North Dakota sheep scanning certification school is Aug. 23-24 | TSLN.com
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North Dakota sheep scanning certification school is Aug. 23-24

Sheep producers have struggled to measure their live animals’ carcass merit as a way to select sheep for superior genetics.

North Dakota State University (NDSU) is hosting a sheep scanning certification school Aug. 23-24 at the NDSU Hettinger Research Extension Center.

“Collecting loin-eye and fat-depth measurements via ultrasonic technologies is a very useful tool to predict carcass merit,” said Reid Redden, the NDSU Extension Service’s sheep specialist. “However, it has not become widely accepted in the sheep industry. Consequently, not enough trained technicians are available to collect this information for seedstock sheep producers.”



The school is designed to increase the number of trained technicians.

Participants will receive educational material on sheep scanning and learn methods of collecting loin-eye area and depth, back fat and body wall thickness.



They also will have the opportunity to test their skills so they can become certified to collect ultrasound data that can be submitted to the National Sheep Improvement Program.

The cost of the school is $200. Apply early because the program is limited to 20 people. Participants should bring their own ultrasound unit.

Rooms have been reserved under “ultrasound school” at the Mirror Lake Lodge until Aug. 15. Call 701-567-4571 to make reservations.

For more information about the school, contact Redden at 701-231-5597 or reid.redden@ndsu.edu or Christopher Schauer, NDSU animal scientist and Hettinger Research Extension Center director, at 701-567-4323 or christopher.schauer@ndsu.edu.

A registration form is available on the center’s Web site at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/HettingerREC/.

Sheep producers have struggled to measure their live animals’ carcass merit as a way to select sheep for superior genetics.

North Dakota State University (NDSU) is hosting a sheep scanning certification school Aug. 23-24 at the NDSU Hettinger Research Extension Center.

“Collecting loin-eye and fat-depth measurements via ultrasonic technologies is a very useful tool to predict carcass merit,” said Reid Redden, the NDSU Extension Service’s sheep specialist. “However, it has not become widely accepted in the sheep industry. Consequently, not enough trained technicians are available to collect this information for seedstock sheep producers.”

The school is designed to increase the number of trained technicians.

Participants will receive educational material on sheep scanning and learn methods of collecting loin-eye area and depth, back fat and body wall thickness.

They also will have the opportunity to test their skills so they can become certified to collect ultrasound data that can be submitted to the National Sheep Improvement Program.

The cost of the school is $200. Apply early because the program is limited to 20 people. Participants should bring their own ultrasound unit.

Rooms have been reserved under “ultrasound school” at the Mirror Lake Lodge until Aug. 15. Call 701-567-4571 to make reservations.

For more information about the school, contact Redden at 701-231-5597 or reid.redden@ndsu.edu or Christopher Schauer, NDSU animal scientist and Hettinger Research Extension Center director, at 701-567-4323 or christopher.schauer@ndsu.edu.

A registration form is available on the center’s Web site at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/HettingerREC/.


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