Local athletes cash in on Cowboy Christmas | TSLN.com

Local athletes cash in on Cowboy Christmas

Starla Lyon

TSLN photo by Aaron NelsonDustin Luper of Black Hawk, SD scores a 74 on this ride from the Black Hills Roundup in Belle Fourche, SD, July 3.

To most Americans the July 4th celebration signifies Old Glory, fireworks, family picnics and parades. A feeling of patriotism leads us to stand up at the sight of the American Flag and pay homage to those who have fought for our freedom. One would be hard pressed to find a group of people more patriotic or respectful of this country than the American cowboy and cowgirl. The sport of rodeo embodies these beliefs in every way.

Anyone who has ever attended a rodeo, no matter what the time of year, has had goose bumps or a lump in their throat when the American Flag goes by carried by a rider on a swift horse as the National Anthem plays. It has also been said that anyone who does not know that it’s only proper to stand up and remove one’s hat at that beautiful sight will be guaranteed a quick lesson in honor and tradition.

As always, the Fourth of July Cowboy Christmas rodeo frenzy and competition was hot this year. Rodeos from Canada to California and everywhere in between were on the itinerary of every PRCA competitor chasing their dreams. Among the cream of the crop were local cowboys and cowgirls who, despite the cost of fuel and a few hardships along the way, have continued to persevere and blaze their way to the top.

Belle Fourche native Brian Curtis came back from a painful elbow injury to win the bull riding at this year’s Black Hills Roundup aboard D&H Cattle Co.’s Crash Cart.

“I was happy with my win in Belle Fourche,” said the champ. “I’ve been going to some Circuit rodeos and plan to keep going. I tore some ligaments in my riding thumb but I plan to keep going hard and keep that thumb taped up well.”

Curtis said the thumb injury will likely require surgery down the road but in the spirit of tough cowboys, he doesn’t plan to let the injury slow him down.

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Traveling with Curtis is fellow bull rider Ty Odd of Miller, SD.

To most Americans the July 4th celebration signifies Old Glory, fireworks, family picnics and parades. A feeling of patriotism leads us to stand up at the sight of the American Flag and pay homage to those who have fought for our freedom. One would be hard pressed to find a group of people more patriotic or respectful of this country than the American cowboy and cowgirl. The sport of rodeo embodies these beliefs in every way.

Anyone who has ever attended a rodeo, no matter what the time of year, has had goose bumps or a lump in their throat when the American Flag goes by carried by a rider on a swift horse as the National Anthem plays. It has also been said that anyone who does not know that it’s only proper to stand up and remove one’s hat at that beautiful sight will be guaranteed a quick lesson in honor and tradition.

As always, the Fourth of July Cowboy Christmas rodeo frenzy and competition was hot this year. Rodeos from Canada to California and everywhere in between were on the itinerary of every PRCA competitor chasing their dreams. Among the cream of the crop were local cowboys and cowgirls who, despite the cost of fuel and a few hardships along the way, have continued to persevere and blaze their way to the top.

Belle Fourche native Brian Curtis came back from a painful elbow injury to win the bull riding at this year’s Black Hills Roundup aboard D&H Cattle Co.’s Crash Cart.

“I was happy with my win in Belle Fourche,” said the champ. “I’ve been going to some Circuit rodeos and plan to keep going. I tore some ligaments in my riding thumb but I plan to keep going hard and keep that thumb taped up well.”

Curtis said the thumb injury will likely require surgery down the road but in the spirit of tough cowboys, he doesn’t plan to let the injury slow him down.

Traveling with Curtis is fellow bull rider Ty Odd of Miller, SD.

To most Americans the July 4th celebration signifies Old Glory, fireworks, family picnics and parades. A feeling of patriotism leads us to stand up at the sight of the American Flag and pay homage to those who have fought for our freedom. One would be hard pressed to find a group of people more patriotic or respectful of this country than the American cowboy and cowgirl. The sport of rodeo embodies these beliefs in every way.

Anyone who has ever attended a rodeo, no matter what the time of year, has had goose bumps or a lump in their throat when the American Flag goes by carried by a rider on a swift horse as the National Anthem plays. It has also been said that anyone who does not know that it’s only proper to stand up and remove one’s hat at that beautiful sight will be guaranteed a quick lesson in honor and tradition.

As always, the Fourth of July Cowboy Christmas rodeo frenzy and competition was hot this year. Rodeos from Canada to California and everywhere in between were on the itinerary of every PRCA competitor chasing their dreams. Among the cream of the crop were local cowboys and cowgirls who, despite the cost of fuel and a few hardships along the way, have continued to persevere and blaze their way to the top.

Belle Fourche native Brian Curtis came back from a painful elbow injury to win the bull riding at this year’s Black Hills Roundup aboard D&H Cattle Co.’s Crash Cart.

“I was happy with my win in Belle Fourche,” said the champ. “I’ve been going to some Circuit rodeos and plan to keep going. I tore some ligaments in my riding thumb but I plan to keep going hard and keep that thumb taped up well.”

Curtis said the thumb injury will likely require surgery down the road but in the spirit of tough cowboys, he doesn’t plan to let the injury slow him down.

Traveling with Curtis is fellow bull rider Ty Odd of Miller, SD.