Maintaining post-weaning animal health | TSLN.com

Maintaining post-weaning animal health

Amanda Nolz

This week showed the first hint of winter for many across the Northern Plains as the first snowfall hit the ground. With winter’s icy grip just around the corner, ranchers are busy preparing for the harsh, adverse weather that the season is notorious for. A primary concern for cattlemen is maintaining animal health during the cold winter months. For the majority of ranchers, the calves have been weaned and have filled the feedyard, creating a load of chores and worries.

So what are the proactive steps cattlemen should take to maintain optimal animal health in their feeder calves, post-weaning? For Terry Hendrix, DMV, of Artesian Veterinary Clinic in Artesian, SD, it begins and ends with the mama cow.

“If you want a healthy calf after weaning, you have got to think about the pregnant cow planning to calve this spring,” said Hendrix. “The first 12 hours of a calf’s life will determine their overall health and performance throughout their entire life. I can’t stress that enough.”

While Hendrix has plenty of advice in order to avoid sick calves in the feedlot, he strongly urges cattlemen to think about the mama cow to avoid health problems in the upcoming year. Cattlemen shouldn’t try to reduce input costs by ignoring the needs of the cowherd, and Hendrix warns that this practice will cost cattlemen in the end.

The following are Hendrix’ top five tips for taking care of the cow and raising a healthy calf.

This week showed the first hint of winter for many across the Northern Plains as the first snowfall hit the ground. With winter’s icy grip just around the corner, ranchers are busy preparing for the harsh, adverse weather that the season is notorious for. A primary concern for cattlemen is maintaining animal health during the cold winter months. For the majority of ranchers, the calves have been weaned and have filled the feedyard, creating a load of chores and worries.

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So what are the proactive steps cattlemen should take to maintain optimal animal health in their feeder calves, post-weaning? For Terry Hendrix, DMV, of Artesian Veterinary Clinic in Artesian, SD, it begins and ends with the mama cow.

“If you want a healthy calf after weaning, you have got to think about the pregnant cow planning to calve this spring,” said Hendrix. “The first 12 hours of a calf’s life will determine their overall health and performance throughout their entire life. I can’t stress that enough.”

While Hendrix has plenty of advice in order to avoid sick calves in the feedlot, he strongly urges cattlemen to think about the mama cow to avoid health problems in the upcoming year. Cattlemen shouldn’t try to reduce input costs by ignoring the needs of the cowherd, and Hendrix warns that this practice will cost cattlemen in the end.

The following are Hendrix’ top five tips for taking care of the cow and raising a healthy calf.

This week showed the first hint of winter for many across the Northern Plains as the first snowfall hit the ground. With winter’s icy grip just around the corner, ranchers are busy preparing for the harsh, adverse weather that the season is notorious for. A primary concern for cattlemen is maintaining animal health during the cold winter months. For the majority of ranchers, the calves have been weaned and have filled the feedyard, creating a load of chores and worries.

So what are the proactive steps cattlemen should take to maintain optimal animal health in their feeder calves, post-weaning? For Terry Hendrix, DMV, of Artesian Veterinary Clinic in Artesian, SD, it begins and ends with the mama cow.

“If you want a healthy calf after weaning, you have got to think about the pregnant cow planning to calve this spring,” said Hendrix. “The first 12 hours of a calf’s life will determine their overall health and performance throughout their entire life. I can’t stress that enough.”

While Hendrix has plenty of advice in order to avoid sick calves in the feedlot, he strongly urges cattlemen to think about the mama cow to avoid health problems in the upcoming year. Cattlemen shouldn’t try to reduce input costs by ignoring the needs of the cowherd, and Hendrix warns that this practice will cost cattlemen in the end.

The following are Hendrix’ top five tips for taking care of the cow and raising a healthy calf.

This week showed the first hint of winter for many across the Northern Plains as the first snowfall hit the ground. With winter’s icy grip just around the corner, ranchers are busy preparing for the harsh, adverse weather that the season is notorious for. A primary concern for cattlemen is maintaining animal health during the cold winter months. For the majority of ranchers, the calves have been weaned and have filled the feedyard, creating a load of chores and worries.

So what are the proactive steps cattlemen should take to maintain optimal animal health in their feeder calves, post-weaning? For Terry Hendrix, DMV, of Artesian Veterinary Clinic in Artesian, SD, it begins and ends with the mama cow.

“If you want a healthy calf after weaning, you have got to think about the pregnant cow planning to calve this spring,” said Hendrix. “The first 12 hours of a calf’s life will determine their overall health and performance throughout their entire life. I can’t stress that enough.”

While Hendrix has plenty of advice in order to avoid sick calves in the feedlot, he strongly urges cattlemen to think about the mama cow to avoid health problems in the upcoming year. Cattlemen shouldn’t try to reduce input costs by ignoring the needs of the cowherd, and Hendrix warns that this practice will cost cattlemen in the end.

The following are Hendrix’ top five tips for taking care of the cow and raising a healthy calf.

This week showed the first hint of winter for many across the Northern Plains as the first snowfall hit the ground. With winter’s icy grip just around the corner, ranchers are busy preparing for the harsh, adverse weather that the season is notorious for. A primary concern for cattlemen is maintaining animal health during the cold winter months. For the majority of ranchers, the calves have been weaned and have filled the feedyard, creating a load of chores and worries.

So what are the proactive steps cattlemen should take to maintain optimal animal health in their feeder calves, post-weaning? For Terry Hendrix, DMV, of Artesian Veterinary Clinic in Artesian, SD, it begins and ends with the mama cow.

“If you want a healthy calf after weaning, you have got to think about the pregnant cow planning to calve this spring,” said Hendrix. “The first 12 hours of a calf’s life will determine their overall health and performance throughout their entire life. I can’t stress that enough.”

While Hendrix has plenty of advice in order to avoid sick calves in the feedlot, he strongly urges cattlemen to think about the mama cow to avoid health problems in the upcoming year. Cattlemen shouldn’t try to reduce input costs by ignoring the needs of the cowherd, and Hendrix warns that this practice will cost cattlemen in the end.

The following are Hendrix’ top five tips for taking care of the cow and raising a healthy calf.

This week showed the first hint of winter for many across the Northern Plains as the first snowfall hit the ground. With winter’s icy grip just around the corner, ranchers are busy preparing for the harsh, adverse weather that the season is notorious for. A primary concern for cattlemen is maintaining animal health during the cold winter months. For the majority of ranchers, the calves have been weaned and have filled the feedyard, creating a load of chores and worries.

So what are the proactive steps cattlemen should take to maintain optimal animal health in their feeder calves, post-weaning? For Terry Hendrix, DMV, of Artesian Veterinary Clinic in Artesian, SD, it begins and ends with the mama cow.

“If you want a healthy calf after weaning, you have got to think about the pregnant cow planning to calve this spring,” said Hendrix. “The first 12 hours of a calf’s life will determine their overall health and performance throughout their entire life. I can’t stress that enough.”

While Hendrix has plenty of advice in order to avoid sick calves in the feedlot, he strongly urges cattlemen to think about the mama cow to avoid health problems in the upcoming year. Cattlemen shouldn’t try to reduce input costs by ignoring the needs of the cowherd, and Hendrix warns that this practice will cost cattlemen in the end.

The following are Hendrix’ top five tips for taking care of the cow and raising a healthy calf.