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Prevent equine herpes virus infection (EHV) with vaccine and health care

BROOKINGS, SD – Recent cases of equine herpes virus (EHV) infection in some western states remind horse owners to think critically about horse health care and preventative medicine programs, said Dr. Rebecca Bott, South Dakota State University Extension Equine Specialist.

“Traveling to competitions, sales, and other events where horses commingle poses a potential risk for spread of contagious diseases,” Bott said.

According to Dr. Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota State Veterinarian, EHV is diagnosed nearly every year in South Dakota.

“It is imperative that horse owners recognize the clinical signs of EHV, understand how it is transmitted. Especially since the disease can be prevented,” Bott said.

EHV is a virus that rears its head in horse populations around the nation. There are two strains of the virus (EHV-1 and EHV-4) which account for the majority of EHV infections. EHV is easily spread among horses through close contact. The disease generally manifests through three syndromes; respiratory infection (“rhinopneumonitis”), abortion and neurological disease.

BROOKINGS, SD – Recent cases of equine herpes virus (EHV) infection in some western states remind horse owners to think critically about horse health care and preventative medicine programs, said Dr. Rebecca Bott, South Dakota State University Extension Equine Specialist.

“Traveling to competitions, sales, and other events where horses commingle poses a potential risk for spread of contagious diseases,” Bott said.

According to Dr. Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota State Veterinarian, EHV is diagnosed nearly every year in South Dakota.

“It is imperative that horse owners recognize the clinical signs of EHV, understand how it is transmitted. Especially since the disease can be prevented,” Bott said.

EHV is a virus that rears its head in horse populations around the nation. There are two strains of the virus (EHV-1 and EHV-4) which account for the majority of EHV infections. EHV is easily spread among horses through close contact. The disease generally manifests through three syndromes; respiratory infection (“rhinopneumonitis”), abortion and neurological disease.

BROOKINGS, SD – Recent cases of equine herpes virus (EHV) infection in some western states remind horse owners to think critically about horse health care and preventative medicine programs, said Dr. Rebecca Bott, South Dakota State University Extension Equine Specialist.

“Traveling to competitions, sales, and other events where horses commingle poses a potential risk for spread of contagious diseases,” Bott said.

According to Dr. Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota State Veterinarian, EHV is diagnosed nearly every year in South Dakota.

“It is imperative that horse owners recognize the clinical signs of EHV, understand how it is transmitted. Especially since the disease can be prevented,” Bott said.

EHV is a virus that rears its head in horse populations around the nation. There are two strains of the virus (EHV-1 and EHV-4) which account for the majority of EHV infections. EHV is easily spread among horses through close contact. The disease generally manifests through three syndromes; respiratory infection (“rhinopneumonitis”), abortion and neurological disease.

– sdsu news release


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