-up bull. Late calving cows go to the clean-up bull,” adds Kindsfater.

The Kindsfater cows are calved through sheds in March, then the pairs go to grass in May. The cows are ridden on to heat detect on pasture. They stay on pasture until November, then are brought home to the big lots until calving.

“We wean the bull calves around Oct. 1st, then the heifers the end of October. They are preconditioned before that,” says Kindsfater.

The calves get no creep while on pasture, just good grass and their mother’s milk. They are vaccinated spring and fall and poured for internal and external parasites.

The cows are wintered on straight hay with some protein barrels in the spring after calving. The heifer calves are wintered on hay with limited grain. The bull calves are wintered on ground hay and corn, with a goal weight gain of three pounds per day. All are on a mineral program as well. “A good mineral program has kept things working like they are supposed to,” says Kindsfater.

Kindsfater studies pedigrees and performance on the bulls he uses for A.I. He seeks a moderate birth weight, with an EPD of less than 2.5, and a plus scrotal EPD. “We want good growth but also look at pedigrees that will make good cows,” says Kindsfater. “I do a lot of research on the prospective herd sires to avoid genetic defects. We don’t chase one particular trait either, but want a balanced pedigree. We’ve also avoided fads in the breed.

“About 10 years ago, Jim Willson of Crook Mountain Angus told me I needed to figure out a program, do it and do it well. You do that and you’ll find people who will follow your program. Build your cowherd with the traits that are important to you and it will work. That’s the best advice I ever got. So far, it’s worked.”

The Kindsfaters market their bulls private treaty, but with a little different twist. Past bull customers are invited to the farm on a specific date to bid only against each other for the bulls. A base price is in place for each bull, and a sheet is in hand with all of the pertinent information on the bulls.

The private treaty sale for 2010 was held on Feb. 20th. Leading up to the sale, many had been to the farm to look through the bulls, so had a good idea what they were after. Several simply bid over the phone for their choices, being unable to be there on sale day.

The yearling bulls were in pens of five and were gentle and easy to walk through and study for those last minute decisions. The sale started promptly at 1 p.m. and was over before 1:30. Alan Kindsfater started each bull and asked for bid raises in a slow paced, neighborly fashion. He and daughter Katy called phone bidders when the bull they were interested in was being sold so they could be in on the action. Most of the bulls sold that day, though some exceptional bulls were left for sale to anyone else, private treaty.

After the bulls had all been gone through and the purchases made, the group was treated to a late lunch and visit at the American West Steakhouse in Belle Fourche, SD. The paperwork was completed there and checks written for the bulls.

When asked what gave him the idea, Alan explained, “We wanted to give people that have supported us first chance to buys bulls, so we set a date, then call all past buyers and invite them.” Some customers have been using Kindsfater bulls for 15 years or more, so the Kindsfaters want to make it easy for them to continue.

On sale day, the yearling bulls were in their winter clothes, offered just as they are, no haircuts or primping. All were masculine, well developed bulls, with good feet, plenty of volume, good heads and plenty of muscle.

Kindsfaters have a first breeding season guarantee on the bulls, keep them until May and all the bulls are semen tested in early April.

The yearling heifers are also sold private treaty as commercial heifers. They are grown out nicely, but not overfed. If they don’t sell private treaty, they are sold at the sale barn, and are of the quality to become exceptional cows for whoever purchases them.

When asked what Kindsfater appreciated most about the Angus breed, he said, “Besides just being good, all around cattle, the Angus breed is a frontrunner as far as doing things to promote it, like Certified Angus Beef. They’ve been very progressive in marketing and the Association does a good job getting Angus beef exposed to the public in a good way. That’s been really good for the breed.”

So, what does the future hold for Kindsfater Angus? “God willing, I don’t see a lot of changes as far as numbers or type. We’ll keep trying to raise good, functional cattle that keep people coming back to buy bulls,” says Kindsfater.

So far, that philosophy has kept buyers coming back for more for many years. A solid program that turns out predictable cattle is what’s made them successful and that isn’t going to change.


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