Mont. Farm Bureau members selected to serve on Farm Bureau advisory committees | TSLN.com

Mont. Farm Bureau members selected to serve on Farm Bureau advisory committees

Six members of the Montana Farm Bureau have been selected to serve on the American Farm Bureau Issue Advisory Committees. Each of the Issue Advisory Committees averages 12 members. The committee members will attend the AFBF Advocacy Conference in February and will meet via webinar or other technology at least once a year. Committees serve as "brain trusts" on their issues for the AFBF president and board of directors, providing issue and policy development recommendations. Committee members also may be asked to serve as expert witnesses at congressional hearings and participate in advocacy efforts and leadership development training.

"The Montana Farm Bureau is proud that six of its members have been nominated and accepted to serve on these important advisory boards," noted MFBF President Bob Hanson.

Each of those members selected needs to be an agricultural producer involved in Farm Bureau leadership at the state or county level; have experience in the relevant issue areas; commit to the time needed for participation, and be able to communicate effectively.

Those serving on the committee from MFBF include Animal Health: Turk Stovall, cattle rancher, Billings; Environmental Regulations: Gary Heibertshausen, sheep producer, Alzada; Farm Policy: Bruce Wright, small grains farmer, Belgrade; Federal Lands: Tom DePuydt, cattle rancher and small grain producer, Saco; Market Structures: Larry Switzer, rancher, Richey and Food Safety, Sarah Boyer, chef and former restaurant owner, Bridger.

"We certainly appreciate the knowledge our members will bring to the issues committees, and their willingness to serve in this capacity," noted Hanson.

All Issue Advisory Committee members will participate in the AFBF Advocacy Conference, Feb. 23-26, in Washington, D.C., which will include political speakers, issue briefings, advocacy training and visits with lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

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–Montana Farm Bureau