Newell South Dakota 2010 Labor Day Rodeo community event | TSLN.com
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Newell South Dakota 2010 Labor Day Rodeo community event

Newell, SD’s annual Labor Day Rodeo coincided with the town’s Centennial Celebration and all-school reunion. Always enjoying a big crowd, the cold weather and keen breeze had little effect on the competitors or spectators, though cold beverages were not in as strong a demand as usual. A minute or two of rain only helped to settle the dust at the rodeo grounds.

The rodeo committee and Community Club worked tirelessly to have the grounds ready for the weekend, with repairs to the arena, grandstand and pens, plus sand added to the arena to improve the ground. It all came together for a successful, fun show.

Newell has hosted the family-oriented, amateur rodeo for decades, with the third and fourth generations of some families competing. Several generations of families have been involved with the production of the rodeo as well.



Chairman of the rodeo, Steve Swan from Newell, announced his retirement from the position after 26 years. He leaves big boots to fill, but no doubt someone will step forward and carry on.

Rodeo stock was rank, with the bucking horses brought by Schmidt Rodeos, and the bulls by Don Nixon, both based out of Belle Fourche, SD. Pickup men were Clete Schmidt of Belle Fourche, SD; Kirk Schuelke of Faith, SD, and assisting with the bulls, J.D. Mutchler of Mud Butte, SD. Bullfighters were Kyle Brown and Jeremy Wells.



Each year someone is chosen who has contributed time and work to the rodeo, and is deserving of a special thank you for their efforts.

This year Todd Williamson was awarded the Champion Helper Buckle for his years working at the roping end of the arena.

Unique to the Newell rodeo is the Sheep TeePeeing event. In the days of range lambing, a ewe and lamb were caught and placed inside of the small, four-legged canvas tent to help them mother up or during bad weather. That evolved into a timed event at the rodeo, which brings out dozens of teams vying for the prestigious World Championship Sheep Tee-Peeing award. Run in multiple heats due to entry numbers, the two teepee-ers must run from in front of the bucking chutes to the far end of the arena where a group of sheep are waiting. One has to carry the teepee, while the other runs ahead to catch a sheep. The teepee is placed over the sheep, the prongs (feet) are stomped into the dirt, and then the two must hold hands and run back to the other end of the arena where they are flagged for a time. The fastest time wins, providing their sheep stays in the teepee in some fashion until they’ve crossed the line. For obvious reasons, this is a sport usually done by young, strong individuals, as it is an exhausting ordeal at best. Both men and women compete and the crowd supports their favorites with gusto.

Being an amateur, family-style rodeo, young and old can both compete, which has always been the intent of the rodeo. Not sanctioned by any association, it is a fun time for anyone who wants to enter, and will remain the same for years to come.

Newell, SD’s annual Labor Day Rodeo coincided with the town’s Centennial Celebration and all-school reunion. Always enjoying a big crowd, the cold weather and keen breeze had little effect on the competitors or spectators, though cold beverages were not in as strong a demand as usual. A minute or two of rain only helped to settle the dust at the rodeo grounds.

The rodeo committee and Community Club worked tirelessly to have the grounds ready for the weekend, with repairs to the arena, grandstand and pens, plus sand added to the arena to improve the ground. It all came together for a successful, fun show.

Newell has hosted the family-oriented, amateur rodeo for decades, with the third and fourth generations of some families competing. Several generations of families have been involved with the production of the rodeo as well.

Chairman of the rodeo, Steve Swan from Newell, announced his retirement from the position after 26 years. He leaves big boots to fill, but no doubt someone will step forward and carry on.

Rodeo stock was rank, with the bucking horses brought by Schmidt Rodeos, and the bulls by Don Nixon, both based out of Belle Fourche, SD. Pickup men were Clete Schmidt of Belle Fourche, SD; Kirk Schuelke of Faith, SD, and assisting with the bulls, J.D. Mutchler of Mud Butte, SD. Bullfighters were Kyle Brown and Jeremy Wells.

Each year someone is chosen who has contributed time and work to the rodeo, and is deserving of a special thank you for their efforts.

This year Todd Williamson was awarded the Champion Helper Buckle for his years working at the roping end of the arena.

Unique to the Newell rodeo is the Sheep TeePeeing event. In the days of range lambing, a ewe and lamb were caught and placed inside of the small, four-legged canvas tent to help them mother up or during bad weather. That evolved into a timed event at the rodeo, which brings out dozens of teams vying for the prestigious World Championship Sheep Tee-Peeing award. Run in multiple heats due to entry numbers, the two teepee-ers must run from in front of the bucking chutes to the far end of the arena where a group of sheep are waiting. One has to carry the teepee, while the other runs ahead to catch a sheep. The teepee is placed over the sheep, the prongs (feet) are stomped into the dirt, and then the two must hold hands and run back to the other end of the arena where they are flagged for a time. The fastest time wins, providing their sheep stays in the teepee in some fashion until they’ve crossed the line. For obvious reasons, this is a sport usually done by young, strong individuals, as it is an exhausting ordeal at best. Both men and women compete and the crowd supports their favorites with gusto.

Being an amateur, family-style rodeo, young and old can both compete, which has always been the intent of the rodeo. Not sanctioned by any association, it is a fun time for anyone who wants to enter, and will remain the same for years to come.

Newell, SD’s annual Labor Day Rodeo coincided with the town’s Centennial Celebration and all-school reunion. Always enjoying a big crowd, the cold weather and keen breeze had little effect on the competitors or spectators, though cold beverages were not in as strong a demand as usual. A minute or two of rain only helped to settle the dust at the rodeo grounds.

The rodeo committee and Community Club worked tirelessly to have the grounds ready for the weekend, with repairs to the arena, grandstand and pens, plus sand added to the arena to improve the ground. It all came together for a successful, fun show.

Newell has hosted the family-oriented, amateur rodeo for decades, with the third and fourth generations of some families competing. Several generations of families have been involved with the production of the rodeo as well.

Chairman of the rodeo, Steve Swan from Newell, announced his retirement from the position after 26 years. He leaves big boots to fill, but no doubt someone will step forward and carry on.

Rodeo stock was rank, with the bucking horses brought by Schmidt Rodeos, and the bulls by Don Nixon, both based out of Belle Fourche, SD. Pickup men were Clete Schmidt of Belle Fourche, SD; Kirk Schuelke of Faith, SD, and assisting with the bulls, J.D. Mutchler of Mud Butte, SD. Bullfighters were Kyle Brown and Jeremy Wells.

Each year someone is chosen who has contributed time and work to the rodeo, and is deserving of a special thank you for their efforts.

This year Todd Williamson was awarded the Champion Helper Buckle for his years working at the roping end of the arena.

Unique to the Newell rodeo is the Sheep TeePeeing event. In the days of range lambing, a ewe and lamb were caught and placed inside of the small, four-legged canvas tent to help them mother up or during bad weather. That evolved into a timed event at the rodeo, which brings out dozens of teams vying for the prestigious World Championship Sheep Tee-Peeing award. Run in multiple heats due to entry numbers, the two teepee-ers must run from in front of the bucking chutes to the far end of the arena where a group of sheep are waiting. One has to carry the teepee, while the other runs ahead to catch a sheep. The teepee is placed over the sheep, the prongs (feet) are stomped into the dirt, and then the two must hold hands and run back to the other end of the arena where they are flagged for a time. The fastest time wins, providing their sheep stays in the teepee in some fashion until they’ve crossed the line. For obvious reasons, this is a sport usually done by young, strong individuals, as it is an exhausting ordeal at best. Both men and women compete and the crowd supports their favorites with gusto.

Being an amateur, family-style rodeo, young and old can both compete, which has always been the intent of the rodeo. Not sanctioned by any association, it is a fun time for anyone who wants to enter, and will remain the same for years to come.


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