Pipeline Project carves through prairie | TSLN.com
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Pipeline Project carves through prairie

Amanda Nolz
Photos by Amanda NolzMike Sibson stands in waist-deep tire tracks made by the workers after one of the summer's heavy rainfalls. Sibson says farmers always know that Mother Nature is in charge and you can't tear up a field after a rain, but the work continued on the pipeline despite the rains.

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Over 30 years ago, Mike and Sue Sibson were like every other young couple entering into the beef cattle business. They were full of ambition and were optimistic about their future in the industry. They purchased their farm site in western Miner County, SD, where they built a home and worked to pay off the land with crops and cattle. Today, the Sibsons run a successful operation, backgrounding yearlings and keeping them on pastures through the winter, as well as planting corn and wheat.

As Mike and Sue paved their way into the business, following their family’s tradition in agriculture, their dreams were slashed literally in two as the Keystone Pipeline carved its way through their pasture land. In a place where crops can’t grow, these pastures were home to native grasses and virgin soil, until a pipeline project, spanning 1,000 miles in either direction severed their land and forever changed the rural communities in its path.

Over 30 years ago, Mike and Sue Sibson were like every other young couple entering into the beef cattle business. They were full of ambition and were optimistic about their future in the industry. They purchased their farm site in western Miner County, SD, where they built a home and worked to pay off the land with crops and cattle. Today, the Sibsons run a successful operation, backgrounding yearlings and keeping them on pastures through the winter, as well as planting corn and wheat.

As Mike and Sue paved their way into the business, following their family’s tradition in agriculture, their dreams were slashed literally in two as the Keystone Pipeline carved its way through their pasture land. In a place where crops can’t grow, these pastures were home to native grasses and virgin soil, until a pipeline project, spanning 1,000 miles in either direction severed their land and forever changed the rural communities in its path.

Over 30 years ago, Mike and Sue Sibson were like every other young couple entering into the beef cattle business. They were full of ambition and were optimistic about their future in the industry. They purchased their farm site in western Miner County, SD, where they built a home and worked to pay off the land with crops and cattle. Today, the Sibsons run a successful operation, backgrounding yearlings and keeping them on pastures through the winter, as well as planting corn and wheat.

As Mike and Sue paved their way into the business, following their family’s tradition in agriculture, their dreams were slashed literally in two as the Keystone Pipeline carved its way through their pasture land. In a place where crops can’t grow, these pastures were home to native grasses and virgin soil, until a pipeline project, spanning 1,000 miles in either direction severed their land and forever changed the rural communities in its path.

Over 30 years ago, Mike and Sue Sibson were like every other young couple entering into the beef cattle business. They were full of ambition and were optimistic about their future in the industry. They purchased their farm site in western Miner County, SD, where they built a home and worked to pay off the land with crops and cattle. Today, the Sibsons run a successful operation, backgrounding yearlings and keeping them on pastures through the winter, as well as planting corn and wheat.

As Mike and Sue paved their way into the business, following their family’s tradition in agriculture, their dreams were slashed literally in two as the Keystone Pipeline carved its way through their pasture land. In a place where crops can’t grow, these pastures were home to native grasses and virgin soil, until a pipeline project, spanning 1,000 miles in either direction severed their land and forever changed the rural communities in its path.

Over 30 years ago, Mike and Sue Sibson were like every other young couple entering into the beef cattle business. They were full of ambition and were optimistic about their future in the industry. They purchased their farm site in western Miner County, SD, where they built a home and worked to pay off the land with crops and cattle. Today, the Sibsons run a successful operation, backgrounding yearlings and keeping them on pastures through the winter, as well as planting corn and wheat.

As Mike and Sue paved their way into the business, following their family’s tradition in agriculture, their dreams were slashed literally in two as the Keystone Pipeline carved its way through their pasture land. In a place where crops can’t grow, these pastures were home to native grasses and virgin soil, until a pipeline project, spanning 1,000 miles in either direction severed their land and forever changed the rural communities in its path.

Over 30 years ago, Mike and Sue Sibson were like every other young couple entering into the beef cattle business. They were full of ambition and were optimistic about their future in the industry. They purchased their farm site in western Miner County, SD, where they built a home and worked to pay off the land with crops and cattle. Today, the Sibsons run a successful operation, backgrounding yearlings and keeping them on pastures through the winter, as well as planting corn and wheat.

As Mike and Sue paved their way into the business, following their family’s tradition in agriculture, their dreams were slashed literally in two as the Keystone Pipeline carved its way through their pasture land. In a place where crops can’t grow, these pastures were home to native grasses and virgin soil, until a pipeline project, spanning 1,000 miles in either direction severed their land and forever changed the rural communities in its path.


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