October excitement | TSLN.com

October excitement

For the Oct. 3, 2009 edition of Tri-State Livestock News.

October brings all kinds of exciting equine events to Tri-State Country. The Northern International Livestock Exposition (NILE) at Billings, MT happens Oct. 10-17, offering pro-rodeo, ranch rodeo, horse shows, sales, bull riding, a huge Western Expo, and much, much more. Check it all out at http://www.thenile.org/.

Another important event for our readers is the Badlands Circuit Finals. State Fair Center in Minot, ND will host that premiere rodeo Oct. 8-11; kicking it off with a barbecue at the Minot Chamber of Commerce at 6 p.m. on Oct. 7th. A cowboy Calcutta and back numbers presentation will follow the meal, at the State Fair Center’s atrium. Special events of the week will include a Wild West Rodeo on Oct. 8th for special kids. The Wrangler “Tough Enough To Wear Pink” performance is Oct. 9th, benefitting Trinity Health’s cancer rehab program through the Minot Family YMCA. The goal for that event is to exceed the $43,000 raised at last year’s TETWP performance, which ranked 7th highest in the nation. Learn all about this great rodeo by checking out http://www.MinotYsMensRodeo.com or by calling 701-852-5577.

We’ve talked about rabies in horses off and on, and now the death of a horse in Colorado has brought the specter closer to our pastures. According to Brian Newsome at http://www.gazette.com, health officials in Colorado reported on Tuesday, Sept. 15th, “The death of a rabid horse in Black Forest provides new evidence that a disease once considered a negligible threat in Colorado is now a serious public health problem.”

The horse was euthanized on Sept. 11th and testing proved it the first case of a rabid horse in Colorado in the last quarter century. Health officials believe the disease was transmitted to the horse by a rabid skunk, marking the first known ‘spillover’ casualty of a strain of skunk rabies that’s shown up in Colorado for the first time in decades.

In recent months six rabid skunks have been discovered in El Paso County, where health department medical director Dr. Bernadette Albanese said, “I think it’s a seminal event.” She believes the fact a horse contracted the virus means there are a number of infected skunks moving around the region. Skunk rabies had not been reported in that area since 1970.

Rabies becoming more prevalent in animals that have frequent contact with humans increases the risk of someone having to undergo the expensive post exposure shot regimen; and changes the way health officials handle animal-bite cases. In light of this information, health officials are urging people to vaccinate pets and livestock for the virus, which attacks the nervous system and is usually transmitted through infected saliva.

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Rabies is so rare in horses that vaccines have only recently been recommended for them, according to Falcon, CO large-animal vet Dr. Jim Friedly. He’s now recommending horse owners become very aware of any unusual signs with their horses and handle them with extra caution; particularly noting any drooling or foaming around the mouth, then not trying to inspect the horse’s mouth for a cause because rabies could be involved.

Contact your vet if any pet is bitten or scratched by a wild animal; call a doctor immediately if you suspect you’ve been exposed to rabies; stay away from any animal behaving abnormally, such as nocturnal skunks appearing in broad daylight; and wear rubber gloves or lift the carcass with a shovel or other tool if you must dispose of a dead skunk from your property, double- bagging it for the garbage.

Most of you are no doubt aware of the case of a horse named Dually and the situation involving him around the July 4th weekend. We have only briefly alluded to that issue here because of pending legal action and not wishing to report anything based on less than fact. However there is now a news release from David Montgomery through the Capital Journal, stating that Flint David Dahl, 22, of Fort Pierre, SD was arrested Tuesday, Sept. 29th “on charges of stealing a rodeo horse named Dually and treating him inhumanely.”

According to official affidavits, interviews were conducted by Stanley County Sheriff’s Deputies through July 13th; and as recently as Sept. 16th by agents with the state Division of Criminal Investigation.

Numerous witnesses testified they saw Dahl riding the horse early the morning of July 5, and observed various wounds on the horse; and Dually was recovered on Dahl’s father’s property. Charges filed against Dahl include grand theft (a felony) and inhumane treatment of an animal (a misdemeanor). The first charge is punishable by up to 10 years imprisonment in a state penitentiary and a fine of up to $20,000. Inhumane treatment of an animal is punishable by up to one year in a county jail and a fine of up to $2,000.

It’s further stated that Dahl “turned himself in Tuesday afternoon and was released after posting $5,000 bond.” No court date has been set.

Dr. Steve Tornberg, the vet who attended Dually, told investigators the horse “had suffered rope burns, minor lacerations, a quarter crack in a hoof and sore suspensory ligaments.” Tornberg further stated he “had not seen a horse with rope burns that numerous or serious in 30 years.”

As for Dually’s present condition, his owner Wendy Halweg reports he has slowly recovered during the months since the incident. He was finally released from the vet clinic on Aug. 5th. Hopefully justice will be done in this case and the world will be a safer place for innocent horses around rodeos and horse events.

We’ve had a lot to say around here about the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and its transitions and up’s and down’s of recent months. I know most of you readers are interested in the subject. We hear the political community talk about ‘transparency’ of late, and perhaps the PRCA is making an effort to be transparent – in that PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman has begun conducting a series titled Straight Talk with the Commissioner. PRCA Properties has produced those talks in video, which can be accessed at http://www.ProRodeo.com home page; or on http://www.RodeoUp.Com the official video site of the PRCA.

Looks like that’s the end of this ol’ lariat rope once more…

October brings all kinds of exciting equine events to Tri-State Country. The Northern International Livestock Exposition (NILE) at Billings, MT happens Oct. 10-17, offering pro-rodeo, ranch rodeo, horse shows, sales, bull riding, a huge Western Expo, and much, much more. Check it all out at http://www.thenile.org/.

Another important event for our readers is the Badlands Circuit Finals. State Fair Center in Minot, ND will host that premiere rodeo Oct. 8-11; kicking it off with a barbecue at the Minot Chamber of Commerce at 6 p.m. on Oct. 7th. A cowboy Calcutta and back numbers presentation will follow the meal, at the State Fair Center’s atrium. Special events of the week will include a Wild West Rodeo on Oct. 8th for special kids. The Wrangler “Tough Enough To Wear Pink” performance is Oct. 9th, benefitting Trinity Health’s cancer rehab program through the Minot Family YMCA. The goal for that event is to exceed the $43,000 raised at last year’s TETWP performance, which ranked 7th highest in the nation. Learn all about this great rodeo by checking out http://www.MinotYsMensRodeo.com or by calling 701-852-5577.

We’ve talked about rabies in horses off and on, and now the death of a horse in Colorado has brought the specter closer to our pastures. According to Brian Newsome at http://www.gazette.com, health officials in Colorado reported on Tuesday, Sept. 15th, “The death of a rabid horse in Black Forest provides new evidence that a disease once considered a negligible threat in Colorado is now a serious public health problem.”

The horse was euthanized on Sept. 11th and testing proved it the first case of a rabid horse in Colorado in the last quarter century. Health officials believe the disease was transmitted to the horse by a rabid skunk, marking the first known ‘spillover’ casualty of a strain of skunk rabies that’s shown up in Colorado for the first time in decades.

In recent months six rabid skunks have been discovered in El Paso County, where health department medical director Dr. Bernadette Albanese said, “I think it’s a seminal event.” She believes the fact a horse contracted the virus means there are a number of infected skunks moving around the region. Skunk rabies had not been reported in that area since 1970.

Rabies becoming more prevalent in animals that have frequent contact with humans increases the risk of someone having to undergo the expensive post exposure shot regimen; and changes the way health officials handle animal-bite cases. In light of this information, health officials are urging people to vaccinate pets and livestock for the virus, which attacks the nervous system and is usually transmitted through infected saliva.

Rabies is so rare in horses that vaccines have only recently been recommended for them, according to Falcon, CO large-animal vet Dr. Jim Friedly. He’s now recommending horse owners become very aware of any unusual signs with their horses and handle them with extra caution; particularly noting any drooling or foaming around the mouth, then not trying to inspect the horse’s mouth for a cause because rabies could be involved.

Contact your vet if any pet is bitten or scratched by a wild animal; call a doctor immediately if you suspect you’ve been exposed to rabies; stay away from any animal behaving abnormally, such as nocturnal skunks appearing in broad daylight; and wear rubber gloves or lift the carcass with a shovel or other tool if you must dispose of a dead skunk from your property, double- bagging it for the garbage.

Most of you are no doubt aware of the case of a horse named Dually and the situation involving him around the July 4th weekend. We have only briefly alluded to that issue here because of pending legal action and not wishing to report anything based on less than fact. However there is now a news release from David Montgomery through the Capital Journal, stating that Flint David Dahl, 22, of Fort Pierre, SD was arrested Tuesday, Sept. 29th “on charges of stealing a rodeo horse named Dually and treating him inhumanely.”

According to official affidavits, interviews were conducted by Stanley County Sheriff’s Deputies through July 13th; and as recently as Sept. 16th by agents with the state Division of Criminal Investigation.

Numerous witnesses testified they saw Dahl riding the horse early the morning of July 5, and observed various wounds on the horse; and Dually was recovered on Dahl’s father’s property. Charges filed against Dahl include grand theft (a felony) and inhumane treatment of an animal (a misdemeanor). The first charge is punishable by up to 10 years imprisonment in a state penitentiary and a fine of up to $20,000. Inhumane treatment of an animal is punishable by up to one year in a county jail and a fine of up to $2,000.

It’s further stated that Dahl “turned himself in Tuesday afternoon and was released after posting $5,000 bond.” No court date has been set.

Dr. Steve Tornberg, the vet who attended Dually, told investigators the horse “had suffered rope burns, minor lacerations, a quarter crack in a hoof and sore suspensory ligaments.” Tornberg further stated he “had not seen a horse with rope burns that numerous or serious in 30 years.”

As for Dually’s present condition, his owner Wendy Halweg reports he has slowly recovered during the months since the incident. He was finally released from the vet clinic on Aug. 5th. Hopefully justice will be done in this case and the world will be a safer place for innocent horses around rodeos and horse events.

We’ve had a lot to say around here about the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and its transitions and up’s and down’s of recent months. I know most of you readers are interested in the subject. We hear the political community talk about ‘transparency’ of late, and perhaps the PRCA is making an effort to be transparent – in that PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman has begun conducting a series titled Straight Talk with the Commissioner. PRCA Properties has produced those talks in video, which can be accessed at http://www.ProRodeo.com home page; or on http://www.RodeoUp.Com the official video site of the PRCA.

Looks like that’s the end of this ol’ lariat rope once more…