Preserving heritage and the past | TSLN.com

Preserving heritage and the past

For the Dec. 19, 2009 edition of Tri-State Livestock News.

Keeping up our focus on good news this month, have you heard about Equifava and PegasusTV.org? According to their website, Equifava, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to the sourcing, documentation and digitizing of film and video focusing on the history, knowledge and heritage of the horse and horse cultures throughout the world, and the creation of an accessible online video archive dedicated to the equine.

The innovative company researches, locates, acquires, restores, digitizes and catalogs every type of moving image available today, including but not limited to television programs, videos, feature films, newsreels and any other kind of moving images that can be identified, selected and viewed utilizing a searchable keyword database.

It also assists in the funding of educational and documentary video and film projects focusing on the equine by helping in the procurement of grants, provides guidance and expertise to producers seeking production funds and distribution, and functions as an international catalyst providing a continual flow of video-based education and information among horse people of all nations.

This is a wonderful thing because we are rapidly losing images of great horses, legendary riders, respected trainers, extraordinary performances, events, competitions, documentaries and even feature films and ‘Saturday morning’ serials. With the loss of these materials, the horse industry and equestrian communities throughout the world lose an important part of their heritage and past. Equifava says their goal is “to identify and preserve these films and videos so that generations to come will be able to appreciate and enjoy the extraordinary equine heritage which has been documented over the past one hundred or so years.”

They say, “From step-to-step methods of training horses to pull army artillery in World War I to record-breaking performances across a wide-array of equestrian disciplines and pursuits, the ever-expanding archives will be a comprehensive source of information and knowledge about the horse. PegasusTV.org was created to serve as the archives’ entry portal on the Internet, providing access to the thousands of hours of digital content documenting the horse throughout the centuries.

In addition to Equifava’s symbiotic relationships with educational and research institutions, the archives will also be available to the public through a low, fee-based subscription structure. Funding for the company’s operations is generated partially from these fees, in addition to grants, sponsorships and use-specific donations from individuals, organizations and companies. To learn more, go to http://www.equifava.org or http://www.pegasustv.org.

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Positive news on the equine health front is the record attendance at the recent American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) 55th Annual Convention in Las Vegas – numbering 7,611.

“The economy has affected all aspects of the horse industry in 2009, and I believe our record attendance indicates how strongly equine veterinarians value quality continuing education,” said David L. Foley, AAEP executive director.

From Tri-State country, Josie Traub-Dargatz, DVM, from Fort Collins, CO was elected to the Board of Directors from District VI.

I was interested to learn the AAEP’s coveted Equine Welfare Award, The Lavin Cup, went to the North American Equine Ranching Information Council (NAERIC), the nonprofit organization representing ranchers across the US and Canada who are involved in the collection of pregnant mare’s urine (PMU). I recall times this agricultural advocate group was criticized regarding animal welfare, so this honoring by the AAEP is very positive.

Chiropractic is a treatment option our family has utilized for generations, and the increasing availability of chiropractic for horses is, in my opinion, one of the most positive things in equine treatment. The demand for chiropractors trained in diagnosing and treating animals resulted in the birth of a school that teaches the chiropractic approach. It is Options For Animals and is located in Hillsdale, IL. Established in 1989 by Sharon Willoughby, DVM, DC, the school’s emphasis is horses and dogs in the 150-hour course for licensed veterinarians and chiropractors. The school attracts students from all geographic areas of the US as well as Canada and other countries, and although it was only open on a part-time basis at first, enrollment levels have increased to the point where today it operates on an ongoing schedule with an average of 60 students in each class or module.

Also offered at Options For Animals is a post-graduate course of 180 hours. Enrollment is limited to students who have completed the 150-hour course. The post-graduate course is offered in three segments, with one segment being available per year. Thus, three years would be involved in completing post-graduate work. The school does not officially certify graduates as approved animal chiropractors. Instead, the student must first finish the course and pass a written examination. Then, three case studies must be completed by the student and submitted to the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association (AVCA), which is also located in Hillsdale. If the case studies meet with association approval, the student is officially certified by the AVCA.

To learn more about the school or about equine chiropractic, go to http://www.animalchiropractic.org.

I see they’re making a full-length documentary movie about women jockeys. JOCK producers say it’s about “the first generation of female jockeys who in the late 60’s and early 70’s fought for the right to ride as professional jockeys. This year marks the 40th anniversary of their equal rights victory and their first historic races as professionals. Production on JOCK will begin in February with Barbara Jo Rubin’s 40th Anniversary event at Charles Town Races & Slots on Feb. 21st.”

There were some amazing women jockeys long before the 60’s – in fact we’re privileged to know one, Wantha Davis who’s in the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame. From the Depression years through the 1950’s she won more than 1,000 races, mostly against male jockeys, and was the first woman to compete at a pari-mutuel track. In 1949 Wantha beat three-time National Champion and Racing Hall of Fame jockey Johnny Longden in an exhibition match at Tijuana, Mexico’s Agua Caliente race course, breaking first from the gate and finishing 1 ¾ lengths ahead.

Nonetheless, this is bound to be a great movie, and you can find out more at the website http://www.jockthemovie.com, or by checking the Facebook Fan Page “JOCK Movie Club.”

Looks like our ol’ lariat rope is nearin’ the end – so my cowboy and I want’a wish you and yours every joy as you celebrate your merriest Christmas ever!

Keeping up our focus on good news this month, have you heard about Equifava and PegasusTV.org? According to their website, Equifava, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to the sourcing, documentation and digitizing of film and video focusing on the history, knowledge and heritage of the horse and horse cultures throughout the world, and the creation of an accessible online video archive dedicated to the equine.

The innovative company researches, locates, acquires, restores, digitizes and catalogs every type of moving image available today, including but not limited to television programs, videos, feature films, newsreels and any other kind of moving images that can be identified, selected and viewed utilizing a searchable keyword database.

It also assists in the funding of educational and documentary video and film projects focusing on the equine by helping in the procurement of grants, provides guidance and expertise to producers seeking production funds and distribution, and functions as an international catalyst providing a continual flow of video-based education and information among horse people of all nations.

This is a wonderful thing because we are rapidly losing images of great horses, legendary riders, respected trainers, extraordinary performances, events, competitions, documentaries and even feature films and ‘Saturday morning’ serials. With the loss of these materials, the horse industry and equestrian communities throughout the world lose an important part of their heritage and past. Equifava says their goal is “to identify and preserve these films and videos so that generations to come will be able to appreciate and enjoy the extraordinary equine heritage which has been documented over the past one hundred or so years.”

They say, “From step-to-step methods of training horses to pull army artillery in World War I to record-breaking performances across a wide-array of equestrian disciplines and pursuits, the ever-expanding archives will be a comprehensive source of information and knowledge about the horse. PegasusTV.org was created to serve as the archives’ entry portal on the Internet, providing access to the thousands of hours of digital content documenting the horse throughout the centuries.

In addition to Equifava’s symbiotic relationships with educational and research institutions, the archives will also be available to the public through a low, fee-based subscription structure. Funding for the company’s operations is generated partially from these fees, in addition to grants, sponsorships and use-specific donations from individuals, organizations and companies. To learn more, go to http://www.equifava.org or http://www.pegasustv.org.

Positive news on the equine health front is the record attendance at the recent American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) 55th Annual Convention in Las Vegas – numbering 7,611.

“The economy has affected all aspects of the horse industry in 2009, and I believe our record attendance indicates how strongly equine veterinarians value quality continuing education,” said David L. Foley, AAEP executive director.

From Tri-State country, Josie Traub-Dargatz, DVM, from Fort Collins, CO was elected to the Board of Directors from District VI.

I was interested to learn the AAEP’s coveted Equine Welfare Award, The Lavin Cup, went to the North American Equine Ranching Information Council (NAERIC), the nonprofit organization representing ranchers across the US and Canada who are involved in the collection of pregnant mare’s urine (PMU). I recall times this agricultural advocate group was criticized regarding animal welfare, so this honoring by the AAEP is very positive.

Chiropractic is a treatment option our family has utilized for generations, and the increasing availability of chiropractic for horses is, in my opinion, one of the most positive things in equine treatment. The demand for chiropractors trained in diagnosing and treating animals resulted in the birth of a school that teaches the chiropractic approach. It is Options For Animals and is located in Hillsdale, IL. Established in 1989 by Sharon Willoughby, DVM, DC, the school’s emphasis is horses and dogs in the 150-hour course for licensed veterinarians and chiropractors. The school attracts students from all geographic areas of the US as well as Canada and other countries, and although it was only open on a part-time basis at first, enrollment levels have increased to the point where today it operates on an ongoing schedule with an average of 60 students in each class or module.

Also offered at Options For Animals is a post-graduate course of 180 hours. Enrollment is limited to students who have completed the 150-hour course. The post-graduate course is offered in three segments, with one segment being available per year. Thus, three years would be involved in completing post-graduate work. The school does not officially certify graduates as approved animal chiropractors. Instead, the student must first finish the course and pass a written examination. Then, three case studies must be completed by the student and submitted to the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association (AVCA), which is also located in Hillsdale. If the case studies meet with association approval, the student is officially certified by the AVCA.

To learn more about the school or about equine chiropractic, go to http://www.animalchiropractic.org.

I see they’re making a full-length documentary movie about women jockeys. JOCK producers say it’s about “the first generation of female jockeys who in the late 60’s and early 70’s fought for the right to ride as professional jockeys. This year marks the 40th anniversary of their equal rights victory and their first historic races as professionals. Production on JOCK will begin in February with Barbara Jo Rubin’s 40th Anniversary event at Charles Town Races & Slots on Feb. 21st.”

There were some amazing women jockeys long before the 60’s – in fact we’re privileged to know one, Wantha Davis who’s in the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame. From the Depression years through the 1950’s she won more than 1,000 races, mostly against male jockeys, and was the first woman to compete at a pari-mutuel track. In 1949 Wantha beat three-time National Champion and Racing Hall of Fame jockey Johnny Longden in an exhibition match at Tijuana, Mexico’s Agua Caliente race course, breaking first from the gate and finishing 1 ¾ lengths ahead.

Nonetheless, this is bound to be a great movie, and you can find out more at the website http://www.jockthemovie.com, or by checking the Facebook Fan Page “JOCK Movie Club.”

Looks like our ol’ lariat rope is nearin’ the end – so my cowboy and I want’a wish you and yours every joy as you celebrate your merriest Christmas ever!