Last American cowboy | TSLN.com

Last American cowboy

Alaina Mousel

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.

The American Cowboy is a dying breed, at least according to Animal Planet’s newest original television series “Last American Cowboy,” that premiered June 7, 2010. The show details life on three family-owned and operated working cattle ranches as they battle calving season, Mother Nature, disease, predators and wildfires.

From March through November a two-man film crew filmed day-to-day activities at each ranch: Galt Ranch, White Sulphur Springs, MT; Hughes Mountain Ranch, Stanton, MT; and Stucky Ranch, Avon, MT.

“They covered everything from calving, branding and irrigating – everything that had to be done,” Glenna Stucky said, explaining they didn’t have any trouble working alongside the film crew.

Glenna along with her husband, Earl Stucky, are traditional ranchers that do most of their work by hand and opt for horseback rather than ATVs. Keeping these traditions alive is important to the Stuckys and their three-generation ranching family. Together they operate approximately 20,000 acres and 1,200-head of cattle.

Galt Ranch, one of the largest in Montana with more than 3,500 cattle, 100 horses and 100,000 acres, is so vast Bill Galt manages it from the sky in his helicopter. The helicopter helps Bill keep an eye on his land and cattle, hunt predators and move elk herds that devour his cattle’s food supply. He believes technology is the future of ranching and necessary to run a ranch of this size.

Scott and Stacey Hughes, a young couple with a three-year-old son and nine-year-old daughter, manage Hughes Ranches. With approximately 12,000 acres and 400 Angus cattle, it’s plenty for a young family to tackle alone. The operation is owned by Scott’s father, Tucker, who is a local politician and keeps a close eye on Scott. Regardless at the end of each day Scott and Stacey make time for their children whom they hope will one day run the ranch.


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