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Livestock production in China

Steve Paisley
Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, University of Wyoming
Steve Paisley |
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I recently returned from a two week visit to China as a part of a research team funded by USDA and China’s Department of Agriculture with the goal of establishing research connections between the two countries. In addition to lectures and meetings at Agricultural Universities, we were able to get a small glimpse of their beef and sheep industry in Northern China. While I’m no international agriculture expert, even a novice can recognize that the Chinese society is rapidly changing, and Chinese agriculture is rapidly adapting as well.

Flying into Beijing, you immediately notice the amazing changes taking place. Modern airports, roads and skyscrapers are immediately adjacent to traditional small farms and underdeveloped rural communities. On city streets, new BMW’s and Audi’s share the road with literally millions of pedal carts and bicycles. According to most estimates, China’s economy is growing 10 to 13 percent each year, with apparently minimal impact from the slowing global economy.

I recently returned from a two week visit to China as a part of a research team funded by USDA and China’s Department of Agriculture with the goal of establishing research connections between the two countries. In addition to lectures and meetings at Agricultural Universities, we were able to get a small glimpse of their beef and sheep industry in Northern China. While I’m no international agriculture expert, even a novice can recognize that the Chinese society is rapidly changing, and Chinese agriculture is rapidly adapting as well.

Flying into Beijing, you immediately notice the amazing changes taking place. Modern airports, roads and skyscrapers are immediately adjacent to traditional small farms and underdeveloped rural communities. On city streets, new BMW’s and Audi’s share the road with literally millions of pedal carts and bicycles. According to most estimates, China’s economy is growing 10 to 13 percent each year, with apparently minimal impact from the slowing global economy.

I recently returned from a two week visit to China as a part of a research team funded by USDA and China’s Department of Agriculture with the goal of establishing research connections between the two countries. In addition to lectures and meetings at Agricultural Universities, we were able to get a small glimpse of their beef and sheep industry in Northern China. While I’m no international agriculture expert, even a novice can recognize that the Chinese society is rapidly changing, and Chinese agriculture is rapidly adapting as well.

Flying into Beijing, you immediately notice the amazing changes taking place. Modern airports, roads and skyscrapers are immediately adjacent to traditional small farms and underdeveloped rural communities. On city streets, new BMW’s and Audi’s share the road with literally millions of pedal carts and bicycles. According to most estimates, China’s economy is growing 10 to 13 percent each year, with apparently minimal impact from the slowing global economy.

I recently returned from a two week visit to China as a part of a research team funded by USDA and China’s Department of Agriculture with the goal of establishing research connections between the two countries. In addition to lectures and meetings at Agricultural Universities, we were able to get a small glimpse of their beef and sheep industry in Northern China. While I’m no international agriculture expert, even a novice can recognize that the Chinese society is rapidly changing, and Chinese agriculture is rapidly adapting as well.

Flying into Beijing, you immediately notice the amazing changes taking place. Modern airports, roads and skyscrapers are immediately adjacent to traditional small farms and underdeveloped rural communities. On city streets, new BMW’s and Audi’s share the road with literally millions of pedal carts and bicycles. According to most estimates, China’s economy is growing 10 to 13 percent each year, with apparently minimal impact from the slowing global economy.

I recently returned from a two week visit to China as a part of a research team funded by USDA and China’s Department of Agriculture with the goal of establishing research connections between the two countries. In addition to lectures and meetings at Agricultural Universities, we were able to get a small glimpse of their beef and sheep industry in Northern China. While I’m no international agriculture expert, even a novice can recognize that the Chinese society is rapidly changing, and Chinese agriculture is rapidly adapting as well.

Flying into Beijing, you immediately notice the amazing changes taking place. Modern airports, roads and skyscrapers are immediately adjacent to traditional small farms and underdeveloped rural communities. On city streets, new BMW’s and Audi’s share the road with literally millions of pedal carts and bicycles. According to most estimates, China’s economy is growing 10 to 13 percent each year, with apparently minimal impact from the slowing global economy.


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