More bang for the buck | TSLN.com

More bang for the buck

Kitzan photoStud rams at Rockdale Station, Dumbleyung, West Australia. Three of the stud rams will be utilized in the Kitzan program through the use of shipped semen. Note the heavily developed hind quarters and broad shoulders and backs on the group.

Ewes and lambs eating hay on a beautiful evening in May is a peaceful scene. Fat lambs nibble at the alfalfa leaves, their backs broad and long, hindquarters round and shoulders muscular. An excellent quality set of lambs in anyone’s book. The ewes look the same: muscular, yet feminine, a good layer of fat over the back, well muscled quarters, and an overall appearance of prosperity.

Nowhere is there evidence, when observing these ewes, that they just came through the harshest winter and spring in many years. Furthermore, they don’t look like ewes that are nursing big lambs. The biggest surprise is that they are just yearlings, and many of them have twins.

The Kitzans of Nisland, SD are dedicated sheep producers who are in the business for the long haul. Dwight is a second generation sheep producer, while Gwen is fourth generation. Their son Josh, now in college, is the fifth generation to be in the business. He intends to come back to the farm and the sheep when he completes his education.

Gwen was raised on a ranch that ran large bands of commercial ewes, while Dwight was raised in the registered business. He started raising registered Suffolks in 1973 and had them when he and Gwen married. In 1989 they added registered Rambouillets. They showed both breeds, as well as selling breeding stock.

It was after the awful winter of 1996-97 that the Kitzans started searching for a sheep that converted feed better, had good wool quality, was less labor intensive and possessed more “liveability.”

A day spent grading wool at an area ranch introduced Dwight to a young man from South Africa who talked of a breed that had good quality wool, plus were noted for their meat production and general vigor. Dwight was intrigued.

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At the county fair later that summer, the young South African man inspected Dwight’s top quality Suffolk and Rambouillet show string, but was not impressed.

“He looked at them and asked, ‘why do you Americans like these skinny, ugly sheep?’ Man, I was shocked!” said Dwight. “Those were great sheep and he said that.”

That comment got Dwight to start asking questions though, and the young man told him about the Samms sheep they ran in his home country.

Ewes and lambs eating hay on a beautiful evening in May is a peaceful scene. Fat lambs nibble at the alfalfa leaves, their backs broad and long, hindquarters round and shoulders muscular. An excellent quality set of lambs in anyone’s book. The ewes look the same: muscular, yet feminine, a good layer of fat over the back, well muscled quarters, and an overall appearance of prosperity.

Nowhere is there evidence, when observing these ewes, that they just came through the harshest winter and spring in many years. Furthermore, they don’t look like ewes that are nursing big lambs. The biggest surprise is that they are just yearlings, and many of them have twins.

The Kitzans of Nisland, SD are dedicated sheep producers who are in the business for the long haul. Dwight is a second generation sheep producer, while Gwen is fourth generation. Their son Josh, now in college, is the fifth generation to be in the business. He intends to come back to the farm and the sheep when he completes his education.

Gwen was raised on a ranch that ran large bands of commercial ewes, while Dwight was raised in the registered business. He started raising registered Suffolks in 1973 and had them when he and Gwen married. In 1989 they added registered Rambouillets. They showed both breeds, as well as selling breeding stock.

It was after the awful winter of 1996-97 that the Kitzans started searching for a sheep that converted feed better, had good wool quality, was less labor intensive and possessed more “liveability.”

A day spent grading wool at an area ranch introduced Dwight to a young man from South Africa who talked of a breed that had good quality wool, plus were noted for their meat production and general vigor. Dwight was intrigued.

At the county fair later that summer, the young South African man inspected Dwight’s top quality Suffolk and Rambouillet show string, but was not impressed.

“He looked at them and asked, ‘why do you Americans like these skinny, ugly sheep?’ Man, I was shocked!” said Dwight. “Those were great sheep and he said that.”

That comment got Dwight to start asking questions though, and the young man told him about the Samms sheep they ran in his home country.

Ewes and lambs eating hay on a beautiful evening in May is a peaceful scene. Fat lambs nibble at the alfalfa leaves, their backs broad and long, hindquarters round and shoulders muscular. An excellent quality set of lambs in anyone’s book. The ewes look the same: muscular, yet feminine, a good layer of fat over the back, well muscled quarters, and an overall appearance of prosperity.

Nowhere is there evidence, when observing these ewes, that they just came through the harshest winter and spring in many years. Furthermore, they don’t look like ewes that are nursing big lambs. The biggest surprise is that they are just yearlings, and many of them have twins.

The Kitzans of Nisland, SD are dedicated sheep producers who are in the business for the long haul. Dwight is a second generation sheep producer, while Gwen is fourth generation. Their son Josh, now in college, is the fifth generation to be in the business. He intends to come back to the farm and the sheep when he completes his education.

Gwen was raised on a ranch that ran large bands of commercial ewes, while Dwight was raised in the registered business. He started raising registered Suffolks in 1973 and had them when he and Gwen married. In 1989 they added registered Rambouillets. They showed both breeds, as well as selling breeding stock.

It was after the awful winter of 1996-97 that the Kitzans started searching for a sheep that converted feed better, had good wool quality, was less labor intensive and possessed more “liveability.”

A day spent grading wool at an area ranch introduced Dwight to a young man from South Africa who talked of a breed that had good quality wool, plus were noted for their meat production and general vigor. Dwight was intrigued.

At the county fair later that summer, the young South African man inspected Dwight’s top quality Suffolk and Rambouillet show string, but was not impressed.

“He looked at them and asked, ‘why do you Americans like these skinny, ugly sheep?’ Man, I was shocked!” said Dwight. “Those were great sheep and he said that.”

That comment got Dwight to start asking questions though, and the young man told him about the Samms sheep they ran in his home country.

Ewes and lambs eating hay on a beautiful evening in May is a peaceful scene. Fat lambs nibble at the alfalfa leaves, their backs broad and long, hindquarters round and shoulders muscular. An excellent quality set of lambs in anyone’s book. The ewes look the same: muscular, yet feminine, a good layer of fat over the back, well muscled quarters, and an overall appearance of prosperity.

Nowhere is there evidence, when observing these ewes, that they just came through the harshest winter and spring in many years. Furthermore, they don’t look like ewes that are nursing big lambs. The biggest surprise is that they are just yearlings, and many of them have twins.

The Kitzans of Nisland, SD are dedicated sheep producers who are in the business for the long haul. Dwight is a second generation sheep producer, while Gwen is fourth generation. Their son Josh, now in college, is the fifth generation to be in the business. He intends to come back to the farm and the sheep when he completes his education.

Gwen was raised on a ranch that ran large bands of commercial ewes, while Dwight was raised in the registered business. He started raising registered Suffolks in 1973 and had them when he and Gwen married. In 1989 they added registered Rambouillets. They showed both breeds, as well as selling breeding stock.

It was after the awful winter of 1996-97 that the Kitzans started searching for a sheep that converted feed better, had good wool quality, was less labor intensive and possessed more “liveability.”

A day spent grading wool at an area ranch introduced Dwight to a young man from South Africa who talked of a breed that had good quality wool, plus were noted for their meat production and general vigor. Dwight was intrigued.

At the county fair later that summer, the young South African man inspected Dwight’s top quality Suffolk and Rambouillet show string, but was not impressed.

“He looked at them and asked, ‘why do you Americans like these skinny, ugly sheep?’ Man, I was shocked!” said Dwight. “Those were great sheep and he said that.”

That comment got Dwight to start asking questions though, and the young man told him about the Samms sheep they ran in his home country.

Ewes and lambs eating hay on a beautiful evening in May is a peaceful scene. Fat lambs nibble at the alfalfa leaves, their backs broad and long, hindquarters round and shoulders muscular. An excellent quality set of lambs in anyone’s book. The ewes look the same: muscular, yet feminine, a good layer of fat over the back, well muscled quarters, and an overall appearance of prosperity.

Nowhere is there evidence, when observing these ewes, that they just came through the harshest winter and spring in many years. Furthermore, they don’t look like ewes that are nursing big lambs. The biggest surprise is that they are just yearlings, and many of them have twins.

The Kitzans of Nisland, SD are dedicated sheep producers who are in the business for the long haul. Dwight is a second generation sheep producer, while Gwen is fourth generation. Their son Josh, now in college, is the fifth generation to be in the business. He intends to come back to the farm and the sheep when he completes his education.

Gwen was raised on a ranch that ran large bands of commercial ewes, while Dwight was raised in the registered business. He started raising registered Suffolks in 1973 and had them when he and Gwen married. In 1989 they added registered Rambouillets. They showed both breeds, as well as selling breeding stock.

It was after the awful winter of 1996-97 that the Kitzans started searching for a sheep that converted feed better, had good wool quality, was less labor intensive and possessed more “liveability.”

A day spent grading wool at an area ranch introduced Dwight to a young man from South Africa who talked of a breed that had good quality wool, plus were noted for their meat production and general vigor. Dwight was intrigued.

At the county fair later that summer, the young South African man inspected Dwight’s top quality Suffolk and Rambouillet show string, but was not impressed.

“He looked at them and asked, ‘why do you Americans like these skinny, ugly sheep?’ Man, I was shocked!” said Dwight. “Those were great sheep and he said that.”

That comment got Dwight to start asking questions though, and the young man told him about the Samms sheep they ran in his home country.