Noticing navicular & rodeo news | TSLN.com

Noticing navicular & rodeo news

For the Aug. 8, 2009 edition of Tri-State Livestock News.

The grass is curing, sun and wind are baking our land, and summer rodeos, horse shows and activities are at their peak. Constant competition and strenuous activity takes a toll on both riders and horses, and if lameness is going to show up, this is about the time it will manifest. Navicular disease is the most common cause of lameness in horses today, yet there’s much we don’t know about it.

The National Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) recently addressed that issue on the Web, with a question and answer. A reader asked: “I believe my horse is becoming navicular. What is the best thing I can do to make sure he is comfortable and healthy?”

The AAEP newsletter ran this reply, from Omar Maher, DVM, DACVS, New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH. “Navicular disease refers to a group of symptoms associated with foot pain in horses. With the advances of equine imaging abilities (especially Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography -CECT- and Magnetic Resonance Imaging -MRI) the veterinary community has come to learn that there are many different causes for foot pain in horses and many different ‘navicular disease’.

“For your horse, I would recommend to have your veterinarian come and examine him. He/she will probably do a physical examination, then watch him move (usually in a straight line, but also on a lunge line, preferably on a harder surface), and if your horse is showing any evidence of lameness, he will discuss with you the need of confirming that the feet are the source of the lameness. This is done by applying hoof testers and performing a nerve block. If your horse has indeed some foot pain, he will proceed with imaging modalities such as radiographs and potentially ultrasound, which is most common. Also, when available, affordable and needed, advanced imaging techniques such as CECT and MRI provide a plethora of information that is extremely helpful for the formulation of a treatment plan.

“If your horse is not lame but you are still concerned, radiographs might still be helpful to gain information and potentially get some additional guidance for shoeing.”

Professional farriers have a great deal of knowledge about the malady and can provide much relief to horses in pain; but obtaining the suggested information through your vet enables you to proceed in the best way to help your horse.

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Speakin’ of pain and injury sustained at the peak season of competition, pro bareback rider Tom McFarland from Wickenburg, AZ, had a horse flip with him during the Prescott rodeo in late June, resulting in 26 fractures in his riding arm and wrist. That kind of injury could be career-ending and no doubt the pain, inability and implications knocked Tom down considerably. But he got a real boost in Cheyenne the end of last month as fellow cowboys and friends came together for a benefit auction that raised nearly $30,000 toward his medical expenses. Tom, father of three little girls, said, “It blew us away to know that everybody cared that much. I just can’t thank everybody enough… The family that rodeo is… is just unbelievable.”

Contributions to Tom’s fund can be made at http://www.guarantybank.com or Guaranty Bank & Trust Company, 930 11th Avenue, Greeley, CO 80631.

Speakin’ of the rodeo family, Tri-State Country takes great pride in being home to many past, present and future champions and top competitors. That has been underlined once more in the selection of the Rodeo Hall of Fame Class of 2009, scheduled for induction into the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City next October 23rd through 25th.

North Dakota cowboys Joe Chase, Jr. and Tom Tescher will be inducted posthumously; along with rodeo producers Walter Alsbaugh of Colorado and Reg Kesler of Canada and Montana.

The name of Tescher is indelible on the minds of rodeo fans across our region, where several family members across several generations have carved their niches. In case you aren’t as familiar with Joe Chase, I’d like to give you some information about him.

Rodeo insider, historian and expert George Williams says, “It could readily be said of Joe Chase that the rodeo business never knew a more popular cowboy, better ambassador, or greater tough horse rider.”

Born in 1933 at Elbowoods on the Fort Berthold Reservation, Chase won the North Dakota Bronc Riding Championship at Sanish when he was just 16, riding what were described as “big, rank Nick Fettig horses.” That may have led to Joe’s comment that he “cut his eye teeth on big bucking horses.”

That same year Joe won the Amateur Bronc Riding on Leo Cramer’s big horses at Mandan and the bronc riding at Mobridge, then was compelled to purchase a Rodeo Cowboy’s Association (RCA) membership card. Indicative of his flawless honesty and character, Joe never worked another amateur rodeo, though still in high school. He also turned down an offer from rising star Casey Tibbs to haul him and split entry fees to Madison Square Garden that fall; instead following his mother’s urging to enroll in college at Fort Collins.

That initiated an intercollegiate bronc riding career that made cowboys sit up and take notice, beginning when Joe showed up at the practice pen of Colorado A&M’s rodeo club wearing porcupine-quilled moccasins to ride their previously-unrideable bronc with ease. College rodeo took Joe from Colorado A&M to Hardin Simmons in Texas and on to Oklahoma A&M, where he secured a degree in animal husbandry and headed back to the ranch in North Dakota.

Rodeo continued to draw him away at times, often enough to defeat the best broncs (including Jake, War Paint, Joker K, Snake, War Paint), and claim titles at the top cowboy venues of his era. George Williams says, “Joe won some of the biggest rodeos in the business… the Cow Palace, Nampa, Great Falls, Casper, to name a few… while ranching, putting up hay in the summer.”

We tip our ol’ Tri-State Stetson to the memory and the families of these cowboys, happy to know they’ll soon be enshrined as they deserve! Next time we’ll talk about the living honorees.

For now, we’re plumb to the end of this ol’ lariat rope once more…

The grass is curing, sun and wind are baking our land, and summer rodeos, horse shows and activities are at their peak. Constant competition and strenuous activity takes a toll on both riders and horses, and if lameness is going to show up, this is about the time it will manifest. Navicular disease is the most common cause of lameness in horses today, yet there’s much we don’t know about it.

The National Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) recently addressed that issue on the Web, with a question and answer. A reader asked: “I believe my horse is becoming navicular. What is the best thing I can do to make sure he is comfortable and healthy?”

The AAEP newsletter ran this reply, from Omar Maher, DVM, DACVS, New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH. “Navicular disease refers to a group of symptoms associated with foot pain in horses. With the advances of equine imaging abilities (especially Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography -CECT- and Magnetic Resonance Imaging -MRI) the veterinary community has come to learn that there are many different causes for foot pain in horses and many different ‘navicular disease’.

“For your horse, I would recommend to have your veterinarian come and examine him. He/she will probably do a physical examination, then watch him move (usually in a straight line, but also on a lunge line, preferably on a harder surface), and if your horse is showing any evidence of lameness, he will discuss with you the need of confirming that the feet are the source of the lameness. This is done by applying hoof testers and performing a nerve block. If your horse has indeed some foot pain, he will proceed with imaging modalities such as radiographs and potentially ultrasound, which is most common. Also, when available, affordable and needed, advanced imaging techniques such as CECT and MRI provide a plethora of information that is extremely helpful for the formulation of a treatment plan.

“If your horse is not lame but you are still concerned, radiographs might still be helpful to gain information and potentially get some additional guidance for shoeing.”

Professional farriers have a great deal of knowledge about the malady and can provide much relief to horses in pain; but obtaining the suggested information through your vet enables you to proceed in the best way to help your horse.

Speakin’ of pain and injury sustained at the peak season of competition, pro bareback rider Tom McFarland from Wickenburg, AZ, had a horse flip with him during the Prescott rodeo in late June, resulting in 26 fractures in his riding arm and wrist. That kind of injury could be career-ending and no doubt the pain, inability and implications knocked Tom down considerably. But he got a real boost in Cheyenne the end of last month as fellow cowboys and friends came together for a benefit auction that raised nearly $30,000 toward his medical expenses. Tom, father of three little girls, said, “It blew us away to know that everybody cared that much. I just can’t thank everybody enough… The family that rodeo is… is just unbelievable.”

Contributions to Tom’s fund can be made at http://www.guarantybank.com or Guaranty Bank & Trust Company, 930 11th Avenue, Greeley, CO 80631.

Speakin’ of the rodeo family, Tri-State Country takes great pride in being home to many past, present and future champions and top competitors. That has been underlined once more in the selection of the Rodeo Hall of Fame Class of 2009, scheduled for induction into the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City next October 23rd through 25th.

North Dakota cowboys Joe Chase, Jr. and Tom Tescher will be inducted posthumously; along with rodeo producers Walter Alsbaugh of Colorado and Reg Kesler of Canada and Montana.

The name of Tescher is indelible on the minds of rodeo fans across our region, where several family members across several generations have carved their niches. In case you aren’t as familiar with Joe Chase, I’d like to give you some information about him.

Rodeo insider, historian and expert George Williams says, “It could readily be said of Joe Chase that the rodeo business never knew a more popular cowboy, better ambassador, or greater tough horse rider.”

Born in 1933 at Elbowoods on the Fort Berthold Reservation, Chase won the North Dakota Bronc Riding Championship at Sanish when he was just 16, riding what were described as “big, rank Nick Fettig horses.” That may have led to Joe’s comment that he “cut his eye teeth on big bucking horses.”

That same year Joe won the Amateur Bronc Riding on Leo Cramer’s big horses at Mandan and the bronc riding at Mobridge, then was compelled to purchase a Rodeo Cowboy’s Association (RCA) membership card. Indicative of his flawless honesty and character, Joe never worked another amateur rodeo, though still in high school. He also turned down an offer from rising star Casey Tibbs to haul him and split entry fees to Madison Square Garden that fall; instead following his mother’s urging to enroll in college at Fort Collins.

That initiated an intercollegiate bronc riding career that made cowboys sit up and take notice, beginning when Joe showed up at the practice pen of Colorado A&M’s rodeo club wearing porcupine-quilled moccasins to ride their previously-unrideable bronc with ease. College rodeo took Joe from Colorado A&M to Hardin Simmons in Texas and on to Oklahoma A&M, where he secured a degree in animal husbandry and headed back to the ranch in North Dakota.

Rodeo continued to draw him away at times, often enough to defeat the best broncs (including Jake, War Paint, Joker K, Snake, War Paint), and claim titles at the top cowboy venues of his era. George Williams says, “Joe won some of the biggest rodeos in the business… the Cow Palace, Nampa, Great Falls, Casper, to name a few… while ranching, putting up hay in the summer.”

We tip our ol’ Tri-State Stetson to the memory and the families of these cowboys, happy to know they’ll soon be enshrined as they deserve! Next time we’ll talk about the living honorees.

For now, we’re plumb to the end of this ol’ lariat rope once more…