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Patrick McCue: Keeping foals safe and healthy

Photo by Bill BrewsterDr. Patrick M. McCue, DVM, Diplomate ACT shares detailed information on safe foaling procedures at the Feb. 24 CSR Equine Sports Medicine Center winter lecture series.

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A renowned equine reproduction expert from Colorado State University provided more than two dozen horse owners with detailed information on safe foaling procedures and foal care during the February lecture at the CSR Equine Sports Medicine Center.

The two-hour lecture on Feb. 24 was presented by Dr. Patrick M. McCue, DVM, Diplomate ACT, as the third program in the sport medicine center’s winter lecture series at the ranch.

McCue, who serves as the director of the Equine Reproduction Laboratory at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, covered pre-foaling plans and procedures, on-ranch obstetrics and post-foaling protocol.



“A key point for all of you is to talk with your veterinarian about the upcoming foaling and breeding season before it actually gets underway,” McCue said. “It’s critical to have a foaling kit ready ahead of time that is prepared in conjunction with your veterinarian’s recommendations.”

As a reference point, the veterinarian said it is important to calculate the foaling due date based on an average of a 340-day gestation period. The due date can be determined by subtracting 25 days from the ovulation date, or last breeding date, he noted. The accuracy of the due date is highly dependent on the accuracy of the breeding date and it is difficult to determine for pasture-bred mares.



If mares are going to foal in confined quarters like stalls, instead of in pastures or large paddocks, they should be moved to the foaling site at least seven to fourteen days prior to the due date to allow for acclimation to the new environment. In this way, he said, mares begin to develop immunity to local pathogenic organisms and the antibodies will be passed to the foal in the form of colostrum.

If stalls are being used, McCue recommended a 12- by 24-foot size.

A renowned equine reproduction expert from Colorado State University provided more than two dozen horse owners with detailed information on safe foaling procedures and foal care during the February lecture at the CSR Equine Sports Medicine Center.

The two-hour lecture on Feb. 24 was presented by Dr. Patrick M. McCue, DVM, Diplomate ACT, as the third program in the sport medicine center’s winter lecture series at the ranch.

McCue, who serves as the director of the Equine Reproduction Laboratory at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, covered pre-foaling plans and procedures, on-ranch obstetrics and post-foaling protocol.

“A key point for all of you is to talk with your veterinarian about the upcoming foaling and breeding season before it actually gets underway,” McCue said. “It’s critical to have a foaling kit ready ahead of time that is prepared in conjunction with your veterinarian’s recommendations.”

As a reference point, the veterinarian said it is important to calculate the foaling due date based on an average of a 340-day gestation period. The due date can be determined by subtracting 25 days from the ovulation date, or last breeding date, he noted. The accuracy of the due date is highly dependent on the accuracy of the breeding date and it is difficult to determine for pasture-bred mares.

If mares are going to foal in confined quarters like stalls, instead of in pastures or large paddocks, they should be moved to the foaling site at least seven to fourteen days prior to the due date to allow for acclimation to the new environment. In this way, he said, mares begin to develop immunity to local pathogenic organisms and the antibodies will be passed to the foal in the form of colostrum.

If stalls are being used, McCue recommended a 12- by 24-foot size.

A renowned equine reproduction expert from Colorado State University provided more than two dozen horse owners with detailed information on safe foaling procedures and foal care during the February lecture at the CSR Equine Sports Medicine Center.

The two-hour lecture on Feb. 24 was presented by Dr. Patrick M. McCue, DVM, Diplomate ACT, as the third program in the sport medicine center’s winter lecture series at the ranch.

McCue, who serves as the director of the Equine Reproduction Laboratory at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, covered pre-foaling plans and procedures, on-ranch obstetrics and post-foaling protocol.

“A key point for all of you is to talk with your veterinarian about the upcoming foaling and breeding season before it actually gets underway,” McCue said. “It’s critical to have a foaling kit ready ahead of time that is prepared in conjunction with your veterinarian’s recommendations.”

As a reference point, the veterinarian said it is important to calculate the foaling due date based on an average of a 340-day gestation period. The due date can be determined by subtracting 25 days from the ovulation date, or last breeding date, he noted. The accuracy of the due date is highly dependent on the accuracy of the breeding date and it is difficult to determine for pasture-bred mares.

If mares are going to foal in confined quarters like stalls, instead of in pastures or large paddocks, they should be moved to the foaling site at least seven to fourteen days prior to the due date to allow for acclimation to the new environment. In this way, he said, mares begin to develop immunity to local pathogenic organisms and the antibodies will be passed to the foal in the form of colostrum.

If stalls are being used, McCue recommended a 12- by 24-foot size.

A renowned equine reproduction expert from Colorado State University provided more than two dozen horse owners with detailed information on safe foaling procedures and foal care during the February lecture at the CSR Equine Sports Medicine Center.

The two-hour lecture on Feb. 24 was presented by Dr. Patrick M. McCue, DVM, Diplomate ACT, as the third program in the sport medicine center’s winter lecture series at the ranch.

McCue, who serves as the director of the Equine Reproduction Laboratory at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, covered pre-foaling plans and procedures, on-ranch obstetrics and post-foaling protocol.

“A key point for all of you is to talk with your veterinarian about the upcoming foaling and breeding season before it actually gets underway,” McCue said. “It’s critical to have a foaling kit ready ahead of time that is prepared in conjunction with your veterinarian’s recommendations.”

As a reference point, the veterinarian said it is important to calculate the foaling due date based on an average of a 340-day gestation period. The due date can be determined by subtracting 25 days from the ovulation date, or last breeding date, he noted. The accuracy of the due date is highly dependent on the accuracy of the breeding date and it is difficult to determine for pasture-bred mares.

If mares are going to foal in confined quarters like stalls, instead of in pastures or large paddocks, they should be moved to the foaling site at least seven to fourteen days prior to the due date to allow for acclimation to the new environment. In this way, he said, mares begin to develop immunity to local pathogenic organisms and the antibodies will be passed to the foal in the form of colostrum.

If stalls are being used, McCue recommended a 12- by 24-foot size.


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