Lowline offers versatility, moderation to cattle operations | TSLN.com

Lowline offers versatility, moderation to cattle operations

Photo by Gayle SmithGeorge with his older Lowline cows.

Moderate frame cows. Everything we read today says the cow-calf producer needs to reduce cow size to maintain profitability. But how can the cow-calf producer afford to change his entire cow herd to accomplish this and where do you go to find smaller frame cows?

Six years ago, North Platte, NE rancher George Jenkins started researching a breed that was barely heard of in the United States. Jenkins was looking for the impossible – a smaller breed of cattle he could raise on his smaller acreage that would still perform well for a commercial producer.

Jenkins had spent years buying commercial cows that he felt weren’t very profitable. He knew there had to be a more profitable and efficient cow, so he started reading about smaller breeds on the internet. However, most of them were for pets or a hobby farm, which didn’t interest him. Then he came across the Lowline.

“What really intrigued me about this breed is that it is actually the old Aberdeen Angus breed that was preserved by the Australians,” said Jenkins. “They are similar to the cattle my dad raised and the cattle I showed in 4-H. They are smaller Angus cattle.

“Lowline are the only purebred cattle left in the world,” he adds. “There is no other breed that can say they are 100 percent of what they are, because they have nothing to back it up.”

Moderate frame cows. Everything we read today says the cow-calf producer needs to reduce cow size to maintain profitability. But how can the cow-calf producer afford to change his entire cow herd to accomplish this and where do you go to find smaller frame cows?

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Six years ago, North Platte, NE rancher George Jenkins started researching a breed that was barely heard of in the United States. Jenkins was looking for the impossible – a smaller breed of cattle he could raise on his smaller acreage that would still perform well for a commercial producer.

Jenkins had spent years buying commercial cows that he felt weren’t very profitable. He knew there had to be a more profitable and efficient cow, so he started reading about smaller breeds on the internet. However, most of them were for pets or a hobby farm, which didn’t interest him. Then he came across the Lowline.

“What really intrigued me about this breed is that it is actually the old Aberdeen Angus breed that was preserved by the Australians,” said Jenkins. “They are similar to the cattle my dad raised and the cattle I showed in 4-H. They are smaller Angus cattle.

“Lowline are the only purebred cattle left in the world,” he adds. “There is no other breed that can say they are 100 percent of what they are, because they have nothing to back it up.”

Moderate frame cows. Everything we read today says the cow-calf producer needs to reduce cow size to maintain profitability. But how can the cow-calf producer afford to change his entire cow herd to accomplish this and where do you go to find smaller frame cows?

Six years ago, North Platte, NE rancher George Jenkins started researching a breed that was barely heard of in the United States. Jenkins was looking for the impossible – a smaller breed of cattle he could raise on his smaller acreage that would still perform well for a commercial producer.

Jenkins had spent years buying commercial cows that he felt weren’t very profitable. He knew there had to be a more profitable and efficient cow, so he started reading about smaller breeds on the internet. However, most of them were for pets or a hobby farm, which didn’t interest him. Then he came across the Lowline.

“What really intrigued me about this breed is that it is actually the old Aberdeen Angus breed that was preserved by the Australians,” said Jenkins. “They are similar to the cattle my dad raised and the cattle I showed in 4-H. They are smaller Angus cattle.

“Lowline are the only purebred cattle left in the world,” he adds. “There is no other breed that can say they are 100 percent of what they are, because they have nothing to back it up.”

Moderate frame cows. Everything we read today says the cow-calf producer needs to reduce cow size to maintain profitability. But how can the cow-calf producer afford to change his entire cow herd to accomplish this and where do you go to find smaller frame cows?

Six years ago, North Platte, NE rancher George Jenkins started researching a breed that was barely heard of in the United States. Jenkins was looking for the impossible – a smaller breed of cattle he could raise on his smaller acreage that would still perform well for a commercial producer.

Jenkins had spent years buying commercial cows that he felt weren’t very profitable. He knew there had to be a more profitable and efficient cow, so he started reading about smaller breeds on the internet. However, most of them were for pets or a hobby farm, which didn’t interest him. Then he came across the Lowline.

“What really intrigued me about this breed is that it is actually the old Aberdeen Angus breed that was preserved by the Australians,” said Jenkins. “They are similar to the cattle my dad raised and the cattle I showed in 4-H. They are smaller Angus cattle.

“Lowline are the only purebred cattle left in the world,” he adds. “There is no other breed that can say they are 100 percent of what they are, because they have nothing to back it up.”

Moderate frame cows. Everything we read today says the cow-calf producer needs to reduce cow size to maintain profitability. But how can the cow-calf producer afford to change his entire cow herd to accomplish this and where do you go to find smaller frame cows?

Six years ago, North Platte, NE rancher George Jenkins started researching a breed that was barely heard of in the United States. Jenkins was looking for the impossible – a smaller breed of cattle he could raise on his smaller acreage that would still perform well for a commercial producer.

Jenkins had spent years buying commercial cows that he felt weren’t very profitable. He knew there had to be a more profitable and efficient cow, so he started reading about smaller breeds on the internet. However, most of them were for pets or a hobby farm, which didn’t interest him. Then he came across the Lowline.

“What really intrigued me about this breed is that it is actually the old Aberdeen Angus breed that was preserved by the Australians,” said Jenkins. “They are similar to the cattle my dad raised and the cattle I showed in 4-H. They are smaller Angus cattle.

“Lowline are the only purebred cattle left in the world,” he adds. “There is no other breed that can say they are 100 percent of what they are, because they have nothing to back it up.”

Moderate frame cows. Everything we read today says the cow-calf producer needs to reduce cow size to maintain profitability. But how can the cow-calf producer afford to change his entire cow herd to accomplish this and where do you go to find smaller frame cows?

Six years ago, North Platte, NE rancher George Jenkins started researching a breed that was barely heard of in the United States. Jenkins was looking for the impossible – a smaller breed of cattle he could raise on his smaller acreage that would still perform well for a commercial producer.

Jenkins had spent years buying commercial cows that he felt weren’t very profitable. He knew there had to be a more profitable and efficient cow, so he started reading about smaller breeds on the internet. However, most of them were for pets or a hobby farm, which didn’t interest him. Then he came across the Lowline.

“What really intrigued me about this breed is that it is actually the old Aberdeen Angus breed that was preserved by the Australians,” said Jenkins. “They are similar to the cattle my dad raised and the cattle I showed in 4-H. They are smaller Angus cattle.

“Lowline are the only purebred cattle left in the world,” he adds. “There is no other breed that can say they are 100 percent of what they are, because they have nothing to back it up.”

Moderate frame cows. Everything we read today says the cow-calf producer needs to reduce cow size to maintain profitability. But how can the cow-calf producer afford to change his entire cow herd to accomplish this and where do you go to find smaller frame cows?

Six years ago, North Platte, NE rancher George Jenkins started researching a breed that was barely heard of in the United States. Jenkins was looking for the impossible – a smaller breed of cattle he could raise on his smaller acreage that would still perform well for a commercial producer.

Jenkins had spent years buying commercial cows that he felt weren’t very profitable. He knew there had to be a more profitable and efficient cow, so he started reading about smaller breeds on the internet. However, most of them were for pets or a hobby farm, which didn’t interest him. Then he came across the Lowline.

“What really intrigued me about this breed is that it is actually the old Aberdeen Angus breed that was preserved by the Australians,” said Jenkins. “They are similar to the cattle my dad raised and the cattle I showed in 4-H. They are smaller Angus cattle.

“Lowline are the only purebred cattle left in the world,” he adds. “There is no other breed that can say they are 100 percent of what they are, because they have nothing to back it up.”

Moderate frame cows. Everything we read today says the cow-calf producer needs to reduce cow size to maintain profitability. But how can the cow-calf producer afford to change his entire cow herd to accomplish this and where do you go to find smaller frame cows?

Six years ago, North Platte, NE rancher George Jenkins started researching a breed that was barely heard of in the United States. Jenkins was looking for the impossible – a smaller breed of cattle he could raise on his smaller acreage that would still perform well for a commercial producer.

Jenkins had spent years buying commercial cows that he felt weren’t very profitable. He knew there had to be a more profitable and efficient cow, so he started reading about smaller breeds on the internet. However, most of them were for pets or a hobby farm, which didn’t interest him. Then he came across the Lowline.

“What really intrigued me about this breed is that it is actually the old Aberdeen Angus breed that was preserved by the Australians,” said Jenkins. “They are similar to the cattle my dad raised and the cattle I showed in 4-H. They are smaller Angus cattle.

“Lowline are the only purebred cattle left in the world,” he adds. “There is no other breed that can say they are 100 percent of what they are, because they have nothing to back it up.”