Polling all horse owners | TSLN.com

Polling all horse owners

Today’s world is inundated with surveys and polls… I refuse all telephone polling as an intrusion on my time and privacy, but I also know some surveys and polls are helpful and beneficial.

If you’re willing to let your voice count for equines, you may wish to visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=bIUU08nvuI_2fLQ1Q0_2fdEyOQ_3d_3d. That’s where you can participate in an evaluation of participation trends in the U.S. equine industry and the most important issues facing the industry, on behalf of American Horse Publications (AHP). AHP is a non-profit association which promotes better understanding and communications within the equine publishing industry; members include equine-related publications, professionals, students, organizations and businesses. Dr. C. Jill Stowe is providing consulting services for data collection and analysis to the AHP; Dr. Stowe is currently an assistant professor of Agricultural Economics at the University of Kentucky. The survey is sponsored by Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health and Pfizer Animal Health.

If you currently own, manage, or lease at least one horse, are 18 years of age or over, and live in the United States, you are eligible to complete the survey. Please answer the questions in this survey to the best of your ability, at your earliest convenience, and only one per household. The survey closes Jan. 15, 2010; and is anonymous. This means that no one, not even members of the research team, will know that the information you give comes from you, and only aggregated results of the survey will be presented.

On the horse health front, if you haul horses into or out of Texas you need to be aware of an equine piroplasmosis outbreak at Kleberg, TX, involving 32 head of Quarter Horses. The tick-borne protozoal disease creates clinical signs common to many diseases, including poor appetite and weight loss, and can lead to death. It transmits from horse to horse through ticks or needles, and can affect horses, donkeys, mules or zebras. It was confirmed in the state of Missouri last June, with a related case found in Kansas.

The Texas property where the disease has just been confirmed is under quarantine. The first sick horse went to a vet and was tested Oct. 2; the positive test for equine piroplasmosis was returned Oct. 12th. Another 96 horses have been tested and results are pending.

As a result of this, Canada has closed its border to horses from Texas until the outbreak is resolved; and horses from any other U.S. state wishing to enter Canada will need additional certification of not having been in Texas for at least 21 days.

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As long as we’re talking equine disease, we should inform you the University of Kentucky’s Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center is on the cutting edge of disease tracking with a new online file-keeping system known as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS). LIMS will serve as an integrated online system for farmers to report incidence of disease by county, correlating with the technology used by the state veterinarian’s office. It will help the LDDC track disease reports in near real time – a feature that has not been available before – and prepare for infectious outbreaks or other disease situations, particularly those affecting the state’s equine population. The goal of the new system is to avoid pandemics similar to the mare reproductive loss syndrome occurrences in 2001. While not a contagious disease, MRLS resulted in losses to Kentucky’s horse industry of an estimated $340 million and about 30 percent of that season’s Thoroughbred foal crop. By organizing disease incidences by geographic location, scientists and veterinarians can predict trends and get a jump-start on treatments for seasonal illness (such as MRLS was). The system makes information available to farm managers and private practitioners, so they can administer appropriate vaccinations and implement necessary protocols to keep up with any predicted rise in diseases.

LDDC Director Craig Carter, DVM, PhD, Dip. ACVPM, said, “In the short term, it helps to get diagnostic test results down to the farm level in an accurate, timely fashion (to) help the local vet manage single outbreaks. In the long term, it’s part of a statewide animal health information network that will give us a broad awareness of what’s happening all across the state.”

LIMS also will aid in maintaining agricultural biosecurity by detecting potential outbreaks of diseases caused by any previously unidentified pathogens. For more information contact LDDC at 859/253-0571 or visit http://www.lddc.uky.edu/.

High school and Junior High Rodeo through the National High School Rodeo Association and their Wrangler Division offer great opportunities for American youth who love rodeo. Action from the best of their events is now available every Wednesday night at 9 p.m. Eastern on RFD TV.

One interesting (and I believe very positive) sidelight to these youth rodeo events is the NHSRA Shooting program, which gives young people a chance to learn and excel at rifle and shotgun shooting skills. Each state holds a Shooting Finals which qualifies youth to participate in the National Shooting Finals. Additionally, the National Rifle Association annually invites a youth to represent the NHSRA in the NRA-Brownell’s National Shooting Sports Ambassador Program. That program involves a $2,000 award, travel to the SHOT Show, meeting industry leaders and celebrities, and Ambassador Apparel jacket, shooting vest, book bag, etc.

At present the NHSRA is seeking volunteers who have shotgun or rifle shooting experience to help with these programs through becoming a Credentialed Coach or an NRA Certified Range Safety Officer.

To apply for the Ambassador program contact Lyn Larsen at llarsen@nhsra.org. To learn more about helping the NHSRA as a coach or safety officer, or to inquire about NRA educational programs offered to the NHSRA, contact NRA National Co-op Coordinator Claudia Olsen; colsen@nrahq.org or (703)267-1597.

We want’a tip our ol’ Tri-State Stetson to the Johnny Holloway family for puttin’ on what we hear was another great Cowboy Reunion at First Gold in Deadwood, SD, last Saturday nite. Our ranch day-work jobs prevented us from attending this year… or maybe I should say the limitations imposed by our old age prevented it. We weren’t doing daywork in the night… but anymore we can’t seem to play all night and work all day as well…

Anyhow, we’ve heard from several sources the event was bigger and better than ever, and a great time was had by all. We’re proud to learn our dear friend and favorite old-time horseman Gene Ulrich of Faith, SD, received the coveted T.C. Holloway bronc bronze as “Oldest Cowboy” at the gathering – we’re tippin’ the ol’ Tri-State Stetson to you, Gene. If you don’t know Gene, or if you don’t have any of his books on horse sense, you really need to fix that – give him a call at (605)967-2481… an’ tell him I sent ya’!

Looks like that’s the end of this ol’ lariat rope once more… my cowboy and I are off to another ranch job…

Today’s world is inundated with surveys and polls… I refuse all telephone polling as an intrusion on my time and privacy, but I also know some surveys and polls are helpful and beneficial.

If you’re willing to let your voice count for equines, you may wish to visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=bIUU08nvuI_2fLQ1Q0_2fdEyOQ_3d_3d. That’s where you can participate in an evaluation of participation trends in the U.S. equine industry and the most important issues facing the industry, on behalf of American Horse Publications (AHP). AHP is a non-profit association which promotes better understanding and communications within the equine publishing industry; members include equine-related publications, professionals, students, organizations and businesses. Dr. C. Jill Stowe is providing consulting services for data collection and analysis to the AHP; Dr. Stowe is currently an assistant professor of Agricultural Economics at the University of Kentucky. The survey is sponsored by Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health and Pfizer Animal Health.

If you currently own, manage, or lease at least one horse, are 18 years of age or over, and live in the United States, you are eligible to complete the survey. Please answer the questions in this survey to the best of your ability, at your earliest convenience, and only one per household. The survey closes Jan. 15, 2010; and is anonymous. This means that no one, not even members of the research team, will know that the information you give comes from you, and only aggregated results of the survey will be presented.

On the horse health front, if you haul horses into or out of Texas you need to be aware of an equine piroplasmosis outbreak at Kleberg, TX, involving 32 head of Quarter Horses. The tick-borne protozoal disease creates clinical signs common to many diseases, including poor appetite and weight loss, and can lead to death. It transmits from horse to horse through ticks or needles, and can affect horses, donkeys, mules or zebras. It was confirmed in the state of Missouri last June, with a related case found in Kansas.

The Texas property where the disease has just been confirmed is under quarantine. The first sick horse went to a vet and was tested Oct. 2; the positive test for equine piroplasmosis was returned Oct. 12th. Another 96 horses have been tested and results are pending.

As a result of this, Canada has closed its border to horses from Texas until the outbreak is resolved; and horses from any other U.S. state wishing to enter Canada will need additional certification of not having been in Texas for at least 21 days.

As long as we’re talking equine disease, we should inform you the University of Kentucky’s Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center is on the cutting edge of disease tracking with a new online file-keeping system known as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS). LIMS will serve as an integrated online system for farmers to report incidence of disease by county, correlating with the technology used by the state veterinarian’s office. It will help the LDDC track disease reports in near real time – a feature that has not been available before – and prepare for infectious outbreaks or other disease situations, particularly those affecting the state’s equine population. The goal of the new system is to avoid pandemics similar to the mare reproductive loss syndrome occurrences in 2001. While not a contagious disease, MRLS resulted in losses to Kentucky’s horse industry of an estimated $340 million and about 30 percent of that season’s Thoroughbred foal crop. By organizing disease incidences by geographic location, scientists and veterinarians can predict trends and get a jump-start on treatments for seasonal illness (such as MRLS was). The system makes information available to farm managers and private practitioners, so they can administer appropriate vaccinations and implement necessary protocols to keep up with any predicted rise in diseases.

LDDC Director Craig Carter, DVM, PhD, Dip. ACVPM, said, “In the short term, it helps to get diagnostic test results down to the farm level in an accurate, timely fashion (to) help the local vet manage single outbreaks. In the long term, it’s part of a statewide animal health information network that will give us a broad awareness of what’s happening all across the state.”

LIMS also will aid in maintaining agricultural biosecurity by detecting potential outbreaks of diseases caused by any previously unidentified pathogens. For more information contact LDDC at 859/253-0571 or visit http://www.lddc.uky.edu/.

High school and Junior High Rodeo through the National High School Rodeo Association and their Wrangler Division offer great opportunities for American youth who love rodeo. Action from the best of their events is now available every Wednesday night at 9 p.m. Eastern on RFD TV.

One interesting (and I believe very positive) sidelight to these youth rodeo events is the NHSRA Shooting program, which gives young people a chance to learn and excel at rifle and shotgun shooting skills. Each state holds a Shooting Finals which qualifies youth to participate in the National Shooting Finals. Additionally, the National Rifle Association annually invites a youth to represent the NHSRA in the NRA-Brownell’s National Shooting Sports Ambassador Program. That program involves a $2,000 award, travel to the SHOT Show, meeting industry leaders and celebrities, and Ambassador Apparel jacket, shooting vest, book bag, etc.

At present the NHSRA is seeking volunteers who have shotgun or rifle shooting experience to help with these programs through becoming a Credentialed Coach or an NRA Certified Range Safety Officer.

To apply for the Ambassador program contact Lyn Larsen at llarsen@nhsra.org. To learn more about helping the NHSRA as a coach or safety officer, or to inquire about NRA educational programs offered to the NHSRA, contact NRA National Co-op Coordinator Claudia Olsen; colsen@nrahq.org or (703)267-1597.

We want’a tip our ol’ Tri-State Stetson to the Johnny Holloway family for puttin’ on what we hear was another great Cowboy Reunion at First Gold in Deadwood, SD, last Saturday nite. Our ranch day-work jobs prevented us from attending this year… or maybe I should say the limitations imposed by our old age prevented it. We weren’t doing daywork in the night… but anymore we can’t seem to play all night and work all day as well…

Anyhow, we’ve heard from several sources the event was bigger and better than ever, and a great time was had by all. We’re proud to learn our dear friend and favorite old-time horseman Gene Ulrich of Faith, SD, received the coveted T.C. Holloway bronc bronze as “Oldest Cowboy” at the gathering – we’re tippin’ the ol’ Tri-State Stetson to you, Gene. If you don’t know Gene, or if you don’t have any of his books on horse sense, you really need to fix that – give him a call at (605)967-2481… an’ tell him I sent ya’!

Looks like that’s the end of this ol’ lariat rope once more… my cowboy and I are off to another ranch job…