Pro rodeo potpourri | TSLN.com

Pro rodeo potpourri

For the June 13, 2009 edition of Tri-State Livestock News.

I hope it’s rainin’ at your house like it’s rainin’ at mine! It’s coming down the way I remember from my childhood… a nice, slow drizzle resounding on the roof through the night, continuing through the day, heavy leaded skies promising more… yeeehaw!!!

No doubt the few folk who haven’t finished branding won’t complain, no matter how big the calves get, long as it keeps on raining.

With all the scary economic forecasts and actualities overshadowing everything you can see or hear on the news these days, it’s refreshing to learn that the Professional Rodeo Cowboy’s Association (PRCA) – who went through their own dire straits not long ago – are gettin’ on their feet in a good way. According to the latest ProRodeo Sports News, PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman and Keith Martin, Chairman of the Board, say the organization is “financially sound.” They report more entries and more fans in the grandstand for the group which saw approved events pay out more than $39.25 million in prize money last year. This represents a healthy 80 percent of the association’s expenses in ’08 going into membership programs and more than $1.8 million already committed for this year. Livestock welfare and a stronger fan base are among PRCA priorities for ’09. The need for new members is being addressed through multiple programs reaching out to young people – through Little Britches and High School Rodeo programs as well as College Rodeo.

Recognizing the impact of the World Wide Web in reaching the people of today’s world, ProRodeoLive.com is providing audio Webcasts of many key events. Our region will be featured through the Justin Boots Championships that’ll take place in Omaha, NE, September 24-26. Another Web outreach is a newly-re-designed website for ProRodeo Hall of Fame. Along with encouraging more visitors to the Hall the site is more interactive and user-friendly in an effort to “bring to life the history and pride of the Hall of Fame, according to PRCA Information Tech Wanda Bryant.

That site, http://www.prorodeohalloffame.com, is a great place to read about the 2009 class of honorees who will be inducted to ProRodeo Hall during the 31st Annual Induction Weekend, July 8th through 11th in Colorado Springs. The honorees include two from Tri-State Country – South Dakota’s late great rodeo producer and cowboy Erv Korkow; along with bronc riding champ Dan Mortensen from Montana. They’ll be joined by the late Leonard Ward, and living honorees Walt Arnold, Ace Berry and Ted Nuce.

In other news of Tri-State cowboys, a fundraiser has been scheduled for Jace Peterson at Dillon, MT. PRCA steer wrestler Jesse Peterson and wife Jenny are Jace’s parents. The boy has been repeatedly hospitalized and has to take a lot of medication because of a life-threatening seizure disorder. The event will take place at the University of Montana Western in Dillon on July 31st; and you can also donate through a benefit account at State Bank and Trust Company in Dillon. For details contact Danna Harrison at (406) 834-3429 or (406) 660-1136.

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Not long ago we reported here about compounded drugs probably being responsible for the deaths of many polo ponies in Florida. Recent updates on that front from the American Association of Equine Practitioners tell us, “Compounding is a process to produce a medication by combining or altering ingredients for the special needs of an equine patient. Only a licensed veterinarian may write a prescription for the compounded medication. Because there is a scarcity of approved medications for use in horses, there is a legitimate need for compounding in equine veterinary medicine. Some examples of legitimate compounding would include crushing a tablet and creating a paste or gel to aid in the administration to the patient or mixing two anesthetics in the same syringe for use in your horse.

“Compounded drugs are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration and can vary in potency, stability, purity and effectiveness. And because these products are unregulated by the government, compounded drugs have the potential to pose serious safety risks to horses.” They add, “The AAEP acknowledges that reputable pharmacies produce legitimate compounded drugs to improve the health of horses when an FDA-approved option doesn’t exist. However, when inappropriately compounded and used, these drugs may pose a serious threat to the health of your horse. Knowing the facts about legitimate and illegitimate compounded drugs will help you and your veterinarian decide on the best treatment option for your horse.”

Check things out carefully before you choose to use compounded drugs… your horse’s life should not be risked.

Cribbing is a vicious bad habit in horses that can lead to severe health damage, and it’s a booger to deal with. I was interested to learn Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine has recently done a survey on the vice. A postal questionnaire sent to 2000 subscribers of four major horse magazines by Dr. Julia Albright and colleagues yielded some 400 replies involving more than 3,500 horses; of which 4.5 percent were cribbers. Interestingly, Thoroughbreds were more than twice as likely as any other breed to crib. More than half the owners believed their horses were influenced into the bad habit by the behavior of horses around them, but there is some evidence of genetic predisposition to the vice. Learn more by going to http://www.equinescienceupdate.co.uk/cribus.htm.

You’ve been reading about the new equine alliances being formed to combat the influences and hindrances animal activists have been causing in the equine industry. We commend the efforts of Sue Wallis and friends… getting organized and united is always key.

I hear by the moccasin telegraph that Montana’s Ed Butcher is moving ahead with that state’s foundation to open a packing plant that can deal with horses. He’s pursuing foreign investors in China and Korea… a site in Billings has been considered for a plant and a group of community advocates in the Conrad, MT region are seeking to open a pork packing plant with a possible horse component. Asian markets should be interested in pork production since it’s such a staple in their diet, so this could lead to something very positive for the horse industry. We’ll try to keep you posted on developments.

Looks like that’s the muddy end of our ol’ lariat rope for this time…

I hope it’s rainin’ at your house like it’s rainin’ at mine! It’s coming down the way I remember from my childhood… a nice, slow drizzle resounding on the roof through the night, continuing through the day, heavy leaded skies promising more… yeeehaw!!!

No doubt the few folk who haven’t finished branding won’t complain, no matter how big the calves get, long as it keeps on raining.

With all the scary economic forecasts and actualities overshadowing everything you can see or hear on the news these days, it’s refreshing to learn that the Professional Rodeo Cowboy’s Association (PRCA) – who went through their own dire straits not long ago – are gettin’ on their feet in a good way. According to the latest ProRodeo Sports News, PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman and Keith Martin, Chairman of the Board, say the organization is “financially sound.” They report more entries and more fans in the grandstand for the group which saw approved events pay out more than $39.25 million in prize money last year. This represents a healthy 80 percent of the association’s expenses in ’08 going into membership programs and more than $1.8 million already committed for this year. Livestock welfare and a stronger fan base are among PRCA priorities for ’09. The need for new members is being addressed through multiple programs reaching out to young people – through Little Britches and High School Rodeo programs as well as College Rodeo.

Recognizing the impact of the World Wide Web in reaching the people of today’s world, ProRodeoLive.com is providing audio Webcasts of many key events. Our region will be featured through the Justin Boots Championships that’ll take place in Omaha, NE, September 24-26. Another Web outreach is a newly-re-designed website for ProRodeo Hall of Fame. Along with encouraging more visitors to the Hall the site is more interactive and user-friendly in an effort to “bring to life the history and pride of the Hall of Fame, according to PRCA Information Tech Wanda Bryant.

That site, http://www.prorodeohalloffame.com, is a great place to read about the 2009 class of honorees who will be inducted to ProRodeo Hall during the 31st Annual Induction Weekend, July 8th through 11th in Colorado Springs. The honorees include two from Tri-State Country – South Dakota’s late great rodeo producer and cowboy Erv Korkow; along with bronc riding champ Dan Mortensen from Montana. They’ll be joined by the late Leonard Ward, and living honorees Walt Arnold, Ace Berry and Ted Nuce.

In other news of Tri-State cowboys, a fundraiser has been scheduled for Jace Peterson at Dillon, MT. PRCA steer wrestler Jesse Peterson and wife Jenny are Jace’s parents. The boy has been repeatedly hospitalized and has to take a lot of medication because of a life-threatening seizure disorder. The event will take place at the University of Montana Western in Dillon on July 31st; and you can also donate through a benefit account at State Bank and Trust Company in Dillon. For details contact Danna Harrison at (406) 834-3429 or (406) 660-1136.

Not long ago we reported here about compounded drugs probably being responsible for the deaths of many polo ponies in Florida. Recent updates on that front from the American Association of Equine Practitioners tell us, “Compounding is a process to produce a medication by combining or altering ingredients for the special needs of an equine patient. Only a licensed veterinarian may write a prescription for the compounded medication. Because there is a scarcity of approved medications for use in horses, there is a legitimate need for compounding in equine veterinary medicine. Some examples of legitimate compounding would include crushing a tablet and creating a paste or gel to aid in the administration to the patient or mixing two anesthetics in the same syringe for use in your horse.

“Compounded drugs are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration and can vary in potency, stability, purity and effectiveness. And because these products are unregulated by the government, compounded drugs have the potential to pose serious safety risks to horses.” They add, “The AAEP acknowledges that reputable pharmacies produce legitimate compounded drugs to improve the health of horses when an FDA-approved option doesn’t exist. However, when inappropriately compounded and used, these drugs may pose a serious threat to the health of your horse. Knowing the facts about legitimate and illegitimate compounded drugs will help you and your veterinarian decide on the best treatment option for your horse.”

Check things out carefully before you choose to use compounded drugs… your horse’s life should not be risked.

Cribbing is a vicious bad habit in horses that can lead to severe health damage, and it’s a booger to deal with. I was interested to learn Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine has recently done a survey on the vice. A postal questionnaire sent to 2000 subscribers of four major horse magazines by Dr. Julia Albright and colleagues yielded some 400 replies involving more than 3,500 horses; of which 4.5 percent were cribbers. Interestingly, Thoroughbreds were more than twice as likely as any other breed to crib. More than half the owners believed their horses were influenced into the bad habit by the behavior of horses around them, but there is some evidence of genetic predisposition to the vice. Learn more by going to http://www.equinescienceupdate.co.uk/cribus.htm.

You’ve been reading about the new equine alliances being formed to combat the influences and hindrances animal activists have been causing in the equine industry. We commend the efforts of Sue Wallis and friends… getting organized and united is always key.

I hear by the moccasin telegraph that Montana’s Ed Butcher is moving ahead with that state’s foundation to open a packing plant that can deal with horses. He’s pursuing foreign investors in China and Korea… a site in Billings has been considered for a plant and a group of community advocates in the Conrad, MT region are seeking to open a pork packing plant with a possible horse component. Asian markets should be interested in pork production since it’s such a staple in their diet, so this could lead to something very positive for the horse industry. We’ll try to keep you posted on developments.

Looks like that’s the muddy end of our ol’ lariat rope for this time…